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Title:
Human hoist
United States Patent 2280396
Abstract:
The invention relates to apparatus for hoisting and then supporting a human being in a position for working upon the rod end of a pumping well walking beam. In pumping oil wells it often becomes necessary for a person to perform some chore at the end of the walking beam, for instance, disconnecting...


Inventors:
Gentry, Cecil R.
Application Number:
US37522041A
Publication Date:
04/21/1942
Filing Date:
01/21/1941
Assignee:
Gentry, Cecil R.
Primary Class:
International Classes:
B66C1/16
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Description:

The invention relates to apparatus for hoisting and then supporting a human being in a position for working upon the rod end of a pumping well walking beam.

In pumping oil wells it often becomes necessary for a person to perform some chore at the end of the walking beam, for instance, disconnecting the rod hanger, or uncoupling the rods from the hanger, etc. Since the beam end is usually some twelve or fifteen feet from the derrick floor, some means must be provided for supporting the man in working position.

Various supporting means have been used for this purpose, for instance, swinging platforms, ladders, and even permanent platforms. The use of a ladder is not practical because of the fact that some other person must steady the same on a floor which is usually oily and slick, and the man upon its upper end cannot exert much leverage in his work without pushing the ladder away from the beam. The other two expedients are quite costly with the result that many operators still use the common painter's ladder. It is also common practice for the workman, at times, to use a usual pipe wrench as a support upon which to stand while working adjacent the end of a walking beam. In this practice, the wrench is frictionally engaged around the polish-rod in such a manner that it extends perpendicularly thereto, and the workman climbs up the rod and stands upon the wrench. This procedure not only injures the smooth surface of the polish rod, which consequently injures the usual stuffing box rubbers through which the rod reciprocates, but, is extremely dangerous to the workman. The wrench often slips upon the oily polish rod and drops the man. It also frequently occurs that the man, in performing his work, falls off the wrench.

The present apparatus is designed so as to accomplish its results with complete safety to the workman supported thereby.

All working crews are usually equipped with hoisting blocks, and in some instances, the men ride the block-hook up to the beam. This method is not practical because when the man has one foot in the hook he must use one arm around the line to keep himself from falling. This leaves only one hand free to accomplish the work.

The present invention is designed for use in connection with the usual block-hook, but is a separate and complete set of tackle, so designed that the man has both hands free to accomplish his work, and also designed so that he can anchor himself to the rod or rod hanger in such a manner that he will not swing away from the work.

The objects of the invention are to provide an economical hoisting apparatus for workmen which will be entirely safe, and will at the same time permit the free usage of both hands; which will permit the workman bodily relaxation, to some extent, while he is supported by the device; which will be durable; and, which will be efficient in accomplishing all of the purposes for which it is intended.

Inthe drawing: Figure 1 is a perspective view of a worker supported by the apparatus in a position to work at the end of a walking beam; Figure 2 is an elevational view of the foot support or stirrup; Figure 3 is a top view of the stirrup; and, Figure 4 is a detail of the leg support.

Like characters of reference designate like parts in all of the figures.

Refer now to the accompanying one-sheet drawing wherein: The reference numeral I indicates the rod supporting end of a usual walking beam with a rod hanger 2 pivotally supported thereby. The numeral 3 indicates the upper end portion of a usual polish rod supported by the lower end of the rod hanger 2. The numeral 4 indicates the hook of a usual hoisting block common to all oil rigs.

The mechanism of the present invention consists substantially of a single sheave block 5 connected to the hook 4 by any means, for instance, a chain 6. A rope 7 is threaded through the block 5 and has a looped end 8 connected to a chain 9.

The lower end of the chain is equipped with a stirrup 10 to receive the worker's foot, preferably the left one.

The stirrup 10 has two oppositely extending projections II equipped at their outer ends with hooks 12. The hooks 12 lie in the plane of the projection II so that one or the other may be hooked around the vertical hanger 2 or, if the man is working lower down, may be hooked around the rod 3.

Intermediate its ends, the chain 9 has a short length 13 with a hook 14 on the free end thereof. The hook 14 is used to also engage the hanger 2 or rod 3 to keep the man from swinging away from his work.

A heavy belt 15 is attached by any usual or desirable means to the chain 9, adjacent the short length 13, and acts to hold the man's body close to the chain 9.

In Figure 4 is best shown a leg strap 16 having snap-hooks 11 at each end. The strap IS is used to encircle the worker's right hand leg just below the hip and permit him to partially sit down during his work. The snap-hooks 17 can be selectively engaged in desired links of the chain 9 so that the workman may assume a comfortable position. In operation, the worker merely steps his left foot into the stirrup and fastens the belt 15 around his waist. His helpers then hoist him to the desired position, and he then engages the hooks 12 and 14 to the hanger 2 or rod 3. Both of his hands are thereby freed to accomplish his work. The leg strap 16 may be brought into operation at any time the worker's left leg becomes tired. The free end of the rope 7 may, of course, be anchored so that the helpers will not have to hold it during the time the work is being accomplished.

Obviously the invention is capable of embodiment in other forms, and I therefore do not wish to be confined in its structure other than I am limited by the scope of the appended claims.

I claim: 1. A workman's hoist including: a pulley block; a line threaded through the block; a stirrup attached to one end of the line; a laterally projecting hook carried by the stirrup for engaging work; a belt attached to the line above the stirrup for encircling a person's waist; and a second hook connected to the line above the stirrup for engaging said work, said hooks co-acting to anchor the workman against swinging movement away from said work.

2. A workman's hoist including: a pulley block; a line threaded through the block; a stirrup attached to one end of the line; a laterally projecting hook carried by the stirrup; a belt attached to the line above the stirrup for encircling a person's waist; a second hook connected to the line above the stirrup, said hooks adapted to anchor the workman against swinging movement away from his work, and a leg strap adapted at both ends to be connected to the line above the stirrup.

3. In a human hoisting mechanism including a pulley block with a line threaded therethrough for hoisting a workman, a stirrup attached to one end of the line and including: a loop for receiving a human foot; and a hook projecting laterally from the loop for engaging work to hold the stirrup in juxtaposition thereto.

4. A workman's hoist including: a line adapted to be drawn over a support for raising a person; a stirrup attached to one end of the line; a laterally projecting hook carried by the stirrup for engaging work; means above the stirrup for holding the person's body against movement away from the line; and anchoring means !above the stirrup for engaging said work and holding the line against movement away from the same.

5. A workman's hoist including: a line adapted to be drawn over a support for raising a person; 'a stirrup attached to one end of the line; a laterally projecting hook carried by the stirrup; means above the stirrup for holding a person's body against movement away from the line; anchoring means above the stirrup for engaging an object and holding the line against movement from said object; and means for attaching the person's leg to the line for holding it in juxtaposition thereto.

CECIL R. GENTRY.