Title:
Dripless spout
United States Patent 2241840


Abstract:
My invention relates to a dripless spout for vessels especially those made of ceramic material e. g. china. According to my invention, an outside groove is cut into the underside of the end of the spout, said groove being in connection with the groove which is situated on the inside 4f the spout.



Inventors:
Christoph, Achtziger
Application Number:
US22637838A
Publication Date:
05/13/1941
Filing Date:
08/23/1938
Assignee:
Firm, Porzellanfabrik Weiden GE.
Primary Class:
Other Classes:
222/571, D07/312
International Classes:
B65D23/06
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Description:

My invention relates to a dripless spout for vessels especially those made of ceramic material e. g. china.

According to my invention, an outside groove is cut into the underside of the end of the spout, said groove being in connection with the groove which is situated on the inside 4f the spout.

By the device shaped according to/my invention, the drop which, after the liquid has been poured out, remains hanging at the underside of the end of the spout and is held in the outside, groove is drawn through the opening into the inner groove.

The outside groove, applied according to my invention, in connection with the openng, forms the shortest way possible from the spot where the drop forms to the interior groove. Therefore even larger drops are drawn back with certainty, and this drawing back process already takes place if the vessel is only slightly turned back from the pouring position.

Furthermore, my invention has the advantage that the grooves serving for the holding and drawing back of the drop are open, therefore they can be easily cleaned. The wall of the end of the spout itself maintains its full thickness, and thus its resistance against being broken is not diminished by applying my invention.

The accompanying drawings illustrate the application of my invention to two spouts of dif- 3 ferent constructions, both made of ceramic material e. g. china. The spouts are shown: in Figs. 1 and 6 as vertical sections, in Figs. 2 and 7 as side views, in Figs. 3 and 8 as front views, in Figs. 4 and 9 as bottom views, and in Figs. 5 and 10 as top views.

In the innerside of the interior of the spout a (Figs. 1-5) there is provided an inner groove b which merges near its outer end by an opening or aperture c into the gorge d of the downwardly 4 bulged end of the lip of the spout at a point below the pouring edge g of the lip.

In the underside of the lip of the spout there is provided a longitudinal open outer groove e which, by means of the opening c, is in horizon- 4 tal communication with the inner groove b.

After the pouring of the fluid, there remains at the underside of the pouring edge or lip f a drip drop which is held by the outside groove e owing to the action of surface tension, and is completely drawn into the groove e. If the drop is large, the part of it which hangs downward out of the groove is prevented from falling down by the surface tension or coherency of the fluid operating over a considerable perimeter. In any case, the drop hanging in or at the outside groove e is held by the opening c in the path of the back flow of fluid in the inner groove b returning, after the action of pouring, down the spout. The surface tension of the fluid in the passages e-o--b is strong enough to sustain the drop hanging outside the spout and cause it to be drawn back into the spout even when the vessel is only slightly brought back into vertical position, because the structure operates substantially wholly by surface tension rather than by gravity.

S In Figs. 5-10, there is shown at the interior of the spout near its mouth a groove b. At the end of the spout and at the underside of the pouring lip f there is cut an outer groove e.

The inner groove b and outer groove e are in communication with one another by the opening or passage c. In this modification the end of the spout is not bulged down into a drooping lip as in Figs. 1 and 2 but is continued substantially horizontally to the end of the spout (as shown in Fig. 7). Therefore the device which serves for drawing back the drip drop can be applied without material alteration of the usual spout forms.

The outer groove e is considerably prolonged towards the vessel, so that it merges at the opening c into the inner groove b below the point f, where the surface of the lip of the spout turns 0downward. In view thereof, and because of the end of the lip having a surface of relatively slight curvature, the remaining drop which forms at I after the pouring of the fluid ceases to maintain its tear-drop form; the drop tends to 5wet and spread over said lip surface and to run along the outer groove e as a thread of liquid, to the opening c, which communicates with the inner groove b, from which the liquid flows down inside the spout, entrained by the back flow of 0liquid in the spout.

In this way the remainder of the liquid which returns down the spout after pouring is prevented from running down the outside surface 5 of the spout and from falling as a drop. The remainder of the liquid is drawn back immediately after the pouring is finished, and even before the vessel is brought back into a vertical position. Thus the danger of dripping is avoided Sirrespective of how the vessel may be handled.

I claim: 1. A spout for pouring vessels comprising an open outer groove on the pouring lip end and on the underside of the spout, said outer groove beSing provided and extending in a horizozital plane, a passage extending through the spout from the inner end of the outer groove to the inside of the spout, and an inner groove on the inside surface of the spout in communication with the passage by means of the outer end of the inner groove, the spout terminating in a fiat curve and the outer groove being extended through the wall of the spout and down toward the vessel terminating in the downwardly extending wall of the spout.

2. Non drip spout for pouring vessels especially of ceramic ware comprising a spout lip and a pouring edge in which the under face of the spout lip has a groove therein extending approximately horizontally from the front face of the lip close below the pouring edge of the lip, said groove communicating through a full circumference aperture with the inner wall of the spout and said groove and aperture being of crosssectional dimension for maintaining effective surface tension in the liquidof the drip drop.

3. Non drip spout for pouring vessels especially of ceramic ware comprising a spout lip and a pouring edge in which the under face of the spout lip has a groove therein extending approximately'horizontally from the front face of the lip close below the -pouring edge of the lip, said groove communicating through a full circumference aperture with a groove extending downwardly in the inner wall of the spout from a point near the pouring edge, said first-mentioned groove and aperture being of cross-sec-tional dimension for maintaining effective surface tension in the liquid of the drip drop.

4. Non drip spout according to claim 2 having an area of relatively slight curvature at the front of the pouring lip above and around the end of the groove in the under face of the lip. 5. Non drip spout according to claim 3 having an area of relatively slight curvature at the front of the pouring lip above and around the end of the groove in the under face of the lip.

6. Non drip spout according to claim 3 in which the groove in the inner wall of the spout merges smoothly into the aperture at a point below the pouring edge of the 'ip.

CHRISTOPH ACHTZIGER.