Title:
Arrow nock
United States Patent 2245187


Abstract:
The invention relates to arrows used in archery. It is an object of the invention to provide an arrow which is constructed to provide a spring action in addition to the impetus received from the bow string so as to increase the trajectory force of the arrow. A further object constitutes the...



Inventors:
Julius, Donash
Application Number:
US30626239A
Publication Date:
06/10/1941
Filing Date:
11/27/1939
Assignee:
Milton, Weiss H.
Armin, Hirsch
Primary Class:
International Classes:
F42B6/06
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Description:

The invention relates to arrows used in archery.

It is an object of the invention to provide an arrow which is constructed to provide a spring action in addition to the impetus received from the bow string so as to increase the trajectory force of the arrow.

A further object constitutes the provision of an improved nock which provides resiliency so as to obtain a greater impetus with less effort than possible with known arrows.

A still further object constitutes the provision of a nock which may be readily applied to existing arrows, and which obviates the drag normally existing when shooting the arrow.

With these and other objects in view, which will become apparent from a perusal of the invention, the latter comprises the means described in the following specification, particularly pointed out in the claims forming a part thereof, and illustrated in the accompanying drawing, in which: Fig. 1 is an elevational view of an arrow to which my invention has been applied, Fig. 2 is an elevational view of my improved nock, Fig. 3 is a side view of the nock, Fig. 4 is a bottom plan view of the nock, Fig. 5 is a view of a bow and arrow, and Fig. 6 is a fragmentary end view of the bow string and arrow.

Referring to the several views in the drawing, 10 designates a rigid bow, to the ends of which is secured a cord or string II.

The arrow generally designated by 12 comprises a shaft 13, a pointed end 14 secured to the shaft in any appropriate or preferred manner.

The parts thus far described are standard equipment and form no part of the invention.

To the other end of the shaft is secured a nock member generally designated by 15. The nock member comprises a sleeve 16 which fits over the reduced end 17 of the shaft. The sleeve 16 has integrally secured thereto two leaf springs 13 and 19 of considerable length and spaced apart about 180°.

The leaf springs 18, 19 are folded back toward the sleeve into curved ends 20 and 21, respectively, between which the bow string II is received to hold the arrow in place preparatory to shooting.

While the drawing shows one embodiment of the invention, it is not the intention to be limited to the precise construction and arrangement of parts as shown.

I, therefore, wish to include all changes and modifications constituting departures within the scope of the invention, as defined in the appended claims.

I claim: 1. An arrow terminating in a pair of leaf springs, each spring being folded inwardly to terminate adjacent the end of the arrow, said leaf springs being arranged within the tubular plane defined by the arrow.

2. An arrow comprising a shaft, a sleeve mounted on one end of said shaft and formed with integral arms extending longitudinally, said arms being folded inwardly and terminating adjacent said sleeve.

3. An arrow comprising a shaft, a sleeve mounted on one end of said shaft, spaced arms extending longitudinally from said sleeves, said arms being bent inwardly and toward said sleeve to form concavo-convex spring portions.

4. An attachment for arrows comprising a sleeve, and spaced arms extending longitudinally from said sleeve, said arms being bent inwardly and toward said sleeve to form a nock.

5. A nock member comprising a sleeve, and integral spaced arms extending longitudinally from said sleeve, said arms being folded toward said sleeve and terminating in curved portions to provide a nock.

JULIUS DONASH.