Title:
Incendiary bomb
United States Patent 2383720


Abstract:
This invention relates to an improvement in incendiary bombs, particularly of the type adapted to be transported by aircraft and dropped therefrom for destruction of objects on the ground. It is especially suitable for destroying by fire aircraft carriers, hangars, grounded airplanes, manufacturing...



Inventors:
Hamilton, Samuel B.
Application Number:
US46994942A
Publication Date:
08/28/1945
Filing Date:
12/23/1942
Assignee:
Hamilton, Samuel B.
Primary Class:
International Classes:
F42B12/44
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Description:

This invention relates to an improvement in incendiary bombs, particularly of the type adapted to be transported by aircraft and dropped therefrom for destruction of objects on the ground.

It is especially suitable for destroying by fire aircraft carriers, hangars, grounded airplanes, manufacturing plants, forests, and other objects which are readily combustible and would be ignited by such a bomb.

This bomb is of the type which contains a combustible material, such as a hydrocarbon, that is adapted to be ignited for its destruction effect.

Bombs have been suggested heretofore which utilize such hydrocarbons for this purpose, but no adequate or satisfactory provision was made for obtaining quick and effective ignition of the combustible material within the bomb when it reaches its objective.

The object of this invention is to improve the construction of the bomb to obtain effective and instantaneous ignition of the combustible material therein when the bomb exploes upon impact with its objective, and to spread out over a large area the combustible material for effective action thereof without its being readily extinguished particularly by water. Provision is made for preheating the combustible material in the bomb before explosion of the latter so as to increase its combustibility thereby obtaining more effective action by the bomb and rendering its extinguishment either by water orby sand much more difficult.

When the bomb is dropped from a high altitude, this allows a considerable period of time for preheating of the combustible fluid in the bomb, rendering it highly inflammable immediately upon impact of the bomb with its objective.

The object of this invention may be carried out by providing a chamber in the bomb which may be filled with a combustible liquid, with means provided for applying a combustible fluid around the exterior of said chamber before impact of the bomb, which latter fluid is ignited to obtain a preheating of the main body of fluid in the bomb. The mechanism provided for thus supplying and igniting the preheating material is simple but very effective to insure positive action, and yet will add little in cost to the bomb.

A preferred embodiment of the invention is illustrated in the accompanying drawing in which: Fig. 1 is a vertical sectional view through the bomb, partly in elevation; Fig. 2 is a top plan view of the tail assembly for the bomb; Fig. 3 is a plan view of the burner ring detached; Fig. 4 is a plan view of the firing wire eye, detached; Fig. 5 is a detail cross section through the control valve assembly, substantially on the line 5-5 of Fig. 1; Fig. 6 is a partial side elevation of the feeder pipe; Fig. 7 is a perspective view of the firing wire; Fig. 8 is a detail vertical section through the flint assembly; Fig. 9 is a perspective view of the igniting device, from the rear; Fig. 10 is a similar view thereof from the front; and Fig. 11 is a side elevation thereof.

The bomb shown has a shell portion designated generally by the numeral I which encloses a chamber A. The shell I is preferably constructed of thin sheet metal, inasmuch as it is not required to sustain a substantial pressure. The lower end of the shell I is connected with a nose portion 2 which is welded or otherwise rigidly secured to the shell I. The nose portion 2 has a percussion cap 3 in the lower end thereof, from which percussion cap 3 an explosion chamber B extends upwardly into the chamber A. The nose portion 2 encloses a chamber C which is '0 separated from the chamber A by a division plate 4.

The upper end of the shell I has a filling opening therein normally closed by a plug 5. This upper end also carries the tail assembly designated generally by the numeral 6, which is adapted to hold the bomb in a vertical position during its descent and aiding in the direction of the bomb at the target. The tail assembly shown has a series of four fins 7 (Fig. 2), which fins are arranged at angles of 900 to each other, and separated by box sides 8 which are secured substantially in square relation with an opening therethrough, as will be evident from Fig. 2.

Surrounding the upper portion of the nose 2 is a burner ring 9 constructed in the form of an a.nnular tube, as will be evident from Figs. 3 and 5. This burner ring has orifices 10 in the upper side thereof in position to 'direct jets of liquid against the surrounding sides of the shell i. A valve assembly Ii is provided in the burner ring 9 at one side thereof, which valve assembly is shown as having a rotatable valve body 12 adapted to control communication from a pipe 13 which serves as a feeder line, into the burner ring 9, as is evident from Fig. 5. The valve 11 has an operating handle 14 for operating the same, and upon rotation of the valve through 90°, the flow of the fluid to the burner ring may be controlled. The feeder line 13 extends downward to a point near the bottom of the chamber C, as will be evident from Fig. 1. The upper side of the valve assembly if has a jet orifice 15 adapted to receive fluid from a bored portion 16 of the valve body 12, as shown in Figs. 3 and 5.

The valve assembly II is adapted to be operated by a firing wire 17, one end of which is connected with the handle 14 while the other end thereof extends upwardly beside the shell I in position for manipulation by the bombardier when the bomb is launched from an airship. The wire 17 is guided through an eye 18 attached to a side of the shell I.

Mounted on the nose portion 2 of the bomb in close proximity to the valve assembly II, is an igniting device designated generally by the nu-meral 19 in Fig. 11. This igniting device is of known construction, and is secured in position for ignitng the combustible fluid discharged from the burner ring 9 when the bomb is launched.

The igniting device is shown generally in Figs. 8 to 11, and comprises a wick 20 in position to receive combustible fluid from the jet 15 (Fig. 3).

A flint device 21, has a spring-pressed flint 22, bearing against a wheel 23 in position for igniting the wick 20 upon rotation of the wheel. The wheel 23 is adapted to be rotated by a coiled spring 24 controlled by a ratchet wheel 25 and' adapted to be wound by a thumb piece 28. The ratchet wheel 26 is controlled by a dog 26 mounted for vertical sliding movement in the igniting device 19, by means of a link 27 connected with the firing wire 17, as shown in Fig. 7.

The guiding movement of the dog 26 in the igniting device causes it to remain in its elevated position when lifted by the link 27.

One side of the nose portion 2 is provided with a filling opening therethrough adapted to be closed by a plug device designated generally by the numeral 29. This plug device may be constructed as an air pump, as shown, for forcing air into the chamber C, or as a valve to control the admission of air and fluid thereto. This plug device 29 may be removed from the opening to permit a combustible liquid to be supplied to the chamber C to a desired height therein.

Normally the chamber C is not filled, but has a substantial quantity of combustile liquid therein to a point below the filling opening. Then the plug device 29 is reinserted and air under pressure is applied to the chamber C, the pressure being sufficient to discharge the combustible liquid from the chamber when the valve unit I I is opened, requiring about five pounds' pressure for ordinary sizes.

The chamber A should also be filled with a combustible liquid or other medium, preferably gasoline. If desired, this chamber A may be filled with a solution of gasoline and rosin to insure quick ignition and long burning.

The explosion chamber B should be loaded withi an explosive of such character as to blow open the bomb shell when the explosive is ignited.

This chamber B is filled to the junction of the chamber C through the opening for the percussion cap 3, after which this cap is reinserted.

Then upon winding the spring 24, the bomb is ready for use.

When the bomb is discharged for aircraft, provision should be made either for automatic or manual actuation of the firing wire 17 when the bomb is launched. This is the only act required to insure operation of the bomb. Upon pulling up the wire 17, the valve 11 is opened causing the combustile liquid, such as gasoline, in the chamber C to be discharged under pressure through the feeder line 13 into the burner ring 9, as indicated by the arrows. in Pig. 5. This liquid will be discharged in jets through the orifices 10. At the same time, the lifting of the wire 17 will draw up the dog 26, thereby releasing the ratchet wheel 25 and- allowing rotation of the wheel 23 by the spring 24, thus causing ignition of the wick 20 and lighting the fuel discharged from the jets 10 of the burner ring. It will be obvious that the discharge of fuel from these jets will cause this fuel to spread out over the surrounding surface of the shell I, so that it will be readily ignited by the wick 20.

This fuel continues to be discharged and to burn during the falling of the bomb, thereby preheating the combustible liquid in the chamber A to a high temperature before the bomb strikes its objective. The percussion cap 3 will ignite the explosive charge in the chamber B, which will thereby burst the chamber A and scatter the heated liquid therefrom, which will become ignited instantly from the burner ring 9. This causes the combustible liquid to be spread over a wide area and to be ignited substantially upon contact, so as to cause material destruction by fire. The spreading of the combustible material over a large area makes it very difficult for the fire to be extinguished either by water or by sand, thus accomplishing effective damage to the objective.

I claim: 1. An incendiary bomb comprising a shell enclosing a chamber therein for a combustible liquid, a nose portion attached to one end of the shell and enclosing a feeder chamber therein for containing fuel, a burner surrounding the firstmentioned chamber and constructed for directing flames substantially against the surrounding wall thereof for preheating the combustible liquid therein, .a valve for controlling discharge of the fuel from the feeder chamber to said burner, means for opening said valve, and means for igniting said burner.

2. An incendiary bomb comprising a shell enr closing a chamber therein for a combustible liquid, a nose portion attached to one end of the shell and enclosing a feeder chamber therein for containing fuel, a burner surrounding the firstmentioned chamber and constructed for direct5" ing flames substantially against the surrounding wall thereof for preheating the combustible liquid therein, a valve for controlling discharge of the fuel from the feeder chamber to said burner, means for opening said valve, means for sup6o plying fuel under pressure to said feeder chamber, and an igniting device secured to one of said chambers adjacent the burner in position for igniting the same upon opening of the valve.

3. An incendiary bomb comprising a shell enclosing a chamber therein for a combustible liquid, a nose portion attached to one end of the shell and enclosing a feeder chamber therein for containing fuel, a burner surrounding the firstmentioned chamber and constructed for directing flames substantially against the surrounding wall thereof for preheating the combustible liquid therein, a valve for controlling discharge of the fuel from the feeder chamber to said burner, Smeans for opening said valve, means for supplying fuel under pressure to said feeder chamber, an igniting device secured to one of said chambers adjacent the burner in position for igniting the same upon opening of the valve, said igniting device having a flint assembly and wick adjacent the burner with means for lighting the wick, control means for said igniting device connected with the valve opening means, and an explosive chamber in the first-mentioned chamber and having a percussion cap connected therewith for discharging the explosive upon impact of said cap.

4. An incendiary'bomb comprising a container for a combustible fluid, a burner having a plurality of outlets surrounding said container arranged for directing flame therefrom to the peripheral walls of the container for preheating the combustible fluid therein, a feeder chamber containing fuel for said burner, means for supplying fuel under pressure to said burner, means carried by said bomb for igniting the fuel supplied to said burner, and means for discharging the combustible fluid from the container after preheating thereof.

5. An incendiary bomb comprising a container, a division plate in said container dividing 2, said container into compartments, a combustible fluid in one compartment, a fuel in the other compartment, a burner surrounding the fuel compartment, means to supply fuel under pressure from the fuel compartment to the burner, means carried by the bomb for igniting said burner and preheating the combustible fluid, and means for discharging the combustible fluid after preheating thereof.

6. An incendiary bomb comprising a container having a tail portion and a nose portion, a division plate in said container dividing said container into separate compartments one larger than the other with the small compartment leading, a combustible fluid in the larger compartment, a fuel in the smaller compartment, a burner ring having outlets surrounding the fuel compartment, means in said fuel compartment for supplying fuel under pressure to said burner ring, ignition means adjacent said burner ring for igniting the fuel therein and preheating the combustible fluid in the larger compartment, and Sguiding means for the tail portion of said bomb including a plurality of vanes arranged substantially at right angles to each other, and box sides extending between the vanes and connecting them together, said nose portion of the bomb having means for discharging the combustible material after preheating thereof.

SAMUEL B. HAMILTON.