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Title:
Game
United States Patent 2282128
Abstract:
This invention relates to games and more particularly to games which are played on a charted board with movable playing pieces or units having varying values and effects, which may be increased, decreased, or nullified, respectively at different stages during the playing of the game. An object...


Inventors:
Gubbins, James B.
Publication Date:
05/05/1942
Assignee:
Gubbins, James B.
Primary Class:
Other Classes:
273/284, D21/335
International Classes:
A63F3/00; A63F3/02
View Patent Images:
Description:

This invention relates to games and more particularly to games which are played on a charted board with movable playing pieces or units having varying values and effects, which may be increased, decreased, or nullified, respectively at different stages during the playing of the game.

An object of the invention is to provide a game which is both educational and pleasant, and stimulating to thought about any subject that may be of general interest to a large mass of the 1 people at any one time; another object-is to-provide a game to visualize shifting conditions in national or international problems, such as in war, finance, agriculture and current -subjects, the trends of which have increasing and decreas- 1 ing values during a cycle of time. Being a game, it is not intended that actual, theoretical, or scientifically correct conditions may be reproduced or exemplified. The game is intended only to stimulate interest, and be a reflex of the con- 2 ditions which each player imagines to exist -in order to win the game. At the present time such a subject of general interest is the European war, and for that reason, the game is here described as applied to army maneuvers and the playing pieces are designated as soldiers, armaments, airplanes, engineering units, etc.

In adapting the game to other fields, the shape and values .of the playing pieces may be appropriately changed to represent units in such other fields. For example, in adapting the game as a navy game, the playing pieces would represent fighting ships of different catagories: submarines, colliers; planes, marines, etc.; in adaptation to crop movements, playing pieces may be trainloads of. grain of varying numbers of cars, with cars detachable and shiftable to different trains, or to grain elevator depots. In any exemplifications of the game, the relative values of the playing pieces may be increased, decreased, or transferred from one unit to another during the play of the game. The rules apply to the movement of playing pieces and the varying values thereof may be changed to cover the particular subject to which the game is being then adapted.

As a part of the game, a graphic playing board is employed and this may be likewise altered and made appropriate to the subject of the game. In most instances a territorial map may be employed as the playing board and this may be varied according to the selected territory and selected subject of operations on which the game is based.

Having the foregoing and other objects in view, the invention consists in the apparatus herein described and illustrated in the accompanying drawings, it being understood that various changes in the form, proportion, size and details of construction of the apparatus and devices may be resorted to within the scope of the appended claims without departing from the spirit or sacrificing any of the advantages of the invention.

To more clearly comprehend the invention, reference is directed to the accompanying drawSings, wherein: Fig. 1 is a plan view of-a playingboard with.a central transverse sight-barrier.

Fig. 2 is a longitudinal vertical section on line II-II of Fig. 1, with sight barrier broken to re0 duce its height.

Fig. 3 is an enlarged view of a portion of Fig. 2.

Fig. 4, 5, 6 and 7 are perspectives of playing pieces formed and shaped to represent military armament of varying catagories, Fig. 4 including a fragmentary portion of playing board.

Fig. 8 is a perspective of another type of playing piece shaped to represent a supply truck.

Fig. 9 is a perspective of another type of playing piece formed to represent a unit of infantry.

o0 Fig. 10 is a, perspective of another type of playing piece formed to generally represent a bridge.

Pig. 11 is another type of playing piece formed to represent an airplane.

Referring to the drawings, in which like char>5 acters of reference indicate corresponding parts in the several views, 10 represents generally a playing board which preferably comprises a relatively flat rectangular box II having its vertical wall divided transversely at a substantially ceni0 tral plane so as to provide a bottom and a lid which are hingedly connected at one edge as at 12 so that the box may be opened on such hinges and form two abutting compartments 13, 14, each of which may be one-half of the playing 35 board. A vertically upstanding screen or sightbarrier 15 extends transversely centrally of the entire playing board and is of sufficient height so that in ordinarily playing the game, one seated player cannot view the playing board of his op40 ponent. The barrier 15 may be conveniently atStached to one of the abutting walls of the compartments 13, 14 such as by a hinge 18 having one butt secured to the inner face of the abutting wall, and the other butt secured to the lower 45 portion of the barrier, thus providing a barrier which, while secured to the compartment wall may, nevertheless, be folded downwardly into one of the compartments when the game is not being played and its -box-like casing is closed. The 5barrier may be supported at its erect vertical position by hinge link 11 which has pivot mountings 18 at its opposite ends to the side wall of the playing board and to the barrier, respectively.

The inner face of the bottom of the compart5 ments 13, 14 may comprise the playing board, Swhich consists of two playing areas 20, 21, each of said areas being divided into a plurality of playing sections or spaces which are serially numbered, preferably from 1 to 100, this numbering being preferred since it 'facilitates easy decimal io0 alculation of spaces, It is further .desirable :that the numbers of the sections be at the lower corner of the sections to facilitate view thereof by the player, the numbers being normal to the players on opposite ends of the board.

From rules for playing the game, hereafter set forth, a player is to advise his opponent what particular numbered playing sections, squares or spaces, he is intending to hit with artillery or to which an airplane is directed for discovery or observation. It will therefore be more con- 1 venient to have the serial numbers of the sections or spaces run in reverse order on opposite playing areas of the board, as this provides oppositely corresponding serial numbers and facilitates computations in firing guns and advising 1I opponents the serial numbers of spaces fired upon.

It is preferred, however, that instead of imprinting the numbered playing sections directly upon the inner face of the bottom of the com- 21 partments 13, 14, such playing areas and numbered sections or spaces be printed on transparent flexible sheets 22, one of such sheets overlying each half or playing area 20, 21 of the playing board. The transparent sheets 22 are of such 2z size that they fit snugly but with ready removability within the compartments 13, 14 and they may have hinged connection at one edge to the abutting hinged walls of the compartments 13, 14 as best shown in Fig. 3, the hinges 23 having one wing secured to the compartment wall and having the other wing fastened to an edge portion of sheet 22 by an eyelet 24. The sheet 22 is provided at its opposite edge with an upstanding finger grip member 25 so that the transparent sheet may be readily lifted on its hinges by the player at that edge of the board.

The game may be played by merely employing the board imprinted with the serially numbered square playing sections, whether they be imprinted upon the playing surface of the compartments 13, 14, or upon the face of the transparent sheets 22. It is, however, desired to provoke an interest of the player in the environment which the game is to represent. The purpose of having the transparent sheet hingedly mounted is in order that a graphic diagram 26 may be inserted beneath the sheet 22 and be visible therethrough.

The graphic diagram 26 may pictorially represent any suitable environment for the game and since it is loosely inserted it may be changed from time to time as it is desired to change the environment of the game. For instance, in the present example the graphic diagrams consist of sections of a map of a hypothetical or an actual war zone. Such maps may be portions of actual accurate geographic maps, in which event it is likely that the topographic and geographic character of the map may have no relationship to the geometrical rectangles of the playing sections of the board, but may, nevertheless, serve to keep up an interest in the game since a player may find it interesting to work his playing pieces toward certain strategically important objectives on the map. Such a map is illustrated at the left-hand of Pig. 1, compartment 13, as underlying sheet 22 at that end of the board.

On the other hand, it may be desired to prepare special graphic diagrams, such as maps which are more or less similar to accurate maps, but have their geographic and arterial factors altered sufficiently so that rivers, railroads, and highways, etc., follow in general the tiers of the sections on the playing board and thus adapt the playing board to a change in the rules whereby playing pieces may be moved at double speed on the line of a railroad or may be impeded by the barrier of a river, except at points indicated as bridges. Such a specially designed map is shown as underlying the sheet 22 at the right hand half of Fig. 1, compartment 14.

The game is provided with a plurality of playing pieces and in the present exemplification 0 these playing pieces assume a general similitude to military apparatus such as guns of varying calibers, a supply truck or tank, infantrymen, bridges, and airplanes. There may be one or more of each of these pieces. These playing 5 pieces may be conveniently subdivided into five classes: the operating units of artillery of Figs. 4 to 7, inclusive, the supply units of Fig. 8, the man-power or infantry units of Fig. 9, the discovery units or airplanes of Fig. 11, and the en0 gineering units represented by the bridge of Fig. 10.

The operating or artillery units of Figs. 4 to 7, inclusive, are divided into different categories representing varying calibers of guns which is 5 indicated by varying the physical size of the playing pieces and its equipment. For example, in the present exemplification, Fig. 4 is designated as a 75 mm. or large caliber gun; Fig. 5 is a 16 mm. or medium caliber gun; Fig. 6 is a 9 Smm. light artillery, next in order of relatively reduced caliber; Fig. 7 is an anti-aircraft gun which is the smallest of the calibers here employed. Each of the operating pieces comprises a gun mount base 30 and a gun 31 mounted thereon, indicating by its physical size the caliber type of that gun. One lower corner at the base of any unit may be cut away as at 32 to make the serial number of the playing section visible at all times to the player, as shown in Fig. 4.

Each gun mount 30 is provided with means to removably and replaceably hold a supply of ammunition for the particular gun, in the present instance being a cavity or recess 33 into which a shell or auxiliary unit 34 may be removably inserted. The recesses 33 and the shells indicated by pegs 34 are of varying sizes in the respective gunmount pieces 30, thereby physically and visibly indicating the gun to which the shell or peg may be applied as ammunition. If desired, the caliber range and destructive area of each gun, as set forth in the playing rules, may be printed on small slips and pasted on the reverse or rear face of the playing piece, but it is not believed necessary to illustrate this in the drawings.

The supply units of Fig. 8 are provided with a body 35 preferably shaped to resemble, as near as conveniently may be, a supply truck. The truck or supply unit likewise has cavities or recesses 33 of various sizes therein for removably receiving an additional supply of shells 34 of the respective sizes similar to the shells which are supplied to the respective calibers of operating units. The truck is, therefore, a general unit for supplying auxiliary units or shells to all of the types of guns. The manpower or infantry unit of Fig. 9 is here exemplified as a single block playing piece 36 shaped to generally indicate an infantry unit, such as a file, squad or company.

The engineering unit of Fig. 10 is a solid unit indicating a bridge 3T. The discovery unit of Fig. 11 is shaped to simulate an airplane 38, which has for its cockpit or cabin a resilient clip 39 under which slips of paper may be releasably inserted for exchange of information or discovery of facts relative to an opponent's strategic or vulnerable spaces, equipment or troops.

It is to be understood that additional details could be added to the game without change of the inventive idea, but it is believed that the ideas of the invention have been sufficiently exemplified by the number of different playing pieces herein mentioned. It could be further itemized by providing varying types of offensive tanks, breaking-down the infantry units 36 into removable files of nen, having the files of men replaced by reinforcements brought up by the supply truck in the same manner as replacement of shells for the various categories of artillery guns; or the infantry units may be provided with hand grenades which are exhausted by a player's miove, and replenished by the supply truck in the same manner as shells for artillery.

It is believed that such additions would in no way change the idea of means herein exemplified, and would only serve to complicate the decription of this one form which the invention may take.

The playing of the game, as in all games, must depend on a set of rules which are coordinated with the physical elements, and in order that the advantages of the invention may be understood and applied for the purpose for which it is intended, an example of rules contemplated for use in playing the game is as follows: 80 The game consists of a playing board, 56 playing pieces, a sight-barrier or screen and maps or charts.

The board is divided at the center by the sight-barrier into two playing areas, each of 85 which is ruled off in squares or sections that are numbered from 1 to 100.

A sight-barrier screen is placed in the center of the board between the two playing areas to obstruct the vision of the players into the territory or playing area of his opponent.

Maps (or charts) of the hypothetical environmient of the game are provided and these maps may underlie the transparent ruled sheet of the playing board. 48 The 56 playing pieces are divided into two army units, each unit being classified as follows: Bridges ------------- --------------- 1 0 Trucks-------------------------------- 1 Airplanes ------- ------ -------------- 4 Squads of infantry----------------- 10 75 millimeter guns (large artillery)--_ - 2 16 millimeter guns (medium artillery)----- 3 S 9 millimeter guns (light artillery) ---_ - 4 Anti-aircraft guns----------------------- 3 Maps or charts------------------------ 1 At the start of the game the screen is placed 6 in the center of the board between the two playing areas. The bridge is placed on any number in the first row. (Nos. 1 to 10.) The infantry squads and guns start on the third row of plaving sections (Nos. 21 to 30). There must be three squads of infantry leading the army unit-although guns may parallel. None must exceed these first three infantry squads at the start of the game. The remaining infantry squads and guns are placed anywhere on the board but none . forwardly of the third row of playing sections (Nos. 21 to 30). After the first move the board is clear for movements on any space.

The spaces in the back row of the board (Nos. 91 to 100) are considered as the arm base. 71 Shells are kept off the board and they may be placed on the truck at the base only.

Airplanes are not put on the board. They are kept to the side and used for discovery or observation only.

Who starts the game is decided by the players. One moves after the other in rotation. A move consists of either moving an infantry squad or a gun; shooting a gun or sending over an airplane. Movements of playing pieces and the range and effect of firing of differing guns, as well as truck and plane moves are explained under their respective headings.

At the start of the game all gun mounts are loaded to capacity with shells, as is also the truck. When a gun is fired it constitutes a move and the shell must be removed and placed off the board to be reloaded on the truck whenever the truck reaches the base with its appropriate carrier recesses empty to receive that size shell.

A move by a player may constitute either moving a piece of equipment for its allowable spaces, or the firing of a gun; both cannot be done on the same move. When a move is made the player tells his opponent he has moved. If a player believes it unwise to move he may remain as is; in such event, he tells his opponent he has made his allotted move, but it is not necessary to actually move. When a gun is fired the player must mention the caliber of the gun; also the spaces fired upon must be specifically mentioned. The serial number of the section or space on which the gun is positioned must also be mentioned, in order that the opposing player may verify whatever that particular character of gun has capacity to hit in the spaces specified.

When a gun hits spaces containing any of opponents pieces they must be immediately removed from the board, and with the exception of the truck, they may not be replaced. When any gun is fired a shell must be removed from the gun mount, and may be replaced only by the supply truck. Even though a gun may have Sexhausted its shells, it may remain on the board, and its placement moved in its urn, so long as it is not destroyed by an opponent, since its ammunition supply may later be replenished by the supply truck. If a gun is effective, under the ) rules, to hit more than one section, the player must mention the particular sections to be hit by the shell, and if the opponent has equipment in the mentioned sections, such equipment is theoretically destroyed, but if the gun might Shave been capable within its specified capacity to hit certain sections, but those sections are not those mentioned by the player, any equipment on the unmentioned section is not destroyed. To illustrate, a 75 mm. gun hits two longitudinal Ssections in direct line and two adjoining lateral sections on one side or the other thereof. Taking section "64." a 75-mm. shell may hit "74" and "64" or "54" and "64" in direct line. If "64" and "74" are mentioned, the player must also mentioned the lateral spaces to be affected. since such lateral snaces may be either "63" and "73" or "65" and "75." The truck supplies the shells to the guns. At the start of the eame it i. fully loaded and ulacer 0 anywhere desired, behind the first two rows. It contains one shell for the 75 mm. (heavy) gun; two for the 16 mm. (medium) gun; three for the 9 mm. (light artillery); and three for the antiaircraft. The truck moves not to exceed two 5 spaces with every move. It is the only piece of equipment allowed to move longitudinal and lateral. When it comes to a space touching a gun, whether straight or diagonally, and if that gun has an empty shell rack, the truck may reload it; shells can only be taken from the specific racks applicable to the adjacent gun. It returns to the base for reloading when necessary, two spaces with each move, as stated before.

When the truck is hit by an opponent's shell, it must be taken off and returned to any playing section at the base, but it may be reloaded to its full capacity at the base, the theory being that it and its ammunition was destroyed by the shell hit, and that a new fully loaded truck has been substituted at the base. Putting such new truck on the board constitutes a move, but when an undestroyed truck returns to the base to replenish its supply of ammunition, the mere replenishing of the ammunition is not a move. 75 Millimeter (large gun).-There are two for each playing area, and each carries one shell.

The 75 mm. either fires its shell, or it may move 'ts placement one space forward or one space backward or two spaces sideways. It has a maximum range of fifteen spaces and a minimum range of seven spaces. It hits four of the opponent's specifically mentioned spaces, two in direct longitudinal line and two on either lateral side thereof.

16 Millimeter (medium gun).-There are three for each playing area, and each carries two shells.

The 16 mm. either fires one of its shells, or it may move its placement, not to exceed two spaces forward or two spaces backward or three spaces sideways. Its firing capacity is in a straight line 3 only, a maximum range of ten spaces, and no minimum. It hits two of the opponent's specifically mentioned spaces, either two in direct line or one in line and one to the side.

9 Millimeter (light artillery).-There are four 4 for each playing area and each carries four shells. The 9 mm. moves its placement or fires; but whenever two or more of the 9 mm. (light artillery) guns on the board are in continuously adjoining sections, that is, side by side laterally 4 in the same row, they may all fire simultaneously as a battery, as a single move. The moves of placement, however, are always as single units, and not as a battery of a plurality of units. It moves not to exceed three spaces either forward A or backward, or any number of sections laterally in the same row. It fires in a straight line; has a maximum range of seven spaces and no minimum. It hits one of opponents specified spaces in direct line; when in battery, one space for 6 each gun, but the specified spaces to be hit need not be in lateral side by side relation, so long as in direct line and within the seven space range.

Anti-aircraft gun.-There are three for each playing area and each carries two shells. The 6 anti-aircraft gun is used only to shoot down airplanes and cannot shoot at any other objective. It moves one space at a time in any direction, either forward, rearward, laterally or diagonally. It is a defensive gun entirely and guards ý6 its own space or section on which it has placement and any space touching the one on which it is placed; that is, six spaces if it is on an edge section and nine spaces if it is on a centrally located section, i. e., if on section 40 it guards 7{ six spaces and if on 56 it guards nine spaces.

The anti-aircraft gun does not fire across the central barrier or screen. It fires only when an opponent sends over an airplane with a written message for information or discovery of facts 7ý about certain areas. If the Inquiry pertains to any of the spaces guarded by an anti-aircraft gun, the anti-aircraft gun fires a shell and the plane is downed. Such result removes one shell from each anti-aircraft gun in the area guarded; that is, if two or more such guns are in the guarded area, each loses one shell. If such a gun has already exhausted its shells, or if there is no anti-aircraft gun guarding the area covered by the message, the plane is not "downed," and the information requested must be given with the return of the plane. The sending of a plane constitutes a move by the player who sends the plane, but does not constitute a move by the opponent who "downs" the plane, or returns it with a message.

Airplanes.-There are four for each playing area. Planes are used only for reconnaissance, (viewing the opponent player's board or playing o2 area). Sending over a plane constitutes a move by the sender. Each flight may ask for a chart of a contiguous group of six playing sections or spaces, two or three spaces wide and three in length, either laterally or longitudinally; for example, longitudinally, 64, 65, 54, 55, 44, 45, or laterally, 65, 64, 63, 55, 54, 53. The spaces desired to be seen are charted on a paper and handed with the plane to the opponent. If no anti-aircraft gun shoots down the plane, (in which event it is kept by opponent), the equipment in the designated area must be marked on the squares charted and returned with the plane to the sender. Only anti-aircraft guns can down a plane.

15 Infantry.-There are ten units for each playing area. Their playing value does not vary as does the value of the artillery units by firing and replenishing of shells. Each block or unit represents a similar number of infantry men, and may 0 be designated as any desired infantry unit, such as a company or a file or squad, or even a regiment, but since the entire unit may be destroyed by a single shell, realism dictates that a relatively small unit be used as a designation, such 5 as a squad, file or company. At each move, they may move one space in any direction. The infantry is moved up to and on the bridge one space at a time. It remains one move on the bridge and is then placed off the board directly 0 ahead of the front or first row of numbered sections. The bridge may be moved to any place in the first row using one move to make the change, regardless of the number of spaces moved.

Winning or Losing the Game.-The game is y lost by either player having all of his artillery guns destroyed (anti-aircraft guns excluded).

The game is also lost when a player has less than three squads of infantry left on the board, regardless of the number of artillery pieces he may 0 have left.

But if a player is able to move seven squads over the bridge and off the front of the board he wins the game, regardless of how little artillery he has left, or how many artillery or infantry 5 units his opponent has left on the board.

Every three squads of infantry moved over the bridge lessens by one the number required to be left on the board. That is, if three squads are moved over the bridge, it is only necessary to have ) two remaining on the board, and if six are moved over the bridge, it is only necessary to have one left on the board., Having thus described my invention, I claim: 1. In a game having a playing board comprisi ing oppositely disposed playing areas each divided into a similar number of playing sections and a sight barrier adapted for perpendicular erection between the playing areas, an assembly of playing pieces comprising a plurality of movable operating pieces for movement on said sections, including operating pieces of varying types whereby varying playing values may be indicated, a portion of said operating pieces having recesses varying in diameter in respective operating pieces for removable mounting therein of subordinate units for visibly indicating a changeable playing value of such operating piece, and subordinate units of differing types adapted for removable mounting in the recesses of the operating pieces, said operating pieces including a supply piece having a plurality of series of recesses therein for removably receiving said respective types of subordinate units.

2. In a game having a playing board divided into playing sections, an assembly of playing pieces comprising a plurality of movable operating pieces of varying types whereby varying playing values may be indicated, a plurality of said operating pieces having recesses varying in diameter in separate pieces and adapted for removable mounting therein of subordinate units for visibly indicating a changeable playing value of the respective operating pieces, and a plurality of subordinate units adapted for removably fitting into the recesses of the operating pieces, said subordinate units being divided into groups, each group of which is adapted to removably fit into the recesses of one type only of the operating pieces whereby a changeable playing may be indicated in the respective types of operating pieces.

3. In a game having a playing board divided into playing sections, an assembly of playing pieces comprising a plurality of movable operating pieces of varying types whereby varying playing values may be indicated, a plurality of said operating pieces having recesses varying in diameter in separate pieces and adapted for removable mounting therein of subordinate units for visibly indicating a changeable playing value of the respective operating pieces, and a supply piece for playing on said sections and having series of recesses therein adapted for removably receiving a supply of each group of subordinate elements. 4. In a game having a playing board divided into playing sections, an assembly of playing pieces comprising a plurality of movable operating pieces of varying types whereby varying playing values may be indicated, a plurality of said operating pieces having recesses varying in diameter in separate pieces and adapted for removable mounting therein of subordinate units for visibly indicating a changeable playing value of the respective operating pieces, and a supply piece for gc playing on said sections and having series of recesses therein adapted for removably receiving a supply of each group of subordinate elements, one of said operating pieces including clip means for holding a written communication between the players of the game.

5. In a game having a playing board comprising oppositely disposed playing areas each divided into a similar number of playing sections and a sight barrier adapted for perpendicular erection between the playing areas to obscure view of opposed players, an assembly of playing pieces comprising a plurality of movable operating pieces for movement on said sections, said operating pieces being of varying types whereby varying playing values may be indicated, a plurality of said operating pieces having, respectively, differing structural characteristics whereby they are, respectively, adapted for removably and replaceably holding thereon of a specific type of subordinate units, and a plurality of subordinate units adapted for removable and replaceable mounting on said operating pieces for visibly indicating a changeable playing value of such operating pieces, said subordinate units being divided into groups having for each group differing structural characteristics adapted for cooperation with the differing structural characteristics of the respective types of operating pieces whereby said subordinate units in each group are limited to mounting on the respective specific types of the operating pieces.

6. In a game having a playing board comprising oppositely disposed playing areas each divided into a similar number of playing sections and a sight barrier adapted for perpendicular erection between the playing areas to obscure view of opposed players, an assembly of playing pieces comprising a plurality of movable operating pieces for movement on said sections, said operating pieces being of varying types whereby varying playing values may be indicated, a plurality of said operating pieces having, respectively, differing structural characteristics whereby they are, respectively, adapted for removably and replaceably holding thereon of a specific type of subordinate units, and a plurality of subordinate units adapted for removable and replaceable mounting on said operating pieces for visibly indicating a changeable playing value of such operating pieces, said subordinate units being divided into groups having for each group differing structural characteristics adapted for cooperation with the differing structural characteristics of the respective types of operating pieces whereby said Ssubordinate units in each group are limited to mounting on the respective specific types of the operating pieces, said operating pieces including a supply piece having means therein for removably holding a supply of the subordinate units of each group.

JAMES B. GUBBINS.