Title:
Cut stone
United States Patent 2265316


Abstract:
This application relates to cut stones, such as diamonds, and more particularly to gems having a figure, such as a cross: in the surface thereof while retaining or even increasing the brilliance and play of light in the gem. In the past it has been suggested to cut a cross in the top of a...



Inventors:
Schenck, Ernest G. H.
Application Number:
US36087940A
Publication Date:
12/09/1941
Filing Date:
10/12/1940
Assignee:
Schenck, Ernest G. H.
Primary Class:
Other Classes:
D11/90
International Classes:
A44C17/00
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Description:

This application relates to cut stones, such as diamonds, and more particularly to gems having a figure, such as a cross: in the surface thereof while retaining or even increasing the brilliance and play of light in the gem.

In the past it has been suggested to cut a cross in the top of a round stone but so doing has reduced the brilliance of the stone, and cutting of a figure in the surface of an emerald cut stone has never before been considered feasible without 1 impairing the brilliance of the gem.

It is an object of my invention to cut a stone, such as a diamond, in square, emerald, rectangular or other cut, with its face a cross-shaped central figure without materially diminishing the I brilliance of the stone as occurred in the past, but even increasing the brilliance and play of light of the stone.

It is another object of my invention to cut a stone so as to concentrate its brilliance in a cross in the face of the stone.

It is another object of my invention to produce a raised cross with angularly cut stones.

It is another object of my invention to cut a stone with a cross on the surface of a polygonal stone with the straight lines of the polished polygonal girdle untouched.

Other objects of my invention will be apparent to those skilled in the art from the following description of the accompanying drawing. In this drawing I have shown preferred embodiments of my invention, but it will be understood that numerous changes may be made in the specific embodiments shown without departing from the scope of my invention.

In the drawing: Fig. 1 is a top elevation of an "emerald cut" stone made in accordance with my invention; Fig. 2 is the side elevation of a stone such as shown in Fig. 1; Fig. 3 is a top elevational view of a stone cut in accordance with my invention having a polygonal straight-cut outline.

Referring first to Fig. 1, I have shown a stone, such as a diamond, 1, having a raised cross 3 on the crown or upper portion, this cross being bordered by other facets.

Around the stone and parallel with the lines of the girdle 5 may be one or a number of other lines 6 and 1 parallel to the girdle 5. It is an important feature of my invention that these lines be parallel, and that the axes of the cross 8, 9, are parallel to the lines of the girdle 5.

In the past emerald cut stones have always had flat top surfaces which seriously limited the brilliance: and play of light, obtainable in such astone:. It was never believed: practical,, however,. to give an. emerald, cut stone other than a: flat:top, surface or table because, when that was: done, the: stone assuned a "shattered" appearance which reduced its brilliance and ruined its perfection of appearance. I have now found, however, that if the axis of the figure, such as of the cross 8 and 9 are parallel to the lines of the girdle of the 0 emerald cut stone it is possible to increase the play of light in the stone and the brilliance of the stone while obtaining the symbolic pattern and losing none of the effective beauty of the diamond.

In Fig. 3, I have shown a stone in which the one axis of the top surface figure, e. g., the cross, is parallel to the sides of the stone but the other axis is at an angle with the adjacent sides. This sort of cutting with straight line girdle at the ends of the cross or other figure in the face, even though not strictly parallel to the plane of the adjacent part of such figure, is much superior to the old rounded girdle stone with a similar figure; although it does not possess the full advantages of the form of cutting shown in Figs. 1 and 2 unless the adjacent lines of the girdle are parallel to the planes of the figure.

In any of the forms shown in the drawing, it is especially advantageous to have the planes of SO adjacent facets of the pavillion of the stone below the girdle meet in lines, e. g., the lines 10 and 1 of Fig. 2, parallel to the girdle. It is the combination of the lines 5 of the girdle parallel to the lires 6, 7, 10 and 11, near the girdle and parallel to the lines of the cross or other figure 3 which results in the great play of light and brilliance in the stone cut according to my invention.

It is desirable to avoid having too many facets in the pavilion of the stone, below the girdle, as their presence may give the stone the undesired shattered appearance. However, a number of facets may be cut without giving this undesirable shattered appearance so long as all are respectively parallel to one of the axes of the '15 cross or other figure in the top surface of the stone.

While I have shown in the above figures only two forms of stones, it is to be understood that stones may be cut in a number of ways while Mo still following my invention; and, for example, three sides of the stone may be cut in the usual emerald form and the fourth side may have a number of facets around the girdle like a cathedral window. As long as the main axes of the .35 central figure are kept parallel to a number of the sides of the girdle of a stone a great increase in the brilliance of stone will be attained.

Although my invention is designed primarily to develop the beauty of precious stones, it is applicable also to stones and materials of lesser value, and I have used the term "gem" broadly to include semi-precious stones and imitation or artificial stones as well as the natural precious stones.

In Figs. 1 and 2 I have shown the raised cross figure to be ridged, while in Fig. 3 I have shown a form in which each arm of the raised cross figure is a flat facet. Either of these forms is within the scope of my invention without regardto the particular form of stone on which they are used.

What I claim is: 1. A cut gem having a plurality of facets below the girdle, each of said facets having a definite axis, and a figure on the top of the stone 23 comprised of a plurality of facets each having a definite- axis, the axes of at least some of the facets defining the figure being parallel respectively to axes of the facets below the girdle.

2. An emerald cut gem having a rectangular girdle, a raised cross figure on the top face of said gem comprised of a plurality of facets having definite axes, and a plurality of facets below the girdle, said facets also having definite axes all parallel respectively to the adjacent lines of the girdle, the axes of the facets defining the cross being parallel respectively to lines of the girdle.

3. An emerald cut gem as claimed in claim 2 in which the facets constituting the cross are plane and slope upwardly to the point of intersection.

S4. An emerald cut gem having a plurality of facets below the girdle, each of said facets having a definite axis and all of them lying parallel respectively to-the adjacent lines of the girdle, lines above the girdle parallel to the lines of the girdle, and a figure on the top of the stone comprised of facets having definite axes which are respectively parallel to lines of the girdle.

ERNEST G. H. SCHENCK.