Title:
Merchandise holder
United States Patent 2331038


Abstract:
My invention relatestopa merchandising dvice, and more particularly to' holder for individual items of merchandise such as bottl~ es cans, or the like. Amonig the objects of my inviti'oi are- (1) To provide a novel: anidc impoved merchandise holder which lends itself to rapid loading or...



Inventors:
Meller, Reginald B.
Application Number:
US39105241A
Publication Date:
10/05/1943
Filing Date:
04/30/1941
Assignee:
Meller, Reginald B.
Primary Class:
Other Classes:
206/153, 206/429
International Classes:
B65D71/42
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Description:

My invention relatestopa merchandising dvice, and more particularly to' holder for individual items of merchandise such as bottl~ es cans, or the like.

Amonig the objects of my inviti'oi are- (1) To provide a novel: anidc impoved merchandise holder which lends itself to rapid loading or packing; (2) To provide a novel: and' :impoved merchandise holder which offe'"s', 'i 'him d-isplay 1, possibilities to the miefchandise; (3) To provide a novel ad', imhnroved: merchandise, holder which' atom6atically locks and holds the individual. itemis of merchandise against accidental displacemenft oi' remo0val; ! (4) To providde am novel: nd" iir oved merchandise hold6r wherein the item hrid thiein contribute toward the' efficieýt futicomniing of the device,; ,(5) To provide a novel ah n mproved mer- 2 chandise holder which is xce:edingly siný 'ek in cohstruction and which ieiid' iteii to highspeed production methods'bath in ithe iA'ter of mani0facture and use; (6) To provide a" nol alnd" improved_ mr- 21 chandise holder which will' eiffeiientily .simii thes packing of such merchain-dis f6r shipmenit.

Additional objects: f x&y; iihvt'io6n- Wii bh e brought out ii the foilowiik descriýtioA of tihe same taken- in coinjunctidn withi tle accompanying. drawing whereinhFigure 1h is a view in perpe ecti6f iie a preferred form of my invention; Figure,2 is a view in cross section, tak6e on the line 2-2 of Figure 1; 3 Figure 3 is a view correspilbndii tb t at of Figure 2, but showing' the stressdq condition' of' the device while loading minerc'hia'dis theein Figure 4 is a view similar to Figur 3a, shtowing the condition of the device witi' the' iierchaadise in! its final position'; Figure 5 is a view illustratiii' a blank f6rom whidh my novel anid imiprve6d merchandise holder may be assembled'In geheral, my inviiietion' is- in the' form of a 4_' trough-shaped device adaptfed t'o fuiictibon as a holder to receive and' hbld' mern hifidi96 s'uhi, as bottles, cans, or the' like' whidh ar&6 fmed!' withi a ridge at the bottom ther6bf, wher6ib thie items may be lockiid; i' positi6ni aadihts acdideitai dig- ;6O placeient or removai: Referring to the drawirngI for' a' nibe detailed description of the device in' its' prefierred foiri it cohiprises' a trough , prefdably' of flexibldle material, and includes a- pair of 'ide Wa1is4 9 re-' (( SilieitVy Ki'ged? to adr ifiXermiedia'te floors sectherein ad s pce intervals adjiace t the doi s section' I f' WitA th t joi&iees' of one wall disppi sd wall. n o Tfc floorI sectibi i, formed' with' in'trora latedgesrally of thnding tabs 5 at text e tios' whe ' ' Sdthe sd . w lls- ar otciead;ly firsu adT'us tei, ding beyverd the sided t a a t ,h flEr s ofti i s le i s' supli pVt al d bra d br in ac gAis ral: f-ihed to its associated side catedl aonthe abs of theriof,-g anid ains fOdr to the un dersuirfai 6 the floor secigii t'he afear being fllded over nfEd turned' tnder ithl edei oe s thof tun lateir al extending ta b's' e ý15 The side walls' 9' arC" lp'referably firsf adjusted, how-ever, to t the finwar at an iacute ange to catregid,' taels ofring a suitable mieans for facilitating the, creagig of the bracinW wals along- the pr6ope'r crease line ini' forniig' thb Unidr u A0rtion utitnc 18. In sechd- ing the' biacing walls' to the fldlor sectibiX, the free edge'p olhy of the turned-iundei portioni 18' of each bracink wall is affixed to the floor se6ti'oi and' alohg a region! ad'jacen't the' longifudinal' daxis- thVereof, thus leaving thfe greater part 19 -of each' turniedunder portion' utnattt61b'd' and mnovable wit"i respect to the floor s6ction. .This leas t6 added advasntrae of consiideiabi. iiri't, in the fuc tionih'g o'f' imi-irii'ieed' device, as'will be pointed otit inii describihg' tVi' olikrati'on thiereof.

The'ii nfithandise' holder of' my inventibn' is designed to hftv itisii 21i' such' as bottles; canis; or the lik6 Whilch are' fIornied iith a periDheral ridge' 2'3' af the bbottoih thIfebof anid' With' reslect: t'6 the th a'tticlar i'eiei foi which4 the device is' d'sigiied, the dis&nice' between oppo6site itbfhes 13' inii th'e' d6'vice' should be slightly'less tfi.ai thl diaimitedr of the item in the pl5aiin of t&et ri'Qg 23. Each item is assembled- by fOricing it; bottom do&inward,- betwef the side'w'al 9,dausinr tliem to s~riad: n'd bec6cie ti4essed 'ii bsuhi a' mairier as. o deoelpp' a reactive restoiing' fore- against the ite;iii iii te' direction of theai:rows in Figiui 3. Thls forice i considerably 6nehancedt T the prese-de' of the- braxciný Woalls' I17 an"d ti'o fact tha the' bracing walls are resilf'nitly hi -e'd" to& the floor sect6onh' I," at' a' distnrice6 f1ro'" the sie' eges t61beof- thus offeritig- consdeal- Iv-9.i aoit ' t s- r ifo'g of the side' wal, 9. It is- to bi6 nioted: that during such' spreading, the bracing walls 17 tend to swing, each about its respective hinge axis, which lies along the region of attachment to the floor section 1 I, and such movement causes the unattached part 19 of the turned-under portion of each bracing wall to flex away from the floor section.

As the item is pushed home to its final position in contact with the floor section 11 of the device, the ridge 23 snaps into a pair of oppositely disposed notches 13, permitting the side walls 9 to initiate a return movement in the direction of their normal position, thereby locking the item in place. Complete restoration of the side walls to their normal position is precluded by the presence of the item itself which, as a result, is placed under pressure-engagement by the side walls, leaving the turned-under portions 18 of the bracing walls still partially flexed away from the floor section, as indicated in Figure 4. Such partial flexing of the turned-under 2u portion of each bracing wall is of considerable importance in the efficient operation of my device, since it enables the items themselves to create or set up forces in the device, which will aid those restoring forces already existing in the stressed portions, and thereby increase the holding or locking effect of the device and provide a much firmer grip on the items. This may be explained by pointing out that as the loaded device is set upon a flat surface such as a counter or shelf, the weight of the items held therein will be distributed equally to the bracing walls and thereby produce a reactive force upwardly against each bracing wall. By reason of the construction of each bracing wall and its hinged connection to the fioor section, such reactive forces as will be induced by the weight of the items, will be in directions to supplement the restoring forces already existing in the device, thereby increasing the pressure-engagement between the side walls and the item and effecting a much firmer grip on the item.

The side walls 9 are preferably low in height to form a shallow trough, whereby substantially the entire merchandise may be exposed for dis- 41 play purposes, and may be removed, item by item as desired, merely by spreading the side walls and lifting the item out.

The bracing walls, at the same time, offer substantial space for carrying advertising matter or directions as to the manner of use of the merchandise carried in the holder.

In addition to the advantages already attributed to my device, it also offers many advantages in the packing and shipping of merchan- 5_ dise, as the use of my holders assures proper spacing of the merchandise items and holds them against accidental displacement. Therefore, the need for packing material or partitioning compartments is eliminated, and practically no waste 6 is incurred, as the same holders are used in the displaying and selling of the merchandise after unpacking the same from the container in which they have been shipped.

By reason of the supporting effect of the brac- 6 ing walls and the forces developed in my device, as previously explained, the device can be and preferably is made from cheap flexible material such as paper or the like, having a certain degree of resiliency. A single such device may very eco- 7 nomically be formed from a rectangular blank, and of interest in this connection is the fact that the preparation of such blank need not involve the slightest waste of material, as clearly indicated in Figure 5 which depicts a blank from 7 which one such device may be formed. With reference to this figure, the components of the device are indicated by primed reference numerals corresponding to the unprimed numerals employed in the previous figures. The portion forming the floor section 11' runs through the middle of the blank and is defined by two rows of cuts forming the tabs 15' which in turn are joined by score lines 25. Spaced from each row of tab cuts is a score line 27 to determine the height of each side wall 9', the remainder of the blank adjacent each side wall 9', being dedicated to the formation of a bracing wall 11'.

A score line 29 through each of these remaining portions of the blank will facilitate bending or creasing the bracing wall I7' around the free ends of the tabs 15' during assembling.

The notches 13 of the assembled device come into existence upon assembling the blank, and as will be apparent from the drawing, these notches are determined by the same cuts which define the tabs. Although the cuts may be made to provide rectangular notches, notches which are rhomboidal in shape are preferable, as they afford a better hold on the item to be secured, and will inherently compensate for varying thicknesses in the ridge.

While I have disclosed a blank from which to assemble a single device, the devices may be manufactured in quantity under high speed methods, by providing the. cuts and score lines in blank material as it is removed in ribbon form from a suitable roll, and in a continuous operation, assembling the material as it is so cut and scored, and then cutting off sections to desired length, which length will be determined by the number of items that each device is intended to hold.

The completed holder thus provides a cheap but efficient and attractive means for holding and displaying merchandise of the character described, and one offering many advantages. Although the device has been described as a holder for bottles or cans having a ridge at the bottom thereof, merchandise in bags may similarly be retained in the device by stitching a ridge around the bottom edge of each bag.

While I have described what I consider the preferred form of my invention, it is apparent that the same may be modified, without departing from the spirit thereof, and I accordingly do not desire to be limited in my protection, except as may be necessitated by the prior art and the appended claims.

I claim: 1. A merchandise holder, preferably for items such as bottles, cans or the like having a peripheral ridge at the bottom thereof, comprising, a trough of flexible material including a floor section, a pair of side walls having portions thereof 0 terminating short of said floor section to provide space for the reception of such peripheral ridge upon the insertion of a can or the like in said trough; and a supporting wall for each of said side walls, said supporting wall being joined along 5 one of its edges to its associated side wall adjacent the upper edge thereof and along its opposite edge to said floor section, and disposed at an acute angle with respect to said floor section.

2. A merchandise -holder, preferably for items 0 such as bottles, cans or the like having a peripheral ridge at the bottom thereof, comprising, a trough of flexible material including a floor section having laterally extending tabs, a pair of side walls connecting with said floor section and 5 having portions thereof terminating short of said floor section; and a supporting wall for each of said side walls, said supporting wall being joined along one of its edges to its associated side wall adjacent the upper edge thereof and folded over and under said floor section tabs and affixed to said floor section.

3. A merchandise holder, preferably for items such as bottles, cans or the like having a peripheral ridge at the bottom thereof, comprising, an open top trough of flexible material having side walls and a floor section intermediate said side walls, said side walls being resiliently hinged to said floor section to permit stressed spreading of said walls for the insertion of such item through the open top of said trough, and notched at spaced 1 intervals adjacent said floor section, to receive said ridge and at least partially relieve the stressed condition of said side walls whereby to hold such item against displacement and a supporting member connected to each side wall at 2 the top thereof and at an angle thereto, said member being disposed to overlie a side of said trough and to be folded thereunder and affixed thereto, to normally position said side wall at an acute angle to said floor section. 2 4. A merchandise holder, preferably for items such as bottles, cans or the like having a peripheral ridge at the bottom thereof, comprising, a trough of flexible material having side walls, each notched at spaced intervals adjacent the bottom 3 edge thereof, a floor section joining said side walls along the bottom edges thereof and having spaced tabs extending beyond said side walls; a bracing wall for each of said side walls, said bracing wall being joined to the upper edge of a side wall and 3 folded over and under those floor section tabs extending beyond said side wall; and means affixing the turned-under portion of such bracing wall to the undersurface of said floor section.

5. A merchandise holder, preferably for items such as bottles, cans or the like having a peripheral ridge at the bottom thereof, comprising, a trough of flexible material having side walls, each notched at spaced intervals adjacent the bottom edge thereof, a floor section joining said side walls along the bottom edges thereof and having spaced tabs extending beyond said side walls; a bracing wall for each of said side walls, said bracing wall being joined to the upper edge of a side wall and folded over and under those floor section tabs extending beyond said side wall, and means affixing the turned-under portion of such bracing wall to the undersurface of said floor section along a region of said floor section spaced from the side thereof.

6. A merchandise holder, preferably for items such as bottles, cans or the like having a peripheral ridge at the bottom thereof, comprising, a trough of flexible material having side walls, each notched at spaced intervals at the bottom edge thereof, a floor section joining said side walls 60 along the bottom edges thereof between said notches; a bracing wall exceeding in width that of a side wall for each of said side walls, said bracing wall being joined adjacent the upper edge of a side wall and folded under said floor section in spaced relationship to said side wall to normally dispose said wall at an acute angle to said floor section; and means affixing the turned-under portion of such bracing wall to the undersurface of said floor section.

7. A merchandise holder, preferably for items such as bottles, cans or the like having a peripheral ridge at the bottom thereof, comprising, a trough of flexible material having side walls, each notched at spaced intervals adjacent the bottom edge thereof and toed in toward each other, a floor section joining said side walls along the bottom edges thereof and having spaced tabs 5 extending beyond said side walls; a bracing wall for each of said side walls, said bracing wall being joined to the upper edge of a side wall and folded over and under those floor section tabs extending beyond said side wall; and means af0 fixing the turned-under portion of such bracing wall beneath said floor section along a region spaced from the edge of said floor section.

8. A merchandise holder, preferably for items such as bottles, cans or the like having a periph5 eral ridge at the bottom thereof, comprising, a trough of flexible material including a floor section, a pair of side walls having portions thereof terminating short of said floor section; and a supporting wall for each of said side walls, both 0 said side walls and supporting walls being normally toed inwardly to make interior angles with the floor section of less than 90°.

9. A merchandise holder, preferably for items such as bottles, cans or the like having a periph5 eral ridge at the bottom thereof, comprising a trough of flexible material including a floor section, a pair of side walls connecting with the floor section and having portions thereof terminating short of said floor section, and a bracing wall Sfor each of said side walls, said bracing wall being joined along one of its edges to its associated side wall adjacent its upper edge and folded under and secured to said floor section along a region spaced from the edge of said floor section, leaving a portion of the under-turned section of said bracing wall free to flex away from the floor section.

10. A merchandise holder, preferably for items such as bottles, cans or the like having a peripheral ridge at the bottom thereof, comprising a trough of flexible material including a floor section, a pair of side walls connecting with the floor section and having portions thereof terminating short of said floor section, and a bracing wall for each of said side walls, said bracing wall being joined along one of its edges to its associated side wall adjacent its upper edge and folded under and secured to said floor section along a region spaced from the edge of said floor section, leaving a portion of the under-turned section of said bracing' wall extending beyond the edge of said floor section and free to flex away therefrom.

REGINALD B. MELLER.