Title:
Body conditioning apparatus suit
United States Patent 2255751


Abstract:
This invention relates to air ventilating apparatus and, more particularly, it relates to a suit in which air may be circulated in order to cool the wearer. Ordinarily, whenever persons desire ventilation, the entire space or room occupied is ventilated. Such a procedure is not practical under...



Inventors:
Bancel, Paul A.
Application Number:
US30963639A
Publication Date:
09/16/1941
Filing Date:
12/16/1939
Assignee:
INGERSOLL RAND CO
Primary Class:
Other Classes:
2/2.11, 4/536, 165/46, 454/370, 607/107
International Classes:
A41D13/002
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Description:

This invention relates to air ventilating apparatus and, more particularly, it relates to a suit in which air may be circulated in order to cool the wearer.

Ordinarily, whenever persons desire ventilation, the entire space or room occupied is ventilated. Such a procedure is not practical under many circumstances as, for instance, in mines where the cost of ventilating an entire mine would be prohibitive even though it were found practical. In such circumstances a person may greatly desire ventilation and cooling since the ambient temperature may be in the neighborhood of 100* F. and consequently, such a person is also at such a temperature. Furthermore, the humidity is so high that a person can get no relief by the evaporation of body moisture or perspiration with the result that he suffers considerably. If the metabolic heat could be absorbed or removed from such a person, he would be cooled and enabled to work although the ambient temperature was high.

In order to remove the metabolic heat, I propose subjecting the person's body to an atmosphere of air at ambient or body temperature which is dry enough to absorb the metabolic heat solely by evaporation of moisture from the wearer's body. Dry air, or air of low relative humidity for such a purpose, may be produced conveniently in some localities by expanding compressed air which has been cooled to ambient temperature and dried at about 100 pounds gage pressure to substantially atmospheric pressure.

Accordingly, it is an object of the present invention to provide a method and means to cool and ventilate a person's body.

It is an object of the present invention to provide means whereby the metabolic heat of a person may be removed by use of air of low relative humidity.

Another object is to provide means whereby a person may be cooled by the evaporation of body moisture into a medium of low relative humidity.

Still another object is to provide means whereby compressed air may be expanded and employed to cool and ventilate a person's body.

It is an additional object of this invention to provide a suit or garment wherein a ventilated space is provided around the wearer's body.

It is also an object to provide a suit having a ventilated space about the wearer's body which permits freedom of movement by the wearer.

Yet another object is to provide a suit having a space about the wearer's body wherein air is continually supplied to the space in order to ventilate it.

A further object is to provide a suit having a ventilated space about the wearer's body in which air is introduced in such a manner that it travels over the entire body of the wearer before escaping from the suit.

These and other objects will be apparent from the following disclosure of which the drawing forms a part and in which Figure 1 shows a sectional view of the present invention, Figure 2 is a view partly in elevation and partly in section of the present invention, Figure 3 is a view taken along line 3-3 of Fig. 2, and Figure 4 is a sectional view taken along line 4-4 of Fig. 3.

Figure 5 is an elevational view of the check valve shown in Fig. 4.

With reference to the drawing, it will be seen that the body is covered by a close fitting absorbent inner garment, such as a woolen garment, in order to absorb any moisture or perspiration and to provide a uniform dispersion of such moisture into the surrounding air. With such a garment, the cooling effect is uniformly spread over the wearer's skin, and, at the same time, the garment acts as a "buffer" in that it prevents direct contact between the wearer and the warm inner surface of the suit 2 which completely envelopes the wearer's body except for the head, hands and feet. The suit 2 is made of some material which is impervious to air and appropriate seals 3 are provided at the wearer's ankles to prevent any leakage between the suit and the ankles. Similar seals 5 are placed at the wearer's wrists and, for the same purpose, a seal 7 surrounds the wearer's neck.

The suit may be donned by opening the "zipper" 9 at the front of the suit and the belt II which surrounds the suit at the waist. Once the suit has been put on and the felt fastened, air supplied by conduit 13, from a suitable source, Is introduced into the suit. In the present instance such air is supplied by the compressor 14, provided with an aftercooler 16, or a long pipe line provided with traps, or the like, to reduce the temperature of the compressed air to ambient temperature and remove moisture in the air. Obviously, the air supplied directly by the compressor is at a high pressure.- By expanding this air in the manner explained hereinafter the pressure is reduced to a pressure slightly greater than atmospheric pressure. The conduit 13 is supported at the wearer's back on a hook I1 clamped to the belt II and the suit 2 by rivet IT.

From the back of the suit the conduit 13 extends to the front of the suit where it Is coupled by means of coupling 19 to another conduit 21. As shown in Fig. 4, the end of conduit 13 is provided with a bushing 23 having a central channel 25 and provided with threads 27. The bushing 23 is designed to cooperate with the member 29. The conduit 21 is supplied at the open end thereof with the nipple 31' having bayonet points 33 adapted to be inserted through the slots 35 in the rear wall 37 of the member 19. Adjacent the open end of the nipple 31 a partition wall 39 extends across the bore 41 of the nipple and has an orifice 43 centrally located therein. When the air supplied by the compressor at a high pressure passes through the orifice, it expands substantially by the irreversible adiabatic process with the result that, as the pressure decreases and the volume increases, the relative humidity of the air is greatly lowered, while the temperature is substantially unchanged.

Within the member 19 is placed a guide wall 45 on which the nipple 31 rests when it is inserted in the member. The nipple is held within the member 19 by the co-action of the bayonet points 33 and the rear wall 37.

Between the bushing 23 and the guide wall 45 a rubber washer 47 is placed which surrounds the end of the nipple 31. This washer acts as a cushion for the check valve 49, lying between the bushing 23 and the nipple 31.

The check valve is provided with holes 51 of sufficient diameter so that they will not be entirely covered by the end of the nipple 31 when that nipple pushes the check valve away from the seat or washer 47. Since the member 29 is connected to the bushing 23 by threads 27, the member 29 will be continually secured to the conduit 13. If the nipple 31 is not held in the member I9, the air pressure supplied through conduit 13 will hold the check valve 49 on the seat provided by washer 47 and thus prevent escape of air from the conduit 13. However, when the nipple 31 is inserted into the member 19, it will remove the valve 49 from its seat, permitting the passage of air around the valve 49 through the holes iI and through the orifice 43 to the bore 41 of the nipple. As has been pointed out, the bayonet points 33 will serve to enable the nipple to maintain the valve away from its seat.

The conduit 21 connects the nipple 31' with the fitting 63 located at the side of the suit. The fitting 53 Is provided with appropriatepassages to permit the air from the conduit 21 to enter the channel 55 formed within the suit by a flap 51 of the same material as the suit. From the fitting 53 a conduit 59 extends around the 6o suit to the opposite side thereof and connects with another fitting 61, similar in design to the fitting 53 which serves the same purpose in that it supplies air to the channel 63 formed within the suit.. The channels 55 and 63 are sealed from the inside of the suit and extend to the wearer's ankles. Adjacent the wearer's ankles ports 65 are formed in the walls of the channel so that air supplied to the channel may flow therethrough and into the space between the suit 7C and the wearer to thereby inflate the suit to a certain extent. Since the air supplied is slightly above atmospheric pressure and since it cannot escape at either the wearer's ankles, neck or wrists, some means, such as the exhaust ports 6, located adjacent the wearer's wrists, must be provided in order that there will be a circulation of air over the wearer's body.

By providing the inlet ports 65 near the wearer's ankles and the exhaust ports 61 in close proximity to the wearer's wrists, it is obvious that the air introduced into the suit must travel over the entire body of the wearer before it is exhausted to the atmosphere. In order that the belt shall not prevent the passage of air by the wearer's waist, corrugations 69, 70, 71 and 73, formed of the same material as the suit, are provided within the suit. It will thus be seen that a ventilating suit has been provided which enables dehumidified air to travel freely over the wearer's body in order that the wearer may be cooled.

I claim: 1. In a ventilating suit for a human body comprising at least one layer of flexible material impervious to air forming an enclosure about the body, seals on the legs, arms and neck of the suit, a belt on the suit, a coupling on the belt adapted for connection to a source of air under pressure, a conduit connected to the coupling and extending around said belt, channels formed inside the suit extending down the pants legs of the suit, connections between the conduit and the channels, ports in the channels to discharge air from the channels to the enclosure, and ports in the sleeves to discharge air from the enclosure to the atmosphere.

2. In a ventilating suit for a human body comprising at least one layer of a flexible material impervious to air and providing a space between the body and the suit, a belt on the suit, a coupling on the belt adapted to be connected to a source of air under pressure, a conduit on the coupling to convey air around the waist of the suit, a channel formed on either side of the suit in and independent of the air space and extending adjacent the bottom of the legs of the suit, means to connect the conduit to said channels, ports in the channels adjacent the bottom of the suit through which air may enter said space from the conduits, and exhaust ports adjacent the outer end of the suit sleeves to discharge air from the suit to atmosphere.

3. In a ventilating suit for a human body comprising at least one layer of a flexible material impervious to air and providing a space between the body and the suit, means to supply air to the suit, a channel to receive the air supplied and conduct it down a leg of the suit, a port in the conduit to discharge air into the suit air space, and an exhaust port in a sleeve of the suit to discharge air from the air space to atmosphere.

4. In a ventilating suit for a human body comi prising a layer of flexible material impervious to air adapted upon inflation to remain out of contact with the body, means to seal the suit adjacent the neck, hands and feet of the suit against the escape of air from the suit, means to supply air to the suit, sealed channels formed of said suit material on the suit having ports communicating with the enclosure formed by the suit and adapted to conduct air supplied to the suit to the ports, and exhaust ports provided on the sleeves of the suit to discharge the air from the enclosure.

5. In a ventilating apparatus for a human body comprising a suit made of at least one layer of flexible material impervious to air forming an enclosure about the body, seals on the legs, arms and neck of the suit, a belt on the suit, a compressor adapted to supply air under pressure at ambient temperature, a coupling on the belt adapted for connection to the compressor, an orifice associated with the coupling to expand and lower the relative humidity of the air supplied by the compressor, a conduit connected to the, coupling and extending around said belt, channels formed inside the suit extending down the pants legs of the suit, connections between the conduit and the channels, ports in the channels to discharge air from the channels to the enclosure, and ports In the sleeves to discharge air from the enclosure to the atmosphere.

6. In apparatus of the character described, a moisture absorbent garment for a person's body, a suit of air impervious material forming an enclosure for the body, a compressor to supply dehumidified air under pressure at ambient temperature, a belt on the suit, a coupling on the belt connected to the compressor, an orifice in the coupling to expand and lower the relative humidity of the air supplied by the compressor, means in the suit to introduce the dehumidified air adjacent the wearer's ankles, and means on the suit to discharge air from the suit adjacent the wearer's wrists.

PAUL A. BANCEL.