Title:
Tray
United States Patent 2328563


Abstract:
This invention relates to a novel advertising medium in the form of an ash tray which may be simply and inexpensively constructed. Heretofore it has been necessary in the formation and construction of ash trays to provide expensive molds and machinery for constructing the finished article....



Inventors:
Malvin, Lichter
Application Number:
US26190139A
Publication Date:
09/07/1943
Filing Date:
03/15/1939
Assignee:
STICKLESS CORP
Primary Class:
Other Classes:
131/231, 229/5.81, 229/122.32, 229/169
International Classes:
G09F23/00
View Patent Images:



Description:

This invention relates to a novel advertising medium in the form of an ash tray which may be simply and inexpensively constructed.

Heretofore it has been necessary in the formation and construction of ash trays to provide expensive molds and machinery for constructing the finished article. Owing to this fact, it has been difficult to so form an ash tray inexpensively so that it might conveniently be used as an advertising medium to be distributed freely.

In the construction of ash trays, no real attention has heretofore been directed to the peculiar formation of materials in a manner adapted to construct the ash tray but rather machines and molds have been used to obtain the necessary formation.

An object therefore of this invention is to so arrange the parts of which the ash tray is formed that a simple, automatic operation upon the blanks of material will be sufficient to form the completed ash tray.

A further object of this invention is to form an ash tray of simple, inexpensive material, preferably paper or other fibrous board, which may be rendered non-inflammable.

Further objects and uses of my invention will be obvious in the following description and drawing in which: Figure 1 is a view in perspective of my ash tray.

Figures 2 and 3 are plan views of the blanks from which the ash tray is formed.

Figure 4 is a view in perspective of the blank of of Figure 3 partially folded up for insertion in the orifice of the blank of Figure 2.

Figure 5 is a cross-sectional view taken on the line 5-5 of Figure 1 and Figure 6 is a diagrammatic cross sectional view of a simple type of mold for operating on the blanks of Figures 2 and 3.

The ash tray of Figure 1 is preferably formed from blanks of the type of Figures 2 and 3. The blank 10 of Figure 3 comprises a bottom portion I , side walls 12, 12 preferably integrally attached to the bottom wall along folded lines 13, 13 and flanges 14 separated by the fold lines 15-15 from the upper edges of the side walls 12.

In the construction of my ash tray, the side walls 12, 12 are folded up as shown in Figure 4 to produce the tray formation as shown therein and the entire tray is thereafter inserted as seen in the cross-sectional view of Figure 5 into the orifice 16 of the blank 17 of Figure 2 wherein the upper edges of the sidewalls 12, that is, the portion adjacent the score lines 15, are engaged against the edges 18 or the orifice 16 of the blank 17 of Figure 2.

When the tray of Figure 4, formed from the blank of Figure 3, is thus inserted through the orifice 16 of the blank 17, the walls 12 of the tray are thus held in place and the ash tray is formed.

It is then necessary merely to so secure the walls in place that they will not accidentally be removed from their predetermined position and thus destroy the ash tray.

Accordingly, the flanges 14 of the blank of Figure 3 are then bound to the panels 19 of the blank 17 adhesively or in any other suitable manner (see Figures 1 and 5). The lateral edges of the flanges 14 may be mitred at 21, Figure 3, in order that they may meet along a common line (Figure 1), thus presenting no unsightly gaps in the structure of the ash tray. Other edges, for instance, the edges 23 of the blank of Figure 3, may be shaped or cut to match with similar edges 24, 24 of the blank of Figure 2, as shown in Figure 1.

Obviously the flanges 14 may be cut or formed in any shape to produce any desired type of design. Likewise the outer edges of the blank of Figure 2 may be cut or formed in any suitable shape for any design desired. Nor need the flanges 14 of the blank of Figure 3 and the panels 30 19 of the blank of Figure 2 be cut so that in the assembled condition they will match exactly, since by various differences in the cutting or shaping of the flanges, various ornamental designs may be produced.

The shape of the orifice 16 of the blank 17 of Figure 2 will, of course, be such as to correspond to the desired or predetermined shape of the tray of Figure 4. Thus, when the tray is so arranged as to produce three sided ash trays or an ash 4 tray having any other desired number of sides, the orifice of Figure 16 will be appropriately constructed.

This type of construction lends itself readily to rapid and immediate cohstruction by hand wherein the blank of Figure 3 is formed into the tray of Figure 4, the tray then being inserted into the orifice of the blank of Figure 2 and the flanges pressed down thereon. The flanges 14 may, of course, be stapled to the blank of Figure 2 or otherwise fastened thereto. When a glue or cement or other adhesive substance is used, then the finished structure or tray may be placed between the members 25 and 26 of the mold 27; the mold 27 thus not necessarily being used in 56 the formation of the ash tray but rather for the purpose of holding the flanges of the blank of Figure 3 against the panels of the blank of Fgure 2 while the cement or other adhesive substance 28 (Figure 5) hardens.

It will also be obvious that this construction, while it lends itself readily to formation of the ash tray by hand, may be adapted to a machine construction wherein the blank of Figure 2 may be mounted on a member similar to the member 26 of Figure 6, the orifice of the blank of Figure 2 corresponding and registering with the depression 29a in the member 26, and the blank of Figure 3 may be pressed down and through the orifice of the blank of Figure 2 by the extrusion 29 of the member 25, the flanges 14 being pressed against the panels 19 and held against them while 'the glue hardens, by the members 30 of the mold 27. Likewise, any suitable fastening or stapling machine may be provided at 30, 30 of the mold 27 to effect the fastening desired.

The bottom II, the walls 12, and the flanges 14 of the blank 10 may be treated with any suitable fire resistant or fire preventing medium in order that the structure be operable as an ash tray. I have found that a surface layer of aluminum foil will present the most attractive appearance while at the same time fire proofing the portion of the structure which may be subjected to heat or flame.

Owing to the fact that the ash tray thus formed is inexpensive it may readily be used as an advertising medium in restaurants with the intention that customers take the ash trays with them. Likewise, they may be readily sent or distributed as souvenirs.

The use of aluminum foil as a fire resisting surface layer also lends itself to the insertion or imprinting thereon of advertising matter in an attractive and convenient manner. Thus all four flanges of the blank of Figure 3 may be imprinted with advertising matter and even the bottom II may be likewise imprinted.

Obviously although I have described this structure as an ash tray it may be used for many other purposes; and variations in the height of the walls 12 may be made in order to adapt this structure to such other purposes. Accordingly, I do not Intend to be limited by the specific disclosures herein, but only by the appended claim.

I elaim: A combined ash tray and coaster for glasses which comprises a shallow cup-shaped main body portion die-cut and die-scored from an integral blank of fire and water resistant treated paper stock having a central portion with radially extending flaps, the said body portion including a flat bottom part of generally regular polygonal form, a series of abutting side wall portions equal in number to the number of sides of the polygonally shaped bottom portion and hingedly connected thereto and flaring upwardly and outwardly with respect thereto and a series of rim portions hingedly connected to said side wall portions, the side edges of which are in abutting relation and which lie in a horizontal plane, and a flat annular supporting and stiffening member having its inner periphery defining a polygon shaped to contact the upper, outer edges of the side wall portions, and having its upper face underlying and adhesively connected to said abutting rim portions adapted to stiffen said main body portion and to maintain the side wall and rim portions in abutting relation.

MALVIN LICHTER.