Title:
Sectional sliding door
United States Patent 2373023


Abstract:
This invention relates to sliding doors for garages, airplane hangars, and the like, in which a relatively wide door opening is to.be closed, and more particularly to compound sliding doors of the type comprising a plurality of relatively movable interconnected sections or panels disposed in...



Inventors:
Goodwin, Eugene W.
Application Number:
US32729940A
Publication Date:
04/03/1945
Filing Date:
04/01/1940
Assignee:
Goodwin, Eugene W.
Primary Class:
International Classes:
E06B3/01
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Description:

This invention relates to sliding doors for garages, airplane hangars, and the like, in which a relatively wide door opening is to.be closed, and more particularly to compound sliding doors of the type comprising a plurality of relatively movable interconnected sections or panels disposed in parallel overlapping relation.

In structures of this kind, the doors are frequently large, and to properly withstand the wind pressures and other forces imposed upon them, I they must be strongly constructed; however, to save space, an effort is usually made to build the doors as thin as practicable, which results in large, thin doors of great weight.

When such a door is moved, the velocity of the 1 wind, the condition of the supporting track, and the possibility that some of the door panels may be frozen one to another, may require the application of considerable'force, and, to operate successfully, the interconnections between the sev- 2 eral panels of the door must be substantial. In one such interconnected system, all of the sections or panels move simultaneously when power is applied to any one, the panels, however, moving over progressively increasing distances and at prokressively increasing speeds, from one end of the series to the other. This is accomplished by providing a flexible belt passing horizontally around and extending along both sides of each door section, this belt running freely around pulleys and being, anchored to the sections or panels at either side thereof.

In an interconnection of ths type, and for the reasons stated, the cables must be stroig and of substantial diameter, and this makes it desirable to use pulleys as large as possible in order to insure proper operation and long life of the cables.

Also, because of the desirability of placing the door panels as close together as will permit their proper operation and sealing against the weather, it is necessary to keep the runs of the cable close to the sides of the door panel.

One object of the present invention is to successfully meet the above condition,. and to this end I have devised a novel arrangement in which the pulleys are set in a plane inclined to or making an acute angle with the plane of the panel.

By virtue of this arrangement, the .pulleys can be made of a diameter substantially greater than the thickness of the door panel, while maintaining the runs of the cable close to. the surfaces thereof.

Further, in my improved construction, I mount the pulleys adjacent the leading edge of the panels at a point spaced inwardly from such edge, so that the pulley extends transversely through the panel itself, leaving the extreme leading edge of the panel entirely free and unobstructed, and placing the pulleys in a position which affords i protection from injury and weather.

A further object is to prevent the deterioration of the interconnections such as would be caused by exposure and weather, the formation of ice on moving parts, and the possibility of dam0 age due to being struck by objects passing through the door opening, and to this end I provide means to conceal and shield the interconnections so that they will not be exposed on the outside surfaces of the door.

A still further object of the invention is to devise improved means for maintaining the tension of the belts and for absorbing shocks due to the sudden starting or stopping of one panel relative to another.

0o The invention also contemplates improved means for detachably connecting the cables to the door panels so that any individual panel may be readily disconnected if desired.

In order that the invention may be readily un25 derstood, reference is had to the accompanying drawings, forming part of this specification, and in which: Fig. 1 is an elevation of a set of four door panels constructed in accordance with the inven3o tion, the door panels being viewed from the outside of the building; Fig. 2 is a conventional plan view of the door panels shown in Fig. 1, parts being broken away; Fig. 3 is a front edge elevation, on an enlarged :t:, scale, of the four door panels shown in Fig. 1, parts being broken away; Fig. 4 is a side elevation, on an enlarged scale, of one of the pulleys and supporting brackets emSployed at the rear or trailing edge of the door 40 panels; Fig. 5 is a fragmentary side elevation on a similar scale, of the forward or leading edge of one of the door panels, showing the pulley mounted therein, parts being broken away and parts shown 45 in dotted lines; Fig. 6 is an edge view of the pulley shown in Fig. 5, together with the supporting means there. for; Fig. 7 is a side elevation of my improved belt so coupling and anchoring means, parts being shown in section; and Fig. 8 is an end view of the parts shown in Fig. 7.

Referring to the drawings in detail, there is as illustrated a portion of a building A having a doorway formed therein, across which doorway extends a pavement B of concrete or the like. In this pavement are set a plurality of rails or tracks C shown in Fig. 3 as comprising railroad rails embedded in the concrete B up to their heads.

On these rails run the several door panels, as hereinafter described. At the top of the doorway and supported on suitable frame members such as I-beams D, are a plurality of spaced guide rails E, shown in Fig. 3 as consisting of angle irons welded to the I-beams. Associated with the guide rails E are one or more rigid stops F (Fig.. 1) adapted to be engaged by the door panels to limit their movement.

. It will be understood that, in practice, two sets of door panels, such as shown in Fig. 1, would ordinarily be employed, one set operating from each side of the doorway, and the sets meeting in the middle at the stop F. In this way, it is possible to readily provide a closure for a doorway of sufficient width to accommodate even the largest airplanes.

Obviously any desired number of sections or panels may be employed. In the drawings, I have shown, by way of example, four such panels and have designated them by the numbers I, 2, 3 and 4 in Figs. 1, 2 and 3, the numeral I designating the door panel nearest the wall at one side of the doorway.

Each door panel itself may be of any desired construction and is illustrated in the drawings more or less conventionally. Each panel will comprise a suitable framework, preferably made of structural steel and including a channel iron at its front or leading edge and a similar channel iron 6 at its rear or trailing edge. The framework is covered on the outside of the door panel with a suitable skin I of sheet steel or the like, the framework on the inside of the panel preferably being left exposed.

At the upper edge of each panel is provided two or more guide rollers 8 mounted in suitable brackets 9, these rollers being of a diameter substantially equal to the distance between the guide, rails E so that they may run freely between such rails.

Each panel is provided at its bottom edge with two or more flanged supporting rollers 10 (see Fig. 3), adapted to rest upon and engage the track rails C. Thus the panels may roll freely on the rails C and are held in position at the top by the guide rollers 8.

A pair of belt pulleys is mounted on each door panel at a point between the upper and lower edges thereof. One of these pulleys, designated I I, is disposed adjacent but just inside of the leading edge of the door, while the other pulley, designated 12, is spaced rearwardly from the trailing edge of the panel and is mounted in a bracket secured to such edge.

As pointed out in the preamble, an important feature of the present invention consists in setting these pulleys II and 12 in a common plane which is disposed at an acute angle or inclined to the plane of the panel. Thus, in Fig. 3, the pulleys are shown as disposed at an angle of approximately 45°, although any other desired angle may of course be employed. By virtue of this angular arrangement, it will be seen that the pulleys are of a diameter considerably greater than the thickness of the door panels, and the nearer the plane of the pulleys approaches the vertical, the larger can the pulleys be made.

A flexible endless belt Is extends around the pulleys of each panel, one run of this bept MhIr disposed on each side of the panel, and the runs on opposite sides of the panel lying in different horizontal planes. The belt is shown as made of a wire cable, and it will be noted that the extra large size of the pulleys, made possible by their angular arrangement, eliminates sharp bends and results in subjecting the cables to only such moderate flexing as they can readily withstand. In this way, it is possible to use a cable of sufficient strength and stiffness to operate the larger sizes of doors without undue wear or deterioration.

Referring now to Figs. 5 and 6, I have illustrated in detail one method of supporting the pulleys II adjacent the front or leading edge of the door panels. These pulleys are supported upon a pair of spaced parallel, rods 14 on which freely slides a frame comprising a pair of crossheads 15 and a pair of spaced side members 16.

The shaft 17 of the pulley I is mounted in these g2 side members 16, as shown in Fig. 6. Movably mounted on the inner ends of the rods 14 is a third cross-bar 19, having a central opening through which slides a tail piece 18, carried by the frame 15, 16, and interposed between this frame and the cross-piece 19, and surrounding the tail piece 18, is a short stiff helical spring 21. The tension on this spring may be adjusted by turning up the nuts 20 working on the threaded ends of the rods 14.

80 The opposite ends of these rods are also threaded and extend through openings in the channel member' 5 at the forward edge of the panel, being rigidly secured in position by means of lock nuts 22 and 23. The inner ends of the :5 rods 14, beyond the nuts 20, may be supported by means of an angle clip 24 secured to the framework (not shown) of the panel.

The pulley 12 at the rear or trailing end of the panel, as shown in Fig. 4, is supported by a V-shaped bracket 25, secured at its ends, as at 26, to the channel iron 6. The pulley is mounted in a frame 15, .16, similar to that already described, which slides freely upon a pair of rods 27, secured at their rear ends by nuts 28 to the bracket 25, and at their forward ends by nuts 29, 30 to the channel iron 6. Adjacent this channel iron, the rods are provided with relatively long threaded portions 27a, on which the frame 15, 16 may be longitudinally adjusted by means of the cross-piece 19 and nuts 20, a spring 21 being interposed between the cross-piece and frame, as above described. Thus the slidable cross-piece 19 and nuts 20 serve the purpose both of adjusting the position of the pulley frame 15, 16 on the rods 27, so as to take up any slack in the cable 13, and also to regulate the tension on the spring 21. It will thus be seen that the spring 21 at each end of the belt tends to maintain tension on the belt, and tends to resist movement of (0 the pulley frames toward each other.

Referring again to Fig. 5, it will be seen that the pulleys, such as II, extend transversely through the panel itself, at an acute angle thereto, and the skin 7 of the panel Is cut away to provide a slot 71 through which the upper edge of the pulley may project so as to bring one run of the belt cable adjacent the outer surface of the panel.

In order to conceal this run of the belt cable, as well as the projecting edge of the pulley itself, I provide a guard or shield 31 of the shape shown in Fig. 3. This shield is secured to the outer face of the panel at a point above tne pulley I1, and extends entirely across the panel to the rear »v Made thereof. Its lower edge is disposed between the belt and the next adjacent panel. This not 3 only conceals the belt cable and associated parts, c but also protects them from the weather. In order to more completely house the pulley II,' c the shield 31 is preferably provided with a closed . front end, as indicated at 31 .

As above explained, each belt cable 13 is connected to the next adjacent panel. This connec- 2 tion can conveniently be accomplished by means of the coupling device which must be employed o10 to secure the ends of the belt cable together. A one-piece coupling of any suitabl te e may be employed if desired, but I have illustrated in Figs. 7 and 8, by way of example, a two-piece coupling comprising socket members 32 and 33, secured I to the cable ends. The member 32 is provided with an eye, and the member 33 is bifurcatedand provided with a pair of aligned o ign penings. When the two coupling members are assembled, a hollow rivet or sleeve 34 is passed through the aligned -., openings and its ends flanged over, as shown in g. 7. Thus, the coupling members are permanently secured together.

The above described coupling is anchored or connected to the panels by the following means. ., Secured to each panel by means of bolts 31 is a bracket 36 having a thickened central portion 38 through which passes a vertical opening. Seated upon the portion 38 is a removable block or spacing member 39 of substantially the same lateral : dimensions, and the portion 38 and block 39 are provided with aligned openings through which a bolt 35 may pass, this bolt also passing through the hollow rivet or sleeve 34 in the coupling. Thus the belt cable is firmly anchored to the panel by 5 means of the bolt 35 and bracket 36, as shown.

In practice, it is sometimes desirable to disconnect the adjacent panels from each other so that one panel may be operated independently of the others. In this event, all that it is neces- e4 sary to do to remove the bolt 35 from the sleeve 34 and bracket 36. This disconnects the belt cable from the anchoring bracket 36, but at the same time the coupling members are held together by means of the sleeve 34, so that the continuity of the belt is not disturbed. In other words, the belt remains in its original condition but is simply detached from the anchoring bracket.

If a one-piece coupling is employed, it will 5 simply be provided with an opening to receive the bolt 35, and the same advantages will result.

In either event, it will be noted that when the bolt 35 is removed, the block 39 can also be lifted out. Elimination of this block provides, ample clearance between the coupling and the bracket 36,.so that it may freely pass, and it also provides clearance for the closed end 31a of the shield 31 to pass such bracket.

As will be understood, it is necessary for the belt cable of each panel to be connected to the next adjacent panel on either side thereof. Thus, each belt must have two couplings; one on each side of the panel, and each of the intermediate panels must have two anchoring brackets, one on 6 each side.

By reference to Fig. 3 it will be seen that anchoilng brackets 36. such as above described, are secured to the inner surface of door panels I and 2. A similar bracket is secured to the side of the 7( building A, adjacent the panel I, by means of special bolts 1a. These anchoring brackets all lie in substantially the same horizontal plane.

There is another set of similar brackets also required, which,, for clearness, I have designated 71 16'. These are shown in Fig. 3 as secured to the uter side of panels 2, 3 and C.

In practice, these brackets 36' would be setured to the panels adjacent their rear edge, and Ls a matter of fact, would be associated with the )racket 25. In Fig. 4, there is shown a vertical )late 40, welded at its lower edge to the bracket !5 and having its end adjacent the panel flanged wer and secured to the channel iron 6, as by neans of bolts 41. The bracket 36' is shown as nounted upon this plate 4, by means of the bolts 31.

Since the outermost or end panel 4 carries no belt or pulleys, it is not necessary to equip it with a bracket of the type shown at 25 in Fig. 4. All that ireqe isreuire is a relatively small bracket, of any desired construction, of sufficient size to support the anchoring bracket 36'. In Figs. 1 and 2, such a supporting bracket is conventionally illustrated at 25'.

Referring again to Fig. 4, it will be obvious that the anchoring bracket 36' there shown is not attached to the cable 13 illustrated immediately above it, but, on the oter hand, is intended to be attached to the lower run of cable e of the next adjacent panel. Thus, if it is assumed that Fig. 4 illustrates panel 2, the bracket 36' carried thereby is adapted to be connected to the lower run of the cable carried by the adjacent panel I.

An attempt has been made in Fig. 2 to illustrate conventionally the general arrangement. The cable 13 of panel I is anchored at 36 .to the wall of the building at one side of the panel, and at 36' to the adjacent panel 2 at the other side of panel I. Similarly, the belt of panel 2 is anchored at 36 to panel I, and at 36' to panel 3. The belt of panel 3 is anchored at 36 to panel 2, and at 36' to panel 4.

It will be understood that the panels are disposed in parallel, slightly offset, overlapping relation, and that when force is applied to any one panel, all of the panels move simultaneously.

It will also be clear that when the door is open, the several panels will be positioned in fully overlapped relation on the inside of the building A with their front edges substantially aligned in a plane at right angles to their path of movement. When they are moved from this position toward closed position, each successive panel moves faster and further than the preceding one, in arithmetical progression. Thus, panel 2 moves twice as fast and twice as far as panel I, panel 3 moves three times as fast and as far, and panel 4 moves four times as fast and as far as panel I, all of the panels reaching their final position at the same time.

While my improved door may be operated by hand, if not too large, I contemplate operating it by suitable power driven means (not shown).

This may be applied to any of the panels, but preferably to panel 4.

When such power operated means is employed and applied to one panel, considerable strain is exerted on the belt cables at the moment of starting and stopping. The spiings 21, however, which exert a force tending to resiliently maintain the -tension on the cables, serve as cushions to absorb the shocks due to sudden starting and stopping of the driven panel, such 0 shocks being due to the momentum or Inertia of the panels.

It will be noted that the centers of the pulleys on all panels lie in substentially the same horizontal plane and that the shields SI, when 5 viewed in side elevation, as shownin P ig. 1, al lie in substantially the same straight line, thus providing a pleasing architectural detail.

What I claim, is: 1. A sliding door comprising a plurality of upright, relatively movable panels, disposed in parallel, overlapping relation, pulleys mounted adjacent opposite edges of each panel, a flexible belt running freely around the pulleys of each panel, and anchoring means connecting said belt with the next adjacent panel on either side, said pulleys lying in a plane disposed at a substantial acute angle to the plane of the panel, and the runs of the belt on opposite sides of the panel lying in different horizontal planes.

2. A sliding door comprising a plurality of upright, relatively movable panels, disposed in parallel, overlapping relation, pulleys mounted adjacent opposite edges of each panel, a flexible belt running freely around the pulleys of each panel, and anchoring means connecting said belt with the next adjacent panel on either side, said pulleys lying in a plane inclined to the plane of the panel, whereby said pulleys have a diameter substantially greater than the thickness of the panel, while the runs of the belt are maintained relatively close to the sides of the panel.

3. A sliding door comprising a plurality of upright, relatively movable panels, disposed in parallel, overlapping relation, pulleys mounted adjacent opposite edges of each panel, a flexible belt running freely around the pulleys of each panel, said belt having a coupling therein, a bracket secured to the next adjacent panel, a removable bolt for anchoring said coupling to said bracket, a member for normally spacing said coupling from said bracket, and means whereby, when said bolt is removed to disconnect the parts, said spacing member may also be removed to provide additional clegrance between said coupling and bracket.

4. A sliding door comprising a plurality of upright, relatively movable panels, disposed in parallel, overlapping relation, pulleys mounted adjacent opposite edges of each panel, a flexible belt running freely around the pulleys of each panel, and anchoring means connecting said belt with the next adjacent panel on either side, said pulleys lying in a plane disposed at an acute angle to the plane of the panel, and the centers of all pulleys on all of the panels lying in substantially the same horizontal plane.

5. A sliding door comprising a plurality of upright, relatively movable panels, disposed in parallel, overlapping relation, pulleys mounted adjacent opposite edges of each panel, a flexible belt running freely around the pulleys of each panel, said belt having a coupling therein, a bracket comprising a fixed portion secured to the next adjacent panel, and having a removable portion interposed between said fixed portion and belt, and an anchoring bolt passing through said coupling and both the fixed and removable portions 6 of said bracket, whereby, when said bolt is taken out, the coupling is disconnected from the bracket and the removable portion may be removed,,thus affording clearance between said coupling and fixed portion.

6. A sliding door comprising a plurality of upright, relatively movable panels, disposed in parallel, overlapping relation, pulleys mounted adjacent opposite edges of each panel, a flexible belt running freely around the pulleys of each panel, and anchoring means connecting said belt with the next adjacent panels on either side, said pulleys lying in a plane disposed at a substantial acute angle to the plane of the panel and the runs of the belt on opposite sides of the panel lying in different horizontal planes, the pulley adjacent one edge of each panel being spaced inwardly from said edge, and extending transversely through the panel'itself beyond the plane thereof on both sides.

7. A sliding door comprising a plurality of upright, relatively movable panels, disposed in parallel, overlapping relation, pulleys mounted adjacent opposite edges of each panel, a flexible belt running freely around the pulleys of each panel, and anchoring means connecting said belt with the next adjacent panel on either side, said pulleys lying in a plane inclined to the plane of the panel, whereby said pulleys have a diameter substantially greater than the thickness of the panel, while the runs of the belt are maintained relatively close to the sides of the panel, and a shield overhanging and concealing the run of the belt on at least one side of the panel, the runs of the belt on the same side of all of the panels being disposed at the same horizontal level, so that all of the shields on the same side of the panels, when viewed in side elevation, lie in a substantially unbroken, straight line.

8. A sliding door comprising a plurality of upright, relatively movable panels, disposed in parallel, overlapping relation, pulleys mounted adjacent opposite edges of each panel, a flexible belt running freely around the pulleys of each panel, and anchoring means connecting said belt with the next adjacent panel on either side, said pulleys lying in a plane inclined to the plane of the panel, whereby said pulleys have a diameter substantially greater than the thickness of the panel, while the runs of the belt are maintained relatively close to the sides of the panel, and the runs of the belt on the same side of all of the panels lying at the same horizontal level.

EUGENE W. GOODWIN.