Title:
Fabric venetian blind
United States Patent 2370794


Abstract:
The present invention relates to Venetian blind structures and particularly to such structures in which the closable members are fabric strips. More particularly still, the invention relates to such a Venetian blind structure in which the fabric strips are in two groups such that when the blind...



Inventors:
Walter, Houmere
Application Number:
US51675544A
Publication Date:
03/06/1945
Filing Date:
01/03/1944
Assignee:
Walter, Houmere
Primary Class:
Other Classes:
160/120, 160/121.1, 160/168.1R, 160/168.1V, 160/176.1V, 160/196.1, 160/900
International Classes:
E06B9/36
View Patent Images:



Description:

The present invention relates to Venetian blind structures and particularly to such structures in which the closable members are fabric strips. More particularly still, the invention relates to such a Venetian blind structure in which the fabric strips are in two groups such that when the blind is closed the strips of one group alternate with those of the other, the strips of the first group being parallel to those of the second group but lying in front of those of the second group. Furthermore, the structure is so arranged that in operating the fabric strips from their closed to their open positions the strips of one group rotate in the opposite direction to those of the other group.

The structure generally outlined above is to be compared with that shown in my Patent No. 2,173,275, issued September 19, 1939. In the earlier structure the fabric strips were so arranged as to comprise a single group rotatable in the same direction from open to closed position and when closed being so positioned that one edge of each strip overlapped the opposite edge of the next adjacent strip. As explained in the mentioned patent, this overlapping tended to cause the strips to "sideslip" and means were provided comprising in general a raising of the central portion of each strip to overcome this tendency.

In my present structure, due to the arrangement of the fabric strips in groups as above mentioned, this tendency does not exist. In addition, the appearance of the Venetian blind structure is enhanced by the present arrangement and, furthermore, the present structure makes possible the use of a common type of shade roller for mounting the blind structure although the cord controlled pulley arrangement common in connection with Venetian blind structures and disclosed in the earlier patent above mentioned may also be utilized.

It is an object of the invention to provide a Venetian blind structure comprising vertical fabric strips in which the strips are arranged in two groups which are parallel to each other when closed and which are opened by rotating the strips about their vertical axes in opposite directions.

It is another object of the invention to provide such a blind structure which is adapted to utilization of the common shade roller as a means upon which to wind the blind structure.

It is a further object of the invention to provide a Venetian blind structure utilizing a pair of rollers, of which one or both may be spring rollers, as a means upon which to raise or wind the blind structure.

It is a still further object of the invention to so arrange the fabric strips in groups and to g pivot them about their vertical axes with such pivoting radii that there will be no interference between the strips of the two groups when they are opened or closed.

Other objects and features of the invention will appear when the following description is considered in connection with the appended drawings in which, Figure 1 is a front elevation showing the blind of my present invention in place on a window II frame or casing. In this view the blind is shown fully lowered but the strips are closed.

Figure 2 is a view similar to Figure 1 but showing the blind strips in their fully opened position.

Figure 3 is a cross-sectional view taken on the plane of the line 3-3 of Figure 2 showing the mode of supporting the blind structure from a shade roller and showing likewise the position of the strips with respect to their pivot points.

Figure 4 is an enlarged view similar to Figure 3 showing particularly the details of the manner of suspending the strips from the shade roller and the details of the means for operating the blind strips from one position to another.

Figure 5 is a cross-sectional view of the blind structure of Figures 1 and 2 taken on the plane of the line 5-5 of Figure 2 and showing particularly the mode for operating the blind structure from one position to another, together with the details of the construction of the bottom bar in order to permit the strips of one group to raise a greater amount than those of the other as is necessary in view of the fact that the outer strips are wound upon a greater radius than the inner ones.

Figure 6 is a view similar to Figure 5 but showing the blind in a partially closed position.

Figure 7 is a fragmentary cross-sectional view of the blind structure taken on the plane of the line 7-7 of Figure 8 and showing the details of the mode of pivoting the blind strips to the bottom bar.

Figure 8 is a fragmentary cross-sectional view taken on the plane of the line 8-8 of Figure 7 and showing details of the means for pivoting the blind strips and particularly details of the mode of mounting the blind strips for simultaneous pivotal operation.

Figure 9 is a cross-sectional view of the blind structure taken on the plane of the line 8-9 of 5 Figure 2 and showing particularly the mode of connecting the blind strips together in groups for assuring that the pivotal operation at the upper end of the strips be simultaneous.

Figure 10 is a fragmentary detailed elevational view of the upper portion of the blind structure a showing the manner of attaching the blind strips to a fabric member which is in turn mounted upon the shade roller.

Figure 11 is a fragmentary sectional view of a single blind strip and its supporting member showing in greater detail than Figure 10 the manner of supporting this strip from the shade roller. This view is taken on the plane of line I I-- of Figure 10.

Figure 12 is a front elevation of a second form of my improved blind structure in which the strips of each group are mounted upon a shade roller. This view also shows in the broken away portion, the arrangement of a spring in the common spring shade roller, which arrangement may be utilized in either this structure or that of Figure 1.

Figure 13 is a cross-sectional view taken on the plane of the line 13-13 of Figure 12 illustrating the mode of mounting the two groups of fabric strips each upon its own shade roller.

Figure 14 is a fragmentary transverse crosssectional view showing the blind strips in openposition and illustrating in detail a mode of pivotally attaching the blind strips to the members which control the opening and closing thereof.

Figure 15 is a fragmentary cross-sectional view taken on the plane of the line I5-15 of Figure 14 further illustrating the mode of pivotally attaching'the blind strips to the control members.

Figure 16 is a fragmentary cross-sectional view taken on the plane of the line 16-16 of Figure 14 illustrating a mode of pivotally attaching the blind strips to the bottom bar. It is to be noted that this mode of attaching is a substitute for that shown in Figures 5, 6 and 7 and that the two modes may be interchangeably utilized.

Figure 17 is a cross-sectional view of the blind of Figure 12 with the blind open, however, rather than closed as shown in Figure 12.

Figure 18 is a view generally similar to Figure 17 but showing the blind structure in its closed position. This view is taken on the plane of the line 18-18 of Figure 13. Figure 19 is a bottom plan view of the structure of Figure 12 showing particularly details of the construction of the bottom bar.

Figure 20 is a fragmentary transverse crosssectional view of the bottom bar of Figures 17, 18 and 19 further illustrating the mode of pivotally connecting the blind strips to this bottom bar.

Figure 21 is a fragmentary front elevation of a blind such as that of Figures 1 and 2 illustrating particularly a different form of bottom bar for permitting relative movement between the two groups of fabric strips as the blind is wound upon the shade roller.

Figure 22 is a cross-sectional view of the structure of Figure 21 illustrating the details 05 thereof. This cross-section is taken on the plane of the line 22-22 of Figure 21, and shows the relative positions of the parts of the unit when the shade structure is in its fully lowered position. Figure 23 is a further view of the bottom bar arrangement of Figure 21 showing the details of construction thereof. This view is taken on the plane of the line 23-23 of Figure 22.

Figure 24 is a view generally similar to Figure 76 22 but illustrates the positions of the parts of the bottom bar arrangement when the blind has been rolled upon the shade roller.

Figure 25 is a front elevation partially in longitudinal section showing a construction in which the pivot for each blind strip includes a spring which makes it possible for the blind strips to move independently of each other and thereby compensate for any slight variation in length between the blind strips as well as permitting the strips of one group to rise above those of the other when wound upon the shade roller.

Figure 26 is a view generally similar to the view of the structure of Figure 25 but showing the bottom bar in plan rather than elevation. This figure is taken on the plane of the line 26-26 of Figure 25.

Figure 27 is a view generally similar to Figure 26 but showing a portion of the bottom bar structure in cross-section. It also differs from Figure 26 in that the structure is shown with the parts in the positions corresponding to open position of the blind strips.

Figure 28 is a fragmentary cross-sectional view of the modified bottom bar structure of Figure 25 showing in detail a mode of fastening a control cord to the spools arranged upon the pivotal centers of the blind strips.

Figure 29 is a longitudinal cross-sectional view of the bottom bar structure of Figures 25 and 26 showing particularly the manner in which the various control cords are attached to a manually operable control member.

Figure 30 is a further illustration of the mechanism of Figure 29, this figure being taken on the plane of the line 30-30 of Figure 29.

Figure 31 is a fragmentary cross-sectional view of the bottom bar of Figures 25 and 26 showing the positions of the parts when the blind has been wound upon the shade roller.

Figure 32 is a fragmentary cross-sectional view of a modified form of the bottom bar of Figures 25 and 26 showing particularly the mode of causing rotation of the blind strips through the medium of gears and rack segments instead of through the mode of control cords such as those illustrated in Figures 25 through 31.

Figure 33 is a fragmentary cross-sectional view of the structure of Figure 32, the view being taken on the plane of the line 33-33 of Figure 32 and showing additional details of the modified -bottom bar structure of Figure 32.

Referring now to Figure 1, there is illustrated a window casing 10 on which at the top are mounted the usual spring shade roller brackets II which support a spring shade roller 12 in the usual manner. While not shown in this view the spring is identical with that shown at 19 in Figure 12. Affixed to the shade roller 12 in any suitable way, as by tacking, is a fabric strip 13 which is of substantially the same width as the window opening and the shade roller, and the length of which is variable to render it possible to fit a considerable range of window lengths with one size of blind. Pivoted to this fabric strip in a manner to be hereinafter described are a plurality of blind strips which, as has been indicated, are suspended in two groups, those of one group being designated 14 and those of the second group 15. These blind strips may be of any suitable fabric, as for example silk ribbon, oiled silk, "Tontine," lace, or any other material which is decorative and desirable in a structure of this type. As has been indicated, the strips 14 and 15 are pivotally hung from the fabric strip 13. In the instance illustrated pivot points for the strips are not located at the centers of the strips but are rather some distance to the side so that when the strips are rotated, those of one group in one direction and those of the other in the reverse direction, interference between the strips will be avoided. The depending strips are pivotally connected at the bottoms thereof to a bottom bar 16 which bottom bar carries thereupon the control cords 17 and 18. These cords control the opening and closing movements of the blind structure, this control being exerted through the medium of the members 20 and 21.

The positions of the various parts to operate the blind structure and to rotate the fabric strips to their open position are shown particularly in Figure 2.

In Figure 3 the structure of Figures 1 and 2 is shown in cross-section in order to clearly bring out the fact that the strips are pivoted, as indicated at 22 and 23, at points not on the center lines of the respective strips.

The method of pivotally hanging the strips 14 and 15 from the fabric or shade strip 13 is best illustrated by reference to Figures 4, 10 and 11. It will be seen by reference to these figures that each strip is supplied at its top edge with a wire or other stiffening member 24 which extends across the strip and is sewn into a loop of the fabric. At the point 23 at which the strip is to be pivoted, the fabric of the strip itself is cut away for a short distance. The fabric sheet or strip 13 is formed with a thickened portion near the bottom, this thickening being produced by folding the fabric upwardly about a wire 25 and thereafter again folding the fabric upon itself so that it extends downwardly and sewing the two reverse bends thus formed into position as is indicated at 26 particularly in'Figure 11. The fabric 13 then extends downwardly and is bent upwardly as indicated at 27, this fold being held in position by sewing as indicated at 28. The pivotal connection between the fabric strip 13 and each strip 14 or 15 is then made in the following manner. The two ends of a cord 30 are passed through a hole in the base of a small metal channel member 31 and extended in opposite directions through this member, as is indicated in Figure 10. Thereafter the channel member is squeezed together to firmly hold the cord ends. The loop of the cord 30 is then passed through the hole 32 in the fabric blind strip 14 or 15 as the case may be and the channel member passed through the loop thereby affixing the cord to the wire 24. Next the channel member is passed upwardly through a hole 33 in the bottom of the loop 27 of member 13 thereby causing the cord to extend upwardly between the two sides of the loop in the bottom of member 13.

Following this the channel member 31 is passed through a hole 34 in the rearmost two of the three thicknesses of material 13 at the point where this material is looped back upon itself as has been previously described. The cord passes over the wire 25 and at this time the channel member is positioned with its long axis parallel to the wire 25 thereby pivotally affixing the cord and, of course, the blind strip to the fabric member 13.

The mode of pivoting the blind strip to the fabric suspending member 13, is, of course, variable at will there being any number of arrangements by which this may be done. In this connection, it is pointed out that the use of a tape such as those shown in my Patent No. 2,173,275 above mentioned Is entirely feasible and that if this is to be done the tapes would be fastened to the roller in the manner shown in that patent. the fabric member 13. if used at all, being used merely to hide the rather unsightly long tapes.

In addition, if the tapes of my prior patent are to be utilized and are to be effective to cause the pivoting operation, it is to be understood that the 45° angle upon which tapes are to be fastened to the roller must be in reverse direction for one set of tapes as compared to that of the same angle for the other set of tapes. Also it is preferable in, case these tapes are utilized to use the cord controlled roller arrangement of the prior patent rather than the spring shade roller shown herein since this arrangement provides a time interval prior to the elevation of the blind during which the rotation of the strips to their closed position may be effected.

Further in connection with this pivotal arrangement of the fabric blind strips, it is to be understood that the depending "skirt" portion of member 13 is solely for the purpose of enhancing the decorative value of the structure. The fabric strips 14 and 15 are likewise pivotally connected to the bottom bar 16. In the illustrations of Figures 1 through 11, one mode of forming the pivotal connection between the bottom bar 16 and the fabric strips is shown. This mode comprises cotter pins 35, the eyes of which surround a stiffening wire 36 which extends through a loop sewn in the bottom of the fabric blind strip 14 or 15 in the same manner as was described in connection with the loop surround33 ing the wire 24 at the top of the strip. It will be clear from the above description that the blind strips 14 and 15 are pivotally mounted at both top and bottom, the pivot points being vertically in line although in the embodiment shown not on the center line of the strips.

It should be mentioned at this point that the bottom bar 16 is formed of two main parts 37 and 38 which are independently movable. In the particular embodiment shown the two parts 37 and 38 are dovetailed together (see Figures 5 and 6). All of the blind strips of one group as, for example, 15 are pivotally connected to part 37 of the bottom bar 16, whereas all of the strips of the other group 14 are pivotally connected to the "o part 38. Since the blind strips 15 overlap blind strips 14 at their edges, it will be clear that in rolling upon the roller, blind strips 15 are wound upon an arc of a greater radius than are strips 14 and would consequently be wound somewhat '' more rapidly. It is for this reason that the member 16 is made in two parts 37 and 38 thus providing for more rise of the strips 15 as compared with the strips 14.

While the above has described modes of pivott;o ing the fabric strips to the top member 13 and the bottom bar 16. no means of pivotally operating these strips has as yet been considered. One mode of performing' this function is illustrated in considerable detail in Figures 5 through 8 and (; is, furthermore, shown generally in the remaining figures of the group comprising Figures 1 through 11.

Referring now to Figure 5, it will be seen that each strip 14 or 15 has inserted in it at the lower 7o end and adjacent the wire or stiffening member 36 a cotter pin 40, these cotter pins simply passing through the fabric in the same manner in which a pin would be inserted, it being understood, of course, that the cotter pin being much thicker must have holes provided for such insertion in the manner shown particularly in Figure 8. The eyer of these cotter pins interlink with eyes of additional cotter pins 41 which latter hang vertically and extend through and are pivotally fixed in the respective control bars 20 and 21. In this manner, the outer ends of the strips 14 are connected to the bar 21 and those of the strips 15 to the bar 20. Thus upon moving either bar the strips associated therewith will be caused to rotate about their pivot points from an open to a closed position or vice versa.

In order to move the bars, there are provided two cords one of which, designated 44 in the drawings, has one end fastened to bar 21 and the other to bar 20, the loop 18 of the cord then passing through a hole in the member 16 and extending downwardly. This cord is used to cause a closing movement of the blind structure. By pulling upon the loop of the cord, the two bars and 21 are caused to move downwardly, as seen in Figure 5, causing the blind strips 15 to rotate counterclockwise and the strips 14 to rotate clockwise to their closed positions. The second cord 45 is attached to two of the blind strips (those at the upper end as seen in Figure 5) one end of the cord being attached to each of the blind strips and the loop 17 extending downwardly through a hole in the member 16. A pull exerted upon this cord will cause the two blind strips to operate in opposite directions to their open position and since they are connected to each of the two bars 20 and 21 will result in an opening movement of all of the strips simultaneously. The positions of the cords 44 and 45 and control bars 20 and 21 when the blind is operated to its semi-open position are shown in Figure 6 and the details of the construction of the control bar as well as of the bottom bar are shown in Figures 7 and 8, Figure 7 particularly illustrating the condition which exists when the blind has been rolled upon the shade roller 12 to its uppermost position wherein the two parts 37 and 38 of the bar 16 are displaced with respect to each other.

The blind strips are interconnected in groups at the top in much the same fashion as at the bottom although the construction shown differs slightly and is lighter than is the construction at the bottom which exercises the control.

Referring now to Figure 9, it will be seen that the blind strips 15 are connected together at their forward edges by means of a member 46 and are spaced along this member by means of the members 47. In the particular embodiment discussed, the member 46, as is best seen in Figure 10, is a cord which extends from the left hand blind strip of the group 15 to the right hand strip 15. Folded over this cord between each two strips and occupying substantially all of the space between the two is the spacing member 47 above mentioned which In this particular instance is of shade cloth and which is sewn together after being folded over the cord.

The strips 14 are interconnected in the same manner by means of members 48 and 50 (Figure 9). This construction assures equal rotative movement of all the strips at the top and prevents unequal torsional stresses applied to the members from being effective to cause unequal rotative movement of the tops of the blind strips.

It should be noted that by exerting a tension upon one side of the loop 17 or one side of the loop 18 after the blind strips have passed the halfway point in their opening movement, one of the groups of strips may be rotated independently of the other thereby bringing the strips of the two groups into parallel planes. This mode of operation is advantageous in that it makes it possible to cut off direct rays of light falling upon the blind at any angle other than perpendicular while the blind is open thus admitting air without admitting direct sunlight.

A second form of the invention is shown in Figures 12 through 20. In this form the two groups of blind strips 14 and 15 are mounted upon separate rollers 60 and 61 which may be and preferably are rotatably mounted upon the same pair of brackets 62. In Figure 12 these rollers are of the spring driven type and one roller is broken away to show its spring IS. These two rollers 60 and S6 may be two spring shade rollers adjusted so that they will operate in synchronism, or one of the two rollers may be a spring roller and the second roller be geared thereto to assure synchronous operation of the two. Furthermore, both rollers may be of such a type that no spring is required, operation being by means of a pulley or the like in which instance also it is preferable that the second roller be geared to the pulley driven roller.

In any event, the fabric suspending member 13 is dispensed with and in place thereof fabric strips 63 and 64 are mounted on the rollers. The blind strips 14 and 15 are then respectively suspended from the strips 63 and 64, the suspension being by means of cords 65 and 66 which are generally similar to the cord 30 mentioned in connection with Figure 11. The cords 65 and 66 are fixed to the strips 14, 15, 63 and 64 in a manner substantially identical with the mode by which cord 30 is affixed to the fabric member 13 and to the strips 14 and 15 and, therefore, no further description of this arrangement is given here.

The bottom bar utilized in connection with the two roller construction now being described differs considerably from that mentioned above.

One reason for this difference in construction lies in the fact that since the strips 14 and 15 are rolled upon separate rollers 60 and 81 there is no Sneed for making the bottom bar in two parts.

Aside from this feature, however, the bottom bar of Figures 1 through 11 might be substituted for the one about to be described. The bottom bar ,0 construction illustrated in Figures 13 through 19 comprises a strip of wood or the like 67 having a groove 68 in its base and a plurality of holes 10 extending from the groove upwardly to the top.

A cord 71 lies in the groove 68 and loops of the cord extend upwardly through the holes 70, these loops encompassing stiffening wires 72 which pass through loops formed in the bottom of the blind strips 14 and 15. This arrangement permits, through a mere readjustment of the cord, of adjustment to compensate for any slight variations in the length of the blind strips which may occur in manufacture. Thus in assembling the unit it is only necessary to make the cord of the proper overall length so that the bottom bar member 67 may be horizontal. In this connection attention is called to Figures 16 and 20 in one of which, namely, Figure 16 is shown the arrangement when the blind is open and in the other of which the position of the parts when the blind is closed and, in addition, in one of which (Figure 16) the strips are shown as of equal length whereas in the other (Figure 20) the strips are shown as of unequal length, the cord 71 compensating for such differences in length. This compensation may also be secured by altering the length of the pivoting members at the top of the shade structure.

The mode of forming the control members utilized in this form of construction is somewhat different from that used in connection with the previous embodiment of my invention although it will be understood that either construction may be used in either form of the invention. In the instant form of the invention, the blind strips are folded back upon themselves at the base, are slit near the forward edges as concerns group 15 and near the rearward edges as concerns group 14, and a tab 73 of material is passed through the slit and adhered to the fabric of the blind strip as is most clearly shown in Figures 14 and 15.

Each of the control members designated 74 and 75 comprises a bar 76 or 77 of wood or other suitable material about which there is wrapped a fabric covering 78 or 80. In general these fabric strips would be of the same material as the blind strips to enhance the overall appearance of the structure. The tabof material 73 above mentioned at its other end extends into a slit 81 in the fabric covering 78 or 80 of the member 74 or 15 and is fixed in position by means of glue or other suitable adhesive. The tab 73 is, of course, bent to form a right angle when the fabric blind structure is in its fully open position and is in essence a pivotal connection serving the same purpose as the one described above in connection with the first form of my invention. In the second form of the invention now being described, control cords similar in arrangement to those previously described are utilized. However, as shown in Figures 17, 18, 19 and 20, these cords are designated 82 and 83 are both connected to the control bars 76 and 77 rather than being connected one set to the control bars and the other directly to the blind strips 14 and 15. As will be clear from a study of the figures above mentioned, the use of the light wooden control bars with their fabric covering contributes to a lighter, more compact structure at the bottom of the blind and, therefore, contributes to an improved appearance of the blind as a whole.

A third mode of construction of the bottom bar is illustrated in Figures 21 through 24. This bottom bar arrangement may be utilized with either of the two structures described above although in view of the fact that it has means for compensating for the difference in wind'ng radius of the two sets of strips, it is necessary to utilize such a form only in connection with the single shade roller device of Figures 1 thrcugh 11. The modified form of bottom bar of Figures 21 through 24 comprises a cylindrical member 84 (see Figures 23 and 24). This cylinder is grooved at spaced points along its length as indicated particularly at 85 (see Figure 23). Folded over the member 84 with its ends extending upwardly is a piece of fabric similar to, if not identical, with the fabric from which the bl'nd strips themselves are constructed, this material being designated in the drawings as 86. The blind strips of the groups 14 and 15 are fastened to the upper turned over edges of the member 86 by passing a cord extending from the stiffening wire, through the lower edge of the blind strip 14 or 15, through a hole in the bent over portion 87 of the fabric, and turning the channel member affixed to the cord ends parallel to the fabric so that it cannot pull back through the hole, in much the same manner as was described in connection with the pivoting of the upper ends of the fabric strips in connection with Figure 1. The fabric 88 is not fastened to the member 84 In any way other than as is about to be described since it is necessary that a slight degree of rotation be permitted in order that the two sets a of blind strips may become relatively displaced as they are wound upon the different radii, as has been explained above. Fabric 86 is loosely fastened to the cylindrical member 84 in the following manner: One end of a cord 89 having a channel shaped member fastened to either end thereof is passed through a hole or slot such as 87 in the fabric 86 so that the channel member rests against the interior of the fabric as may be seen particularly in Figure 23 wherein the r, channel member mentioned is designated 88. The second end of the cord 89 with its channel member affixed thereto extends through the hole 81, thence over a stiffening wire SI, one of which lies in each upper loop of the fabric 8, to the interior of the large loop of fabric 88. The cord is then wound around the member 84 within the groove 85 and from there is threaded through a hole 91 in the upper folded portion of the fabric 86 on the side opposite to that at which the threading was commenced. This second end of cord 89 passes over the second stiffening member 90 and thence through a hole In the fabric 86 directly beneath the hole 1I and terminates at this point, the channel member being now positioned sideways so that the cord cannot slip back through the last mentioned hole. This mode of fastening the fabric to the cylinder 84 permits the fabric to rotate within limits and thus to adjust for the different amounts of elevation of the two groups of fabric blind strips 14 and 15 as the blind is rotated upon the shade roller.

A further form of bottom bar is shown in Figures 25 through 31. In this form the bar comprises upper and lower plates Iii and III which bars are spaced apart and connected by the blocks 102 spaced along the length of the bar, as is seen particularly in Figure 27. At spaced points along these two bars are the strip rotating members or shafts 103 which are connected 4 to the blind strips, the connection being made by passing a fold at the bottom of the blind strip thrqugh a slot in the upper end of the shaft 103 and thereafter inserting the stiffening wire 104 in the blind strip where it lies in an enlarged portion of the slot in the shaft 183. Each shaft 103 is supported in the plates III and III, the shaft extending through holes in the plate 100 and being supported from the plate 101 by means of a headed rod 105 which extends through a 5 hole in the bottom plate and into a cavity formed in the bottom of the shaft 183. Affixed to each shaft 103 near its bottom end is a pulley 106 and extending between the top edge of the pulley and the lower edge of the plate 100 is a spring 107 Swhich presses the pulley and the shaft 103 downwardly. By virtue of this arrangement any difference in length of the blind strips is compensated for by the compression of the associated spring 107. In order that the blind strips may n5 be rotated from their open to their closed positions and vice versa, cords 108, 109 and 1I are provided. The pair of cords 108 extends upwardly through the bottom plate 101 and through a hole in one of the blocks 102 and thence divides, one going to either side of the bottom bar structure and extending longitudinally of the structure for a short distance to the left, as seen in Figure 26, at which they pass through horizontal openings in a second block 182 and downwardly 7y through a hole in the bottom bar structure joining together before passing through the latter hole. At their left end, as seen in Figure 29, the two cords are fastened into a horizontal shaft I 12 which is suitably supported ii a bearing member affixed to the bottom plate and which at its outer end, that is, bottom as seen in Figures 26 and 27, carries a knob 113 by means of which the pair of cords may be caused to move toward the left, as seen in Figure 29. The right hand end of the cords, as has been stated, extends downwardly and is utilized for causing movement of the cords toward the right, as seen in Figure 29, as well as for the purpose of lowering the entire blind structure.

Extending along the plates 100 and 101 are the side bars 114 and 115, these bars riding on the edges of the lower plate 101. One of the cords 168 is connected to bar 114 and the other to bar I I, as may be best seen by reference to Figure 27. Bar 114 has affixed to it a cord 116 which cord extends from one end of the bar to the other, a single turn of the cord being taken about each alternate one of the pulleys 106. In a similar manner a cord 17 extends from one end of the bar I15 to the other, this cord having a turn thereof about each of the remaining ones of the pulleys '10S. It will be seen that when the knob I 13 is turned in either direction the pair of cords 0I will be wound upon it and will cause the two bars 114 and I15 to move to the left as seen in Figures 25 through 29. Such movement of the bars will cause like movement of the associated cords II1 and IIT which cords in their movement will cause the shafts 103 to be rotated half in one direction and half in the opposite. As shown in Figure 27 for example, movement of the bars to the left will cause the first, third, fifth, etc. (from the left) of the shafts 103 to rotate in a counterclockwise direction, and the second, fourth, sixth, etc. to rotate in a clockwise direction. A pull upon the ends of the cords I08 opposite from the knob 113 and shaft 112 will cause an opposite movement of the bars 114 and I15 and opposite rotation of the various shafts 103. As is best seen in Figure 28, the cords 116 and I 17 are affixed to the alternate pulleys by passing a brad or nail 118 through the cord and into the corresponding pulley.

The bottom bar structure immediately above described may be somewhat modified in the following manner and as is shown particularly in Figures 32 and 33. In this arrangement the pulleys 106 instead of being fixed to the shafts 103 are affixed for rotation with the headed rods 105, these headed rods being made of square crosssection from the interior wall of the plate 101 to their termination. In addition, in this structure the springs 107 extend from the upper plate 100 to a shoulder 120 formed on each of the shafts 103. Further the pulleys 106 are replaced by gears 121 and the cords 116 and 117 are eliminated there being substituted therefor rack segments 122 and 123, the rack segments 122 meshing with alternate ones of the gears 121 and the segments 123 with the remaining gears 121.

From the above it will be clear that when the knob 113 is rotated and the bars moved in one direction, as for example to the left in Figure 33, the first, third, fifth, etc. shafts 103 will be rotated in a counterclockwise direction, while the second, fourth, sixth, etc. shafts will be rotated in a clockwise direction. Also a pull upon the loose ends of the cords 108 will cause movement of the bars I 1 and IT to the right which will, of course, carry with them the rack segments 122 and 123 and cause the first, third, fifth, etc. shafts 103 to rotate in a clockwise direction and the second, fourth, sixth, etc. shafts 180 in a counterclockwise direction.

While I have described preferred forms of my invention and preferred formations of the various accessories which may be utilized therewith, it is understood that the invention itself may be Smodified and that, furthermore, many additional modifications of the various accessories described may be made. Consequently, I wish it to be understood that no limitation is to be implied from the foregoing description and that the scope of my invention is to be determined solely by the appended claims.

What is claimed is: 1. In a Venetian blind structure of the class described, in combination, a plurality of blind Sstrips arranged in parallel planes when the blind is closed and divided into two groups, the strips of one group alternating with those of the other, the edges of the strips of one group overlapping the edges of the strips of the other group when the blind is closed, means supporting said strips for oscillation about vertical axes and means for causing oscillation of said strips about said axes from open to closed and closed to open position, said means causing oscillation of the strips of one group in one direction and those of the other group in the opposite direction to open or close the blind.

2. In a Venetian blind structure of the class described, in combination, a roller, a plurality of blind strips pivotally attached to said roller, said strips lying in parallel planes when the blind is closed, said strips being divided into two groups, the strips of one group alternating with those of the other, the edges of the strips of one group overlapping the edges of the strips of the other group when the blind is closed, means for causing oscillation of said strips about their pivotal supports from open to closed and closed to open position, said means causing oscillation of the strips of one group in one direction and those of the other group in the opposite direction to open or close the blind, and means for rotating said roller to wind the strips thereupon, the relationship of said strips causing these strips to wind evenly upon said roller.

3. In a Venetian blind structure of the class described, in combination, a plurality of blind strips arranged in parallel planes when the blind is closed and divided into two groups, the strips of one group alternating with those of the other, the edges of the strips of one group overlapping the edges of the strips of the other group when the blind is closed, means for supporting said strips for oscillation about vertical axes, the edge of any strip being differently spaced from its axis than is the adjacent edge of the adjoining strip from its axis, and means for causing oscillation of said strips about said axes from open to closed and closed to open position, said means causing oscillation of the strips of one group in one direction and those of the other group in the opposite direction to open or close the blind.

4. In a Venetian blind structure of the class described, in combination, a roller, a plurality of blind strips pivotally attached to said roller, said strips lying in parallel planes when the blind is closed, said strips being divided into two groups, the strips of one group alternating with those of the other, the edges of the strips of one group overlapping the edges of the strips of the other group when the blind is closed, means for supporting said strips for oscillation about vertical axes, the edge of any strip being differently spaced from its axis than is the adjacent edge of the adjoining strip from its axis, and means for causing oscillation of said strips about said axes from open to closed and closed to open position, said means causing oscillation of the strips of one group in one direction and those of the other group in the opposite direction to open or close the blind.

5. In a Venetian blind structure of the class described, in combination, a roller, a fabric member attached to said roller, a plurality of blind strips pivotally suspended from said fabric member, said blind strips being arranged in parallel planes when the blind is closed and divided into two groups, the strips of one group alternating with those of the other, the edges of the strips of one group overlapping the edges of the strips of the other group when the blind is closed, means for causing oscillation of said blind strips on said pivotal suspensions from open to closed and closed to open position, said means causing oscillation of the strips of one group in one direction and those of the other group in the opposite direction to open or close the blind.

6. In a Venetian blind structure of the class described, in combination, a roller, a fabric member attached to said roller, a plurality of blind strips pivotally suspended from said fabric member, said points of pivotal suspension being off center with respect to the blind strips, said blind strips being arranged in parallel planes when the blind is closed and divided into two groups, the strips of one group alternating with those of the other, the edges of the strips of one group overlapping the edges of the strips of the other group when the blind is closed, means for causing oscillation of said blind strips on said pivotal suspensions from open to closed and closed to open position, said means causing oscillation of the strips of one group in one direction and those of the other group in the opposite direction to open or close the blind.

7. In a Venetian blind structure of the class described, in combination, a roller, a fabric member fixed to said roller and adapted to wind thereon, a plurality of blind strips pivotally suspended from said fabric member, said strips being arranged in two groups, the strips of one group alternating with those of the other and the edges of the strips of one group overlapping those of the strips of the other when the blind is closed and the pivot points of the strips of one group being displaced from the center line of the strips in one direction and the pivot points of the strips of the other group being displaced from their center lines in the opposite direction, a bar suspended from said fabric strips at the lower end thereof, means carried by said bar for causing oscillation of the said strips about their axes from open to closed and closed to open position, said means causing oscillation of the strips of one group in one direction and those of the other group in the opposite direction to open or close the blind.

8. In a Venetian blind structure of the class described, in combination, a roller, a fabric member fixed to said roller and adapted to wind thereon, a plurality of blind strips pivotally suspended from said fabric member, said strips being arranged in two groups, the strips of one group alternating with those of the other and the edges of the strips of one group overlapping those of the strips of the other when the blind is closed and the pivot points of the strips of one group being displaced from the center line of the strips in one direction and the pivot points of the strips of the other group being displaced from their center lines in the opposite direction, a bar suspended from said fabric strips at the lower end thereof, means carried by said bar for causing oscillation of the said strips about their axes from open to closed and closed to open position, said means causing oscillation of the strips of one group in one direction and those of the other group in the opposite direction to open or close the blind, and means to operate said roller to wind said fabric member and said blind strips thereupon, said bottom bar being in two parts vertically displaceable with respect to each other to cause said bottom bar to retain its horizontal position during winding of said strips upon said roller in two groups having different winding radii.

9. In a Venetian blind structure of the class described, in combination, a spring roller adapted for attachment to a window casing, a fabric member mounted upon said spring roller and adapted to be wound thereon, a plurality of blind strips, said strips being divided into two groups, the strips of one group alternating with those of the other, means pivotally suspending said strips from said fabric member, the points of suspension of one group of strips being off center in one direction and those of the other group of 85 strips being off center in the opposite direction, a bottom bar pivotally suspended from the said strips at the bottoms thereof at points vertically in alignment with the upper suspension points, means connecting the lower portions of each group of strips together, means connecting the upper portions of each group of strips together, and means comprising cords passing through said bottom bar and connected to the said means for 45 joining the lower edges of the strips together for controlling the rotational movement of said strips about their pivot points to cause opening or closing movement of the blind structure, the strips of the two groups overlapping each other at their edges when the blind is fully closed and lying in parallel planes at such times.

10. In a Venetian blind structure of the class described, in combination, a pair of rollers, a plurality of blind strips divided into two groups, the strips of one group being pivotally suspended from one of said pair of rollers, and the strips of the second group being pivotally suspended from the other of said pair of rollers, said strips being adapted to wind upon said rollers, the strips of each group being spaced apart on its roller, those of one group alternating with those of the other with their edges overlapping when the blind is closed, said pivotal suspensions being located off center with respect to the axes of the strips, and means for causing oscillation of the strips of one group in one direction and those of the other group in the opposite direction from closed to open and open to closed position.

11. In a Venetian blind structure of the class described, in combination, a pair of rollers, a plurality of blind strips divided into two groups, the strips of one group being pivotally suspended from one of said pair of rollers, and the strips of the second group being pivotally suspended 7s from the other of said pair of rollers, said strips being adapted to wind upon said rollers, the strips of each group being spaced apart on its roller, those of one group alternating with those of the other with their edges overlapping when the blind is closed, said pivotal suspensions being located off center with respect to the axes of the strips, a bottom bar, said strips being pivotally connected to said bottom bar, the connection points being directly vertically beneath said upper suspension points, and means for causing oscillation of the strips of one group in one direction and those of the other group in the opposite direction from closed to open and open to closed position.

12. In a Venetian blind structure of the class described, in combination, a pair of rollers mounted for operation in opposite directions, a plurality of blind strips divided into two groups, the strips of one group being pivotally suspended from one of said pair of rollers, and the strips of the second group being pivotally suspended from the other of said pair of rollers, said strips being adapted to wind upon their associated rollers and being tangent to said rollers at the adjacent faces thereof, the strips of each group being spaced apart on its roller, these of one group alternating with those of the other with their edges overlapping when the blind is closed, said pivotal suspensions being located off center with respect to the axes of the strips, a bottom bar, said strips being pivotally connected to said bottom bar, the connection points being directly vertically beneath said upper suspension points, control members, one fastened to the outer edges of each group of strips, and means for reciprocating said control members to cause oscillation of the strips of one group in one direction and those of the other ,group in the opposite direction to open or close the blind.

13. In a Venetian blind structure of the class described, in combination a pair of spring rollers, a plurality of blind strips divided into two groups, the strips of one group being pivotally suspended from one of said pair of rollers, and the strips of the second group being pivotally suspended from the other of said pair of rollers, said strips being adapted to wind upon said rollers, the strips of each group being spaced apart on its roller, those of one group alternating with those of the other with their edges overlapping when the blind is closed, said pivotal suspensions being located off center with respect to the axes of the strips, a bottom bar, said strips being pivotally connected to said bottom bar, the connection points being directly vertically beneath said upper suspension points, control members, one fastened to the outer edges of each group of strips, and means for reciprocating said control members to cause oscillation of the strips of one group in one direction and those of the other group in the opposite direction to open or close the blind, said means for operating said blind strips to closed position also serving as a pull cord for releasing said rollers and thereby initiating winding of the closed blind strips upon said rollers.

14. A bottom bar construction for a Venetian blind having vertically disposed blind strips, comprising, in combination, a cylindrical member having a plurality of grooves therein, a fabric covering for said cylindrical member, said covering being in the form of a loop of material in which said cylindrical member lies, the upwardly extending portions of said fabric being pivotally connected to the blind strips, and means comprising cords connected to and passing through said fabric and wrapped in said grooves for holding said fabric and said cylindrical member loosely together and providing for vertical movement of the ends of the fabric with respect to each other.

15. A bottom bar structure for a Venetian blind having vertically disposed blind strips, comprising, in combination, a pair of plates spaced apart, a plurality of shafts rotatably mounted in said plates, said shafts being attached at their upper ends to the fabric strips of the blind structure, pulleys fixed on said shafts, spring means bearing against said pulleys and said upper plate to press said shafts toward their lowermost positions, a bar mounted on each side of said plates, cords extending the length of said bars and passing around alternate ones of said pulleys, and manually operable means for reciprocating said cords and said bars to thereby rotate said shafts in opposite directions for opening and closing said blind.

16. A bottom bar structure for a Venetian blind having vertically disposed blind strips, comprising, in combination, a pair of plates spaced apart, a plurality of shafts rotatably mounted in said plates, said shafts being attached at their upper 45 ends to the fabric strips of the blind structure, gears fixed on said shaft, collars on said shafts, spring means extending between said collars and said upper plates to press said shafts toward their lower positions, a bar mounted on each side of said plates, rack segments mounted on said bars, the segments on one bar cooperating with alternate ones of said gears and those on the other bar with the remaining ones of said gears, and manually operable means for reciprocating said bars gg and rack segments to thereby rotate said shafts in opposite directions for opening and closing of said blind.

WALTER HOUMbRE.