Title:
Antisiphonic flush valve and silencer
United States Patent 2283973


Abstract:
My invention relates to flush valves of the ball cock type such as are generally used for flushing toilet bowls and the principal objects of my invention are, to generally improve upon and simplify the construction of the existing forms of flushing valves, further, to provide a valve that will...



Inventors:
Criss, Loren E.
Application Number:
US25608739A
Publication Date:
05/26/1942
Filing Date:
02/13/1939
Assignee:
Criss, Loren E.
Primary Class:
Other Classes:
137/444, 251/46
International Classes:
E03C1/10
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Description:

My invention relates to flush valves of the ball cock type such as are generally used for flushing toilet bowls and the principal objects of my invention are, to generally improve upon and simplify the construction of the existing forms of flushing valves, further, to provide a valve that will prevent water -from the toilet bowls and flushing tanks from being drawn by siphonic action downwardly through the main water line in the event that the latter for any cause ceases to function at a point below one or more flush valves that are connected to the main water supply line and which condition generally exists in buildings having two or more floors with toilet bowls and tanks on the upper floors and further, to provide a flush valve that will be highly effective in silencing the noise generally produced by water rushing through the valve during flushing operations.

A further object of my invention is, to provide an anti-siphonic flush valve that is relatively simple in construction, capable of being easily and quickly installed and which acts instantly to automatically break any siphonic action that may develop in the water supply line to which the valve is connected.

With the foregoing and other objects in view, my invention consists in certain novel features of construction and arrangement of parts that will be hereinafter more fully described and claimed and illustrated in the accompanying drawing in which: Fig. 1 is a top plan view of a flushing tank and showing my improved anti-siphonic flush valve and ball cock positioned therein.

Fig. 2 is an enlarged vertical section taken on the line 2-2 of Fig. 1.

Fig. 3 is a vertical cross section taken on the line 3-3 of Fig. 1.

Fig. 4 is a vertical section taken through the upper portion of the valve and showing the same open for the admission of air to break siphonic action.

Fig. 5 is a horizontal section taken on the line 5-5 of Fig. 3.

Fig. 6 is a horizontal section taken on the line 6-6 of Fig. 3.

Fig. 7 is a horizontal section similar to Fig. 6 and showing a modified construction.

Referring by numerals to the accompanying drawing which illustrates a preferred embodiment of my invention, 10 designates a conventional toilet flush tank and, extending through the bottom thereof is a pipe 11 that is connected to a main so as to serve the tank with water.

Detachably connected to the end of the pipe 11 within the tank 10, is a fitting 12 that includes a vertically disposed tubular member 13 and, projecting from the lower portion thereof is a short horizontally disposed tubular member 14 having an upturned end 15. Detachably secured to the upturned end 15 of the tubular member 14, is the lower part 16 of a valve housing and, formed integral therewith is a concentrically arranged short vertically disposed tube: 17, the upper end of which is flared outwardly to provide a valve seat 18. Overlying the upper end of the housing I6, is the edge of a diaphragm 19, preferably of rubber or analogous elastic material, the central portion of which is adapted to rest on the valve seat 18 and this diaphragm is clamped to the lower housing member 18 by the overlying lower edge of an upper valve housing member 20.

Screws 21 or like fastening devices pass through the edges of the upper housing member 20, diaphragm 19, and the upper edge of the lower housing member 16. Positioned on top of the central portion of diaphragm 19 is a disc 22 of inflexible material, preferably metal, and passing through the center thereof and through the center of the diaphragm is a small tube 23, the ends of which are flanged outwardly so as to lie on top of the disc 22 and against the under side of the central portion of diaphragm 19.

Formed integral with and projecting upwardly from the central portion of the upper part 20 of the valve housing is, a short tubular member 24 closed at its lower end by a partition 25 and, formed integral with and projecting upwardly from the top of this partition is a conical lug 26, through which is formed a small vertically disposed port 27. As illustrated in Figs. 2 and 3, the bore through tube 23 is somewhat smaller than the diameter of port 27 and thus water will flow from the chamber in housing. 20 faster than water may enter said chamber through the smaller bore of tube 23. Arranged for sliding movement in tubular member 24 is a plunger 28 carrying at its lower end a disc. 29 of rubber or the like, which is adapted to bear on top of lug 26 and close the port 27 therethrough and, arranged in the central portion of this plunger 28 is a packing ring 30 that prevents water from passing upwardly through the tubular member 24.

Pivotally connected to the upper end of plunger 28 is one end of a lever 31 that-is fulcrumed on a bracket 32 that is carried by the upper portion of tubular member 24 and, secured to the outer end of this lever 31 is an arm 33 that carries a conventional flush tank float 34.

Under normal conditions, or with a supply of flushing water in tank 10, float 34 is maintained at its upper limit of movement so that plunger 28 is maintained at its lower limit of movement, with disc 29 resting on lug 26 to close port 27.

Formed through the wall of the upper part 20' of the valve housing is a duct 35, the upper end of which communicates with the lower portion of the chamber in tubular member 24 and the lower end of said duct communicates with a port 36 that is formed through diaphragm 19 adjacent its edge. The lower end of port 36 communicates with a pocket or recess 37 that is formed in the upper portion of the lower part 16 of the valve housing and, the lower portion of this pocket communicates with the chamber in the lower part of the valve housing by means of a port 38. Secured to valve housing member 16 and communicating with the pocket 37, is a small tube 39 that leads into the conventional toilet bowl refill tube 40 and the'latter leading downwardly to the bowl. Connected to the lower portion of the lower part 16 of the valve housing and communicating with the chamber therein is a pipe 41 that provides a discharge for the water from the chamber in the lower part 16 of the valve housing into the tank.

Removably mounted on the upper end of: the tube 13 is the lower end of a bowl 42, provided in its top with a circular opening 43 and, formed on the under side of the edge of the bowl around 35: this opening is a rib 44 that functions as a valve seat.

Concentrically arranged within tube 13 is a smaller tube 45, the lower end of which is seated in the fitting 12 at the lower end of said tube 13 40; and, the open lower end of this tube 45 communicates with the upper end of the pipeI 1.

Arranged for sliding movement within tube is a tube 46, the closed upper end 47 of which is round and its diameter is equal to the internal 4: diameter of the larger tube 45. That portion of tube 46 below the closed upper end 47 is hexagonal in cross -section with the corners between the angular faces having sliding engagement with the inner face of tube 45. This construction provides a plurality of longitudinally disposed arcuate ducts 48 between the tubes 45 and 46 and which ducts provide passages for water that flows through tube 45.

Tubes 45 and 46 are formed of non-corrodible material, for instance, stainless steel.

Formed through the upper portion 47 of tube 46, just below closed end 47, are apertures 49 that establish communication between the passageway through the tube 46 and the chamber within bowl 42. Seated in the closed upper end 47 of tube 46 is the threaded lower end of a screw 50. Positioned on screw 50 and resting on the top of tube 46, is a disc valve 51 of rubber or other flexible material which, when tube 46 is moved downward to its limit of movement,. rests on the annular valve seat formed by the upper end of tube 45, thus cutting off the passage of water or air through said tube.

Mounted on screw 50 and resting on top of valve 51 is a washer 52 and, resting on top of said washer and carried by the screw 50 is a disc valve 53 of rubber or like flexible material which, when the tube 486 moves to its upper limit of travel, engages valve seat 44 and cuts off the passage of water and air therethrough. Valves 51 and 53 with the interposed disc 52 are secured in position on screw 50 by means of a washer 54 and the latter being engaged by the head 55 of screw 50.

Suitably supported in spaced relation above bowl 42 so as to cover but not entirely close opening 43, is a disc 56 having a depending edge which provides a shield for the opening 43 in the top of bowl 42 and prevents extraneous objects from entering the opening 43 to interfere with the proper functioning of the valves 51 and 53.

Under normal conditions, or with the float 34 resting on top of the body of water within tank 10 and holding the valve 29 in the lower end of plunger 28 on the seat at the upper end of lug 26, port 27 is closed. Water under the pressure carried in the supply main fills supply pipe 11, the arcuate ducts 48 between the tubes 45 and 46, and water fills the bowl 42, the space between tube 45 and tubular member 13 of fitting 12, the chamber in the extension 14 of the fitting, the small tubular member 23,. and the chamber in the. upper valve housing member 20 above diaphragm 19. The pressure of the water in the chamber in the upper housing member 20 acting on top of the diaphragm 19 forces the same onto the seat 18, thus preventing the water from entering the chamber within the lower valve housing member 16 between the wall thereof and the concentric tubular member 17, thus cutting off flow of water downward through pipe 41. to the tank 10.

The pressure of the water in bowl 42 holds valve 53 against its seat 44, thereby preventing the escape of water through opening 43 and likewise preventing air from entering said opening.

When a bowl flushing operation takes place, the body of water within tank 10 will discharge downwardly into and through the bowl in the conventional manner and float 34 moves downward, thereby elevating plunger 28 to lift valve 29 off its seat and immediately the pressure of the water in the chamber within upper housing member 20 is relieved and, a small amount of water will pass upwardly through port 27, thence Sdownwardly through duct 35, thence through aperture 36 in the diaphragm into pocket 37 and from thence through tube 39 to refill tube 40. At the same time water will discharge through port 38 into the chamber within the lower valve housing member 16.

As the pressure in the chamber above the diaphragm 19 is relieved as just described, the pressure of water in fitting 12 will lift the central portion of the diaphragm off the seat 18, thus permitting water to flow from fitting 12 upwardly through tubular member 17, thence into the chamber within the lower valve housing member 16 and from thence downwardly through tube 41 to refill the tank. As the tank is refilled, float 34 gradually rises on the upwardly moving surface of the water and finally the plunger 28 is moved downward until valve 29 rests on its seat and closes port 27 and, following this closing action, pressure of the water admitted to the chamber above the diaphragm 19 through tubular member 23 builds up to such a degree as to force the diaphragm downwardly onto its seat 18, thereby cutting off further flow of water from the fitting 12 into the chamber within lower valve housing member 16 and from thence to the tank refill tube 41 and bowl refill tubes 39 and 40. - During the flushing operation just described, valve 53 is maintained against its seat 44 by the pressure of the water in the fitting 12 and bowl 42: In the event that a break occurs in the water supply line at a point below the valve and which break- tends to set up siphonic action to draw water from the bowl and tank and permit the same to flow downwardly through the supply line, the downward movement of water from the fitting 12 will produce a drop in pressure within bowl 42 and, immediately following such action the suction resulting from the rush of air into the bowl through opening 43, will cause tube 46 and parts carried thereby to instantly move downward until valve 51 rests on its seat at the upper end of tube 45, thereby positively cutting off the downward flow of water through said tube and consequently preventing water from being drawn from the tank through the pipe 41 to the water supply line.

As tube 46 moves downward as just described, the apertures 49 which are in the round upper portion 47 of said tube move into position within the upper portion of tube 45 and, as a result of such position and the position of valve 51 on the upper end of tube 45, effectually cuts off any suction into the upper end of tube 45 and, consequently counteracts siphonic action that would otherwise tend to draw contaminated water into the line that supplies the tanks with flushing water.

When the break in the supply line has been repaired, the pressure of the water flowing upwardly through tube 46 and into bowl 42 instantly moves said tube upwardly so as to reposition valve 53 on its seat 44, thus restoring the antisiphonic valvular structure to its normal condition.

In Fig. 7 I have shown positioned between the tubular portion 13 of fitting 12 and tube 45, a tube 57 formed of thin sheet metal, the wall of which is crimped or corrugated longitudinally, thus forming a plurality of relatively small parallel ducts between the walls of the tubes 13 and and, this construction divides the flow of the entire volume of water through the tubular member 13 and in doing so, it functions as an effective silencer to counteract the noise that would otherwise be produced by the flow of water lengthwise between the two tubes. Where low pressure water supply conditions are encountered, I find it advisable to plug the openings 49 in the upper portion of tube 46 and, thus the water passing from pipe 11 into the fitting 12 flows upwardly through the longitudinally disposed ducts 48 between the tubes 45 and 46 and discharges from the open upper end of tube 45 into the bowl 42.

One of the particularly advantageous features of my invention is, the construction whereby the siphon breaking structure, which includes the tube 45, bowl 42, valves 51 and 53, and tube 46 that slides lengthwise within tube 45, is mounted directly on the water supply line for the flush tank and as a result, the anti-siphonic valve structure acts instantly in the event of a break in the main water supply line to effectively prevent siphonic action to draw contaminated water from the bowl and tank into the main supply line.

The operation of the anti-siphonic structure is entirely independent of the operation of the ball cock that controls the water supply to the tank.

Thus it will be seen that I have provided an anti-siphonic flush valve and silencer that is relatively simple in construction, inexpensive of manufacture and very effective in performing the functions for which it is intended.

It will be! understood that minor changes in the size, form and construction of the various parts of my improved anti-siphonic flush valve and silencer, may be made and substituted for those herein shown and described, without departing from the spirit of my invention, the scope of which is set forth in the appended claims.

I claim as my invention: 1. In an anti-siphonic flush valve and silencer, a vertically disposed tubular member, a water supply inlet in the lower portion thereof, a housing member on the upper portion of said tubular member, which housing member is provided in its upper portion with an air inlet opening, an open ended tube concentrically arranged with respect to and extending lengthwise through said tubular member for receiving water from the supply inlet to which said concentrically arranged tube is connected, a tube extending through and arranged for sliding movement in said concentrically arranged tube, valvular means carried by the upper portion of said sliding tube for alternately closing the air inlet opening in said housing and the open upper end of the concentrically arranged tube, there being a water outlet opening formed in the upper portion of said sliding tube and the space between said concentrically arranged tube and sliding tube being divided throughout the lengths of said latter tubes to form a plurality of longitudinally disposed water flow ducts.

2. In an anti-siphonic flush valve and silencer, a vertically disposed tube, a water supply inlet in the lower portion of said tube, said tube being provided in its lower portion with an outlet, there being an air inlet opening in the the upper portion of said tube, an open ended tube extending through said first mentioned tube and having its lower end connected to the water supply inlet, a third tube extending lengthwise through said second mentioned tube, a valve carried by the upper end of said third mentioned tube and adapted when said tube is elevated to close the air inlet opening into the upper end of the first 4. mentioned tube, there being an opening in the upper portion of said third mentioned tube below said valve and means whereby the flow of liquid upwardly between said second and third mentioned tubes is restricted.

5n 3. In an anti-siphonic flush valve and silencer, a vertically disposed tube, a water supply inlet in the lower portion of said tube, said tube being provided in its lower portion with an outlet, there being an air inlet opening in the upper portion of said tube, an open ended tube extending through said first mentioned tube and having its lower end connected to the water supply inlet, a third tube extending lengthwise through said second mentioned tube, valvular means carried by the upper portion of said third mentioned tube for alternately closing the air inlet opening in the upper portion of said housing and the upper end of said second mentioned tube, there being an opening in the upper portion of said third mentioned tube below said valvular means and means whereby the flow of liquid upwardly between said second and third mentioned tubes is restricted.

4. In an anti-siphonic flush valve and silencer, a substantially U-shaped housing, a water supply inlet in the lower end of one leg of said housing, the other leg of said housing being adapted to receive the operating parts of a flush valve, an open ended tube extending through the leg of said housing that is connected to the water supply inlet, there being an air inlet opening formed in the upper portion of the leg of the housing that is connected to the water supply inlet, a tube extending lengthwise through and arranged for sliding movement within said open ended tube, valvular means carried by the upper end of said sliding tube and adapted to alternately close the air inlet opening in the upper portion of the leg of the housing through which said tubes extend and means whereby the flow of liquid between the two tubes is restricted.

5. An anti-siphonic flush valve and silencer as set forth in claim 4 and there being an opening formed through the upper portion of the sliding tube below the valvular means carried thereby.

LOREN E. CRISS.