Title:
Coin package
United States Patent 2275424


Abstract:
This invention relates in general to coin packages and to wrappers for coins. Among the objects of the present invention it is aimed to provide an improved wrapper foi coins, especially for wrapping small change such as pennies in packages of two or more so that the same can be dispensed as...



Inventors:
Freedman, Benjamin H.
Application Number:
US32409440A
Publication Date:
03/10/1942
Filing Date:
03/15/1940
Assignee:
Freedman, Benjamin H.
Primary Class:
Other Classes:
206/.8, 206/445
International Classes:
G07D9/00
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Description:

This invention relates in general to coin packages and to wrappers for coins.

Among the objects of the present invention it is aimed to provide an improved wrapper foi coins, especially for wrapping small change such as pennies in packages of two or more so that the same can be dispensed as a unit and avoid the loss of time counting small change, such for instance as two cents or three cents in change, so frequently necessary today where sales taxes are imposed.

It is still another object of the present invention to provide an improved package for small change consisting of a wrapper which will readily facilitate the packaging of the small change and yieldably anchor it against removal, the wrapping element however of which can be quickly removed when desired to remove the small change from the package.

More specifically, it is an object of the present invention to provide a wrapper composed of a material that is at least partly yieldable to facilitate receiving the coins by having sufficient elasticity to retract after receiving the coin effectively to anchor the coins in the package.

More specifically, it is also an object of the invention to provide a wrapper composed of a material that will frictionally anchor the coins against ready removal after once having been positioned in the package.

These and other features, capabilities and advantages of the invention will appear from the sub-joined detail description of specific embodiments thereof illustrated in the accompanying drawing, in whichFigure 1 is a perspective of one embodiment of the invention; Fig. 2 is a section on the line 2-2 of Fig. 1.

Fig. 3 is a plan of the wrapper blank before being formed into a coin receiving tube or envelope; Fig. 4 is a plan of a wrapper blank of another embodiment of the present invention; Fig. 5 is a perspective of a package made with the wrapper illustrated in Fig. 4; Fig. 6 is a plan of a wrapper blank of still another embodiment; Fig. 7 is a perspective of a package made with the wrapper blank illustrated in Fig. 6; and Fig. 8 is a perspective of a wrapper blank of still another embodiment.

In the embodiment illustrated in Figs. 1, 2 and 3, there is shown a wrapper I, see Fig. 3, having a main face 2, the dimension of which from the edge 3 to the edge 4 substantially equals the diameter of the coins, as an instance, the coins of Figs. 1 and 2, but the dimension of the face 2 from the edge 6 to the edge 7 is considerably less than the diameter of the coins 5, so that when the coins are wrapped, the edges 3 and 4 practically aline with the edges of the coins 5, and the edges of the coins, see Fig. 1, extend beyond the edges 6 and 7.

The face 2 is connected to a flap 8 by the conS necting portions 9 and 10 and to the flap I by the connecting portions 12 and 13. The flap 11 preferably has at one end thereof a gummed area 14 which practically corresponds in area to the area of the flap 8 so that, see Fig. 1, when the to blank I is folded into the position shown in Fig. 1 and the area 14 is moistened and pressed against the outer surface of the flap 8, the resulting face formed by the flaps I I and 8 will correspond in area to the area of the face 2, and the end portions of the package consisting on one side in the connecting portions 12 and 13, and on the other side in the connecting portions 9 and 10, have rectangular openings 15 and 16 formed in the ends through which the edges of the coins 5 extend as shown in Fig. 1.

Preferably, to facilitate folding the blank I, the same is provided with the creases or scorings 17 and 18 alining with the edge 19 of the window 15 and forming one edge of the flap 8, also provided with the creases or scorings 20 and 21 alining with the edge 7 of the window 16 and forming one edge of the face 2, also provided with the creases or scorings 22 and 23 alining with the edge 6 of the window 15 and forming one edge of the face 2, and also provided with the creases or scorings 24 and 25 alining with the edge 26 of the window 15 and forming one edge of the flap II. The blank I obviously will be provided with four folds before gluing the :! area 14 onto the flap 8, one fold coinciding with the dotted line 17, edge 19 and dotted line 18, a second fold coinciding with the dotted line 20, edge 7 and dotted line 21, a third fold coinciding with the dotted line 22, edge 6 and dotted o0 line 23, and a fourth fold coinciding with the dotted line 24, edge 26 and dotted line 25.

The dimensions of the connecting portions 9 and 10 from the dotted line 20 to the dotted line 17, and from the dotted line 21 to the dotted line 18 respectively, and also the dimensions of the connecting portions 12 and 13 from the dotted line 24 to the dotted line 22, and from the dotted line 25 to the dotted line 23 respectively, are identical to one another and equal to the thick.0 ness of a plurality of coins for which the package is intended, in the present instance, equal to the thickness of the three coins 5. This fit is intended to be so precise and snug that it will be necessary first to slip in two coins and finally slip in the third coin, the dimension of the face 2 from the edge 6 to the edge 7 with a slight slack provided by the end portions 9, 10, 12 and 13, permitting the easy entrance of two coins and requiring a slight stretching of these connecting 30 portions 9, 10, 12 and 13 when the third coin is thereafter slipped into place. The material of which the blank I is composed is preferably slightly stretchable such as heavy paper, semicardboard, elastic paper fabric, or the like, which is just sufficiently elastic to permit the snug reception of the plurality of coins for which the envelope is made, but sufficiently retractable so that the coins when once received or slipped into the envelope, will be securely anchored against accidental removal. Instead of a single sheet of material such as illustrated in Figs. 1, 2 and 3, a laminated sheet 27 such as illustrated in Fig. 8 may be provided, consisting as an instance of two sheets of paper 28 and 29 with rubber glue or rubber cement securing the two sheets together, and cooperating with the two sheets of paper to impart a stretchable or elastic characteristic to the laminated sheet, or else a laminated sheet such as Pliofilm is used, or else a laminated sheet consisting of a sheet of metal foil and paper bonded together, or a sheet of moldable metal and paper bonded together, or paper and fabric bonded together, or paper and latex bonded together, or glassine paper or ordinary paper bonded together 2~ with either Cellophane or a nitrate cellulose sheet or a sheet having an acetate base. In order to increase the stretchability, either the sheet I or the laminated sheet 27 during the positioning of the coins 5 in the package, and the connecting 3( portions such as an instance 30, 31, 32 and 33 of the blank 34 illustrated in Fig. 4, may be provided with transversely extending corrugations as shown in Figs. 4 and 5.

From the foregoing it will appear that the 3 elasticity or retractability of the wrappers will cooperate with the extended friction-creating faces provided as an instance by the inside of the face 2 of the wrapper shown in Fig. 3 and the inside of the combined face formed by the flaps 4 8 and I I to anchor the coins against accidental removal, such extended friction-creating faces, see Fig. 2, snugly engaging the outer raised portions of the coins to create the co-efficient of friction required to anchor the coins against acci- 4 dental displacement. With certain materials, the corrugations illustrated in Fig. 6 extending longitudinally of the blank 35 there shown such as the corrugations at the connecting portions 36, 37, 38 and 39, have certain decided advantages.

In the first place, if the coins are inserted only from one end as an instance, the end 40 of the package, see Fig. 7, then the corrugations 38 and 36 will not have been stretched and the end 41 will retain its original anchoring power, and only the corrugations 39 and 31 will have been slightly weakened by forcing the coins through the end 40. However, as aforesaid, since sufficient slack is provided by the connecting portions 36, 37, 38 and 39, when only two of three coins are initially inserted to receive the same without stretching the connecting portions 37 and 39 if the coins are inserted through the end 40, the stretching on the connecting portions 37 and 39 will only take place when the last or third coin is inserted and then not only the connecting portions 37 and 39 are required to yield, but the main faces of the blank in a lateral direction as an instance in the direction between the edges 42 and 43 will be required to take up a part of the stretch and consequently the elasticity or retractability of the blank 35 will cooperate with the corrugations 36, 37, 38 and 39 to grip the final coin and consequently the three coins in position against accidental removal.

The package here provided has certain decided advantages. In the first place, a minimum amount of material is required, the two ends, as an instance, the ends 40 and 41 of the package remaining open. In the next place, the blanks 1, 27, 34 or 35 can be cut from a strip of material corresponding in width to the blank.

Still furthermore, the conventional machines today in use can easily be converted to cut a blank I, 27, 34 or 35, deposit the adhesive coating 14, see Fig. 3, fold the strip, and finally glue the flaps 8 and II to one another to form the envelope or tube shown in Figs. 1, 2, 5 and 7.

Still furthermore, the resulting envelope or tube shown in Figs. 1, 5 and 7 presents a large, uninterrupted area, as an instance, the outer surSface of the face 2, outer face of the portion 44 and the outer face 45 of the embodiment illustrated in Fig. 1, the outer surface of the portion 46 and the outer face 47 of the embodiment illustrated in Fig. 5, and the outer surface of the Sportion 48 and the outer face 49 of the embodiment illustrated in Fig. 7 to receive advertising matter, printed matter and the like. And still furthermore, these packages will be used to great advantage with the cashiers of cigar counters in Shotels, restaurants, and the like in those states and cities where sales taxes are imposed and small change, particularly in the denominations of two and three pennies are today required to be counted with almost every sale. With these packages, the cashier may have the two-cent, three-cent and even four-cent packages grouped together and quickly expedite her change-making performance by selecting from these different groups the ready-made odd change of two cents, 0 three cents and four cents.

It is obvious that various changes and modifications may bee e made to the details of construction without departing from the general spirit of the invention as set forth in the appended claims.

I claim: 1. A coin wrapper for wrapping around a stack of coins so to leave diametrically opposed edges of the coins exposed, comprising an elongated sheet of flexible, yieldable material having a pair 5o of spaced slots transverse to the length thereof, the material between the slots being adapted to overlie part of one end of the stack and being of a length less than the diameter of said coins, the height of said slots also being less than said diameter whereby to allow only said diametrically opposed edges to project therethrough, respectively, the combined width of the material at each side of the slots being greater than the width of said material between the slots and forming overlapping flaps for covering part of the other end of said stack, and fastening means for holding said overlapping flaps together.

2. A coin wrapper as claimed in claim 1, the width of said slots being substantially equal to 65 the height of said stack.

3. A coin wrapper as claimed in claim i, the material at each end of said slots being pleated.

4. A coin wrapper as claimed in claim 1, the material at each end of said slots having pleats therein extending crosswise of said elongated sheet.

BENJAMIN H. FIREEDMAN