Title:
Shoemaking
United States Patent 2325639


Abstract:
My invention relates to shoemaking and on:it:ln a plaque adapted to be secured between the upper and the sole of a shoe.and to the outside surface of the upper and designed not nly to present a novel, ornamental istyle effect, ibut also to lend support -to the longitudinal arch of thefoot....



Inventors:
Stritter, Karl A.
Application Number:
US42760542A
Publication Date:
08/03/1943
Filing Date:
01/21/1942
Assignee:
Stritter, Karl A.
Primary Class:
Other Classes:
36/3A, 36/169, D02/939
International Classes:
A43B7/14
View Patent Images:



Description:

My invention relates to shoemaking and on:it:ln a plaque adapted to be secured between the upper and the sole of a shoe.and to the outside surface of the upper and designed not nly to present a novel, ornamental istyle effect, ibut also to lend support -to the longitudinal arch of thefoot. : It is common practice in shoemaking to form an arch supporting wing or cooky integral with an insole or shank piece and it has also beenproP:oed to form such a wing as an Integral part of -an .outsole. However, .the :presence in a sole blank of an integral wing seriously interferes i th the usual stock fitting operations, such as romnding, splitting, channeling, and shank re- 15r ducing.

O:ne object of my invention is to provide -a decorative arch supportng plaque adapted to be secured to an outsole after the usn l stock fitting operations have been carried out on a sole 'blank of conventional shape, in orrer to combine the advantage of an arch support in the afnished shoe with the advantage of easy stock fitting in manufacturing. : A further object of my invention is to provide a shoe equipped with a plaque which is not only valuable for its orthopedic function but which Sdds a dash of flne style to the shoe-a departure from conventional shoemaking practice which has heretofore almost invariably coupled orthopedic functions with ugly appearance.

An important advantage of my invention is that the lower margin of the decorative arch supporting plaque may easily be incorporated in the structure of the shoe adl fastened between the upper and the sole structure by the usual means eiployed to unite the upper and the shoe bottom. That is-to say, the plaque of my invention may be employed in any of the conventional types of shoes, such as the welt, McKay, cement, or turn, without requiring a change in the means used to fasten the upper to the sole or soles.

A feature of my invention is the combination with a decorative arch supporting plaque of an integral portion extending rearwardly along the inside of the sole to fill the hollow at the inside of the heel of the wearer so that the entire inside line of the shoe from the ball line to the back of the heel is accurately conformed to the shape of the average foot. : :: '60 Another advantage of my invention comes from the fact that Imay use various plastic matari!s to form t-e decorative arch supporting plaque, since the plaque is not a part of the in-ole or outsole, and such plastic plaques may 5 harmonize or contrast with the color of the ;material used to form the upper of the shoe and so add ornamental value to the shoe.

These and other objects and features of my invention will more readily be understood and appreciated from the following detailed description of preferred embodiments thereof selected for purposes-f: illustration and shown in the accompanying drawings, in which'ig. 1 is Ia aview in side elevation of a shoe constructed with the plaque of my invention, Fig. 2 is a view In cross section on the line 2-2 of Fig. 1 and Illustrating the employment of the plaque in conjunction with a cement shoe, SFg. 3 is a view in cross section through a shoe of the McKay type in which the plaque has been used, Fig. 4 is a view in cross section through a welt shoe employing the plaque of my invention, - Fig. 5: is a view in cross section through a stitch-down shoe employing the plaque of my invention, Fig. 6 is a view in cross section through a shoe in which an arch supporting wing integral with the insole is coupled with a decorative arch supporting plaque extending along the outside surface of the upper, Fig. 7 is a plan view of an outsole and plaque, Fig. 8 is a view in cross section along the line --8 'of Fig 7, and F :ig. 9 ts a view in cross-section along the line 9-9 of Fig. 7.

SIn Fig. 1:I have shown a shoe comprising an upper 10 of standard cut, an outsole 12 and a heel 14, all assembled in conventional fashion. The decorative arch supporting plaque 16 iS positioned outside the upper at the inside shank of the shoe and extends from a point to the rear of the heel breast line substantially to the ball line of the sole. It will be seen that the plaque 16 is substantially arcuate in shape, although the edge may be scalloped, beaded or subjected to any desired ornamentation. The construction of the shoe will be more evident from an inspection of Fig. 2. It will be seen that the upper 10 with a counter stiffener 22 and a lining 23 is lasted to an insole 18 by staples 20., -The outsole 12 is substantially reduced in thickness along the inside margin of the shank so that the plaque 16 can be cemented to its upper or inner surface without unduly increasing its bulk. In practice the usual stock fitting operations on the outsole 12 are carried out, including the reducing of the shank edge; then the plaque 1f is cemented to the upper surface of the outsole 12, after which the sole and the plaque are placed in a sole molding or conforming machine which imparts to the sole a configuration corresponding to the curves of the last bottom. It will be understood that the plaque and the outsole may be molded separately and then joined.

The molded outsole 12 with its attached plaque IS is then cemented to the insole 18. and to the overlasted margin of the upper 10, this operation being carried out on a standard cement sole attaching machine. Since the plaque IS should preferably be secured to the outer surface of the upper, I prefer to coat the inside face of the plaque with a suitable adhesive before the sole is attached to the shoe. During the sole attaching operation the plaque 16 is pressed tightly against the upper 10 and a firm bond is produced.

However, other methods of securing the plaque tothe upper may be used to advantage. After the last has been removed from the shoe the upper and plaque may be stitched together or secured 'together by. eyelets which: penetrate the plaque, the upper 10, the counter 22. and the lining 23.

The stitching may be carried out to form a fancy border along the edge of the plaque, and if eye- *2A lets are used, they may be of any suitably decorative design.

In Fig. 3 I have shown an alternative form of the invention in which a plaque is employed in conjunction with a shoe of the McKay.type. The shoe includes an outsole 30 which is stock-fitted in the usual manner and channeled as shown at 31. After the stock fitting operations have been accomplished a plaque 32 may be temporarily secured to the upper surface of the outsole 30 by means of a suitable adhesive. An upper 34 combined with a lining 35 and a counter stiffener 36 is then lasted to an insole- 38, tacks 39 being used to secure the over!asted margins in position. A bottom filler 40 is then applied in the usual manner and the outsole 30 with its plaque 32 is then secured.to the upper and the insole 38 by the conventional McKay seam 42 which is concealed in the channel 31 and which unites the outsole 30, the plaque 32, the upper 34, the counter stiffener 36, the lining 35, and the insole 38. -When this operation has been accomplished the plaque 32' is secured to the upper as above described. In this instance I have shown an eyelet 43 which penetrates the plaque 32 and the plies of the upper. The eyelet 43 has the function of providing ventilation to the interior of the shoe in addition to its function of anchoring the upper part of the plaque to the upper.

When the plaque of my invention is utilized in a welt shoe, a slightly different treatment is required. As shown in Fig. 4 an insole 50 is channeled and provided with 'an upstanding sewing rib 52 and a reinforcing ply of gem duck 54. An upper 59 is then lasted to the reinforced sewing rib-52 as by staples 58. The lower margin of a plaque 59 is then temporarily fastened, as by cement for example, to the outer surface of the overlasted margin of the upper 59. A welt 60 is then sewn to the lasted shoe in the usual manner by an inseam 62 which passes through the welt 60, the plaque 59, the upper 56, the sewing rib 52, and the gem duck 54. After the bottom of the lasted shoe has been filled an outsole 64 is attached by-means of a seam 65 uniting the out- 70( sole and the welt 60 in the usual manner. Subsequently the upper exposed portion of the plaque 59 is secured to the upper, and in this case I have illustrated the use of stitching as shown at 66.

When -the plaque of my invention is to be incorporated in the structure of a stitch-down shoe, the upper 70, as shown in Fig. 5, is lasted in the usual manner to an insole 76 by a line of stitching 78. A lining 74 and a counter stiffener 72 are utilized conventionally. An outsole 82 is then temporarily secured to the shoe bottom by cement, and a plaque 80, having an outwardly turned base flange, is positioned with the flange resting on the outlasted flange of the upper. An adhesive may be used to hold it temporarily in place.

Finally the shoe is welted in the usual manner, the welt 84 running over the flange of the plaque 80 and a seam 86 uniting the outsole and welt to the remainder of the shoe. Subsequently the upper portion of the plaque 80 may be secured to the outer surface of the upper 70 by any of the means heretofore described.

,It will be apparent that the plaque may also be incorporated in a turn shoe, in which case the plaque is laid on the last with its base overlapping the sole, following which the shoe is lasted and finished in the usual manner. The :plaque must, however, be carefully tempered so that it will stand the operation of turning the shoe.

In Fig. 6 I have illustrated another embodiment of the invention as applied; by way of example, to a cemented shoe. An insole 90 having an integral arch supporting wing or cookie 92 is temporarily secured to a last. An upper 94, including a counter stiffener and lining is then lasted to the insole, the cookie 92 being located at the inside shank. Subsequently an outsole 96 is cemented to the shoe bottom, a plaque 98 having first been secured to the outsole and molded with it. When the last is removed, the cookie 92 and the plaque 98 are secured together by one or more eyelets 100. The result is an extremely strong and effective arch-supporting truss. The eyelets ventilate the shoe and the plaque provides a pleasing style effect in addition to its function as an arch support.

In .Figs. 7, 8 and 9 I have illustrated a further feature of the invention. An outsole 1 10 is fitted for use in a cement shoe and has its inside shank reduced to receive- a portion of the base of a plaque 112. However, the plaque has an integral rearwardly extending peninsula or :finger 114 which, rests on the upper surface of the outsole at the heel seat, along the inside margin of the outsole. The finger 114 is preferably wedge-shaped in transverse cross section as appears in Fig. 9, the narrower edge of the wedge being directed inwardly. The finger thus thrusts the insole upwardly to fill the hollow at the side of the heel of the foot of a wearer. Furthermore, the base of the plaque extends forwardly across the shank, ending slightly behind the ball line, to form a longitudinal stiffener for the shank of the shoe.

The plaque of my invention may be decorated in any of a number of ways. For example, the plaque may be perforated or cut out to expose the material of the upper through the apertures thus formed. Interesting color effects may thus be obtained. The fact that the plaque is small makes it easy to handle and permits the use of conventional embossing machines. Various designs may be embossed or tooled into leather plaques. For example, the plaque shown in Fig. 1 exhibits an attractive border surrounding an initial so that the purchaser may buy a pair of monogrammed shoes. Decalcomanias may be used to decorate plastic plaques-or a suitable design may be worked out in the seam uniting a plaque to-an upper. Furthermore the plaques may be covered with an ornamental sheath of leather, fabric, or other sheet material, in which case the lower edge of the cover will extend between the upper and the sole and be entirely concealed.

The plaque of my invention may be used with a platform, or midsole, type of shoe, and in such cases the plaque will be held between the upper and the midsole. In the appended claims the term "outsole" refers to the sole which is secured against the lasted margin of the upper.

Having thus described and illustrated my invention, what I claim as new and desired to secure by Letters Patent of the United States is: 1. The process of shoemaking which includes the steps of preparing an outsole for incorporation in a shoe, reducing the shank of the outsole along its upper edge portion, attaching an edge of an arch-supporting plaque to the reduced margin of the outsole shank, then fastening the outsole with its attached plaque to a lasted upper and insole, and subsequently securing the plaque on 3 the outside of the upper above the sole.

2. The process of shoemaking which includes the steps of preparing an outsole for incorporation in a shoe, reducing the shank of the outsole along the upper edge of its inside shank portion, attaching an edge of an arch-supporting plaque to the reduced margin of the outsole shank and extending the rear end of the plaque rearwardly on the upper surface of the heel seat portion of the outsole, then fastening the outsole with its attached plaque to a lasted upper and insole, and subsequently securing the plaque on the outside of the upper above the sole.

KARL A. STRITTER.