Title:
Ski press
United States Patent 2384850


Abstract:
This invention relates to presses for storing and carrying skis. An object of the invention is to provide a press or frame which will preserve the camber of the skis by maintaining them in curved position, concave with respect to the bottom of the skis. A feature of the invention is an elongated...



Inventors:
Poor, William F.
Application Number:
US53019844A
Publication Date:
09/18/1945
Filing Date:
04/08/1944
Assignee:
Poor, William F.
Primary Class:
Other Classes:
211/70.5
International Classes:
A63C11/02; B27M3/22
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Description:

This invention relates to presses for storing and carrying skis.

An object of the invention is to provide a press or frame which will preserve the camber of the skis by maintaining them in curved position, concave with respect to the bottom of the skis.

A feature of the invention is an elongated frame having a raised portion at its middle, over which the skis may be bent, and slots or latches for holding down the front and rear ends of the skis.

Other objects, features and advantages of the invention will be apparent from the following specification taken in connection with the accompanying drawing, in which: Figure 1 is a perspective view of one embodiment of the invention, showing the skis in position; Figure 2 is a perspective view of another embodiment, shown without the skis in place.

In Figure 1, the rear ends I and 2 of skis 3 and 4 pass through and are held down by the slots 5 and 6 in member 7, and also pass through the opening 8 in end piece 9. The middle parts 10 and II of the skis 3 and 4 are sprung upward in opposite directions from each other by passing over opposite sides of member 12. The forward ends 13 and 14 of the skis 3 and 4 are pressed down against the slots in the end piece 15, and held there by closing the bars 17 and 18, which turn on hinges, as at 19. The bar 17, when closed, may be held down by a latch 20, 21 of a conventional type. Bar 18 may also be so held by latch 22.

The middle piece 12, and the end pieces 7, 9 and 15 are supported from rods 23 and 24, which may be of metal or some material sufficiently strong to provide a fairly rigid support.

If both ski ends 14 and 13 are held down and clamped at once, the frame need not be quite so rigid, since the transverse pulls of the ski ends 13 and '14 will tend to neutralize each other.

Figure 2 illustrates a more rigid, but still light, type of frame. The pieces 9, 12 and 15, are supported by additional rods, four in all, shown as 23, 24, 25 and 26. These rods pass through the corners of the pieces 7, 12 and 15. Since two rods are used on each side, instead of one, the resultant design is more resistant to transverse stress, and fastening both adjacent ends of the skis at once is less necessary. In fact, with this construction, I prefer to make the frame rigid enough to obviate this.

In Figure 2, the piece 9 is shown supported by the separate extension rods 27 and 28, but they may be supported instead directly from the rods 23 to 26, inclusive, by extending the latter through piece 7 and into piece 9.

What I claim is: 1. A press for a pair of skis, said press comprising: a pair of long parallel rods, spaced apart a distance greater than the width of the skis to be held; a transverse member supported by one end of said pair of rods for holding the extreme rear ends of said skis; a second transverse member supported near, but spaced from, said first transverse member, by said pair of rods, said second transverse member being slotted to allow passage therethrough of the rear ends of the skis; a third transverse member supported at the other end of said pair of rods and slotted to receive the pair of skis near their forward ends; and a fourth transverse member supported between said second and third members and having slots for spacing the middle portion of said skis farther apart than the end portions held by the other transverse members.

2. A press for a pair of skis, said press comprising: a pair of long parallel rods, spaced apart a distance greater than the width of the skis to be held; a first transverse member near one end of said pair of rods, said member being slotted to allow passage therethrough of the rear ends of a pair of skis; a second transverse member supported at the other end of said pair of rods and slotted to receive the pair of skis near their forward ends; and another transverse member supported between said first and second transverse members and having slots for spacing the middle portion of said skis farther apart than the end portions held by the other transverse members.

WILLIAM F. POOR.