Title:
Blood pressure cuff
United States Patent 2332488


Abstract:
The object of my invention is to provide a novel better blood pressure cuff for use with the conventional rubber inflation bag and tubing for inflation 'bulb and recording instrument for ascertaining the blood-pressure of patients. It is an especial object of my invention to provide a device...



Inventors:
Lee, Newton Dennis
Application Number:
US45930742A
Publication Date:
10/19/1943
Filing Date:
09/22/1942
Assignee:
Lee, Newton Dennis
Primary Class:
Other Classes:
606/202
International Classes:
A61B17/135
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Description:

The object of my invention is to provide a novel better blood pressure cuff for use with the conventional rubber inflation bag and tubing for inflation 'bulb and recording instrument for ascertaining the blood-pressure of patients. It is an especial object of my invention to provide a device of this character that can be quickly applied and removed, and which adjusts itself when applied to fit any arm or leg.

It is also an object of the invention to provide a structure that can be securely fastened and will not slip.

I attain these and other objects of my invention by the mechanism illustrated in the accompanying drawing, in which- 1 Figure 1 is a view of the cuff in the rolled up position it assumes when applied to the arm of a patient; Fig. 2 is a view of the back of the cuff in extended position, with a portion broken away to save space on the sheet; Fig. 3 is a view of the inside of the cuff in extended position with a portion of the cuff broken away to save space on the sheet; 25 Fig. 4 is an edge view of the metal rod 4 and its reversely bent end portion 7; Fig. 5 is a face view of the end bar 8 and its hook 9; Fig. 6 is an end elevation of one of the end bars and its hook.

Like characters of reference indicate like parts in all views.

Referring to the accompanying drawing, my better blood pressure cuff is made of suitable fabric with spaced transverse reinforcing bars.

It has a section of fabric I, forming the face of the cuff. The back of the cuff has a main fabric section 2b over which are stitched two relatively narrow fabric sections 2a and 2b, each of their inner longitudinal edges spaced a short distance apart. The sections 2a and 2b are folded and stitched along the dotted lines in Figs. 1 and 2 to provide the opposite narrow pockets 3 as shown in Figs. 1 and 2. In these pockets 3 are mounted the transversely disposed spaced metal rods 4 which have their end portions 7 reversely bent to seat in the narrow continuation pocket 6, as illustrated in the drawing. The cuff is preferably made of a single strip of fabric folded and stitched, as shown in the drawing. As shown in the drawing, the spaced metal rods 4 extend substantially the entire width of the fabric. This is important since thereby these transverse rods 4, when the bag within the fabric is inflated, cause it to remain flat over the artery for the full width of the cuff (five inches), and this is important as the applicant, who is a physician, wishes to point out that it is necessary to cover the artery for five inches to get the correct reading. As a result' of having the transverse metal rods 4 extend the full width of the cuff even pressure is exerted for its -full width when the bag within it is inflated. Also it provides a cuff that fits any arm and whatever the diameter of the patient's arm there is always a bar which can be engaged by one of the hooks 9.

Also these transverse rods are completely enclosed and there is no rough part to injure the most delicate skin.

I also provide shorter end bars 8 on which are formed hooks 9. Fabric tabs or loops 10 are stitched to the respective ends of the cuff to facilitate securing it in place around the limb of the patient.

The holder is provided with a lateral opening 11, as shown in Fig. 3, for insertion of the rubber inflation bag 14. The members 13 are the conventional tubes communicating with the conventional inflation bag 14. Transverse lines of stitching 12 are provided near the respective ends of the cuff to define or limit the portion of the cuff which contains the conventional inflation bag 14.

I provide a line of stitching 15 extending along one side of and parallel with the rod 4; a line of stitching 16 on the other side of and parallel with said rod 4 and a line of stitching IT extending along the outside of and parallel with the end portions 7 of rod 4. I also provide a line of stitching extending longitudinally of the cuff and continuing the line of stitching 17 to the line of stitching 15 adjacent the next rod 7.

In use, the inflation bag 14 is inserted through opening II between the fabric face and fabric back of the cuff, and the cuff is then secured around the arm (or leg) of the patient and the hooks 9 are engaged on one of the exposed portions 5 of one of the transverse metal rods to hold the cuff tightly in place around the limb of the patient. The metal rods reinforce the device, holding the rubber bag in a flat position at all times.

What I claim is: 1. A blood pressure cuff, comprising a series of overlying sections of fabric folded and stitched together to form a blood pressure cuff, transversely disposed spaced rods mounted between the strips of fabric to reinforce same and extending the full width of the cuff and having their end portions reversely bent to prevent injury to the fabric, and means at each end of the cuff engageable with the central portions of the metal rods for adjustably fastening the cuff about the limb of the patient, the aforesaid fastening means comprising hooks mounted in the ends of the fabric to releasably engage with any of the aforesaid metal rods.

2. In a blood pressure cuff, the combination of overlying sections of fabric folded to form the face and back of the cuff of like size, an opening therebetween for insertion of the rubber inflation bag, transversely disposed spaced rods mounted between the sections of the cuff and extending the full width of the cuff and having their end portions reversely bent to prevent injury to the fabric, the central portion only of each of said rods being exposed, hook members mounted at each end of the cuff engageable on the exposed portion of the aforesaid metal rods to adjustably secure the cuff around the arm (or leg) of the patient.

3. In a blood pressure cuff, the combination of like sections of fabric folded to form the face and back of the cuff and having an opening therebetween for i.sertion of the rubber inflation bag, transversely disposed spaced metal rods mounted between the said fabric sections and extending the full width of the cuff to exert even pressure throughout the width of the cuff and having their end portions reversely bent to prevent injury to the fabric, the central portion only of each of said rods being exposed, hook members mounted at each end of the cuff and engageable on the exposed portion of the aforesaid metal rods to adjustably secure the cuff around the limb of the patient, and fabric tabs stitched to both ends of the cuff to facilitate fastening it around the limb of the patient.

4. In a blood pressure cuff, the combination of an integral folded fabric strip having one section forming the back of the cuff and having another section forming the face of the cuff, spaced folded fabric sections stitched to the section forming the back of the cuff, said sections having spaced opposite pockets formed by stitching, transversely disPosed spaced rods mounted between the said fabric sections and extending the full width of the cuff, and having their end portions reversely bent to prevent injury to the fabric, the central portion only of each of said rods being exposed, hook members mounted at each end of the cuff anrd engageable on the exposed portion of the aforesaid metal rods to adjustably secure the cuff around the limb of the patient, and fabric tabs stitched to both ends of the cuff to facilitate fastening it around the limb of the patient.

D. L. NEWTON.