Title:
Apparatus for cleaning vehicles
United States Patent 2221876


Abstract:
This invention relates to apparatus for cleansing vehicles and more Particularly to a washei for thoroughly cleansing all of the exterior portions of a vehicle without manual assistance and with a minimum of attention. The cleansing and polishing apparatus will be fully disclosed herein in...



Inventors:
Mackin, Thomas A.
Application Number:
US65900833A
Publication Date:
11/19/1940
Filing Date:
02/28/1933
Assignee:
Mackin, Thomas A.
Primary Class:
Other Classes:
134/46, 134/49, 134/58R, 134/165, 134/180, 239/201, 239/207, 239/310, 239/549, 451/75, 451/101, 451/102
International Classes:
B60S3/04
View Patent Images:



Description:

This invention relates to apparatus for cleansing vehicles and more Particularly to a washei for thoroughly cleansing all of the exterior portions of a vehicle without manual assistance and with a minimum of attention.

The cleansing and polishing apparatus will be fully disclosed herein in connection with a specific embodiment Particularly adapted for cleansing locomotive engines. This application is an improvement on my prior patent No. 1,931,444, granted October 17, 1933, and patent No. 2,057,388, granted October 13, 1936.

Prior to my invention disclosed in the earlier filed patents above referred to, locomotives had been cleaned by operators walking around and impinging high velocity streams of water, compressed air and heavy oil in a haphazard manner upon the exterior surface of the locomotive engine. I disclosed in the prior patents, before mentioned, methods and apparatus whereby locomotives can be washed by low velocity streams of cleansing liquid simultaneously contacting every portion of the locomotive lying within a narrowly restricted zone, the washing zone progressing from end to end of the vehicle.

I have discovered that a vehicle may be cleansed by directing upon its exterior surface thin film-like sprays of liquid and I have made the further discovery that the cleansing effect of the thin sheet-like films of liquid is enhanced if they strike the surface to be cleansed at some angle less than a right angle measured between the stream and the portion of the surface already cleansed. The cleansing action of the streams is 33 further enhanced by progressing over the surface toward the direction in which they are Inclined.

This gives the effect of pushing the deposit of dirt and foreign matter ahead of the cleansing stream. A plurality of the sheet-like streams or sprays of fan shape may be made to follow each other closely over the surface to be cleansed.

The present application will disclose fully apparatus for effectively carrying out the novel methods involving cleansing by sheet-like sprays, and more particularly inclined sheet-like sprays, for washing railway rolling stock and locomotive engines, in practice of the cleansing methods to be disclosed herein.

S Accordingly, it is a primary object of my invention to provide novel apparatus for thoroughly cleansing the entire exterior of the vehicle including the top, bottom, and sides thereof by a single operation.

It is a further object of this invention to provide novel apparatus for cleansing the vehicle by film-like sprays of fan shape moving progressively over the exposed surfaces of the vehicle from end to end thereof.

Another object of my invention is to provide - novel means for cleansing solely by a spray in the r form of unbroken sheets or films of liquid, directed at an angle with respect to the surface to be cleansed toward the untreated portion of the surface, to push the accumulated foreign matter and dirt away from the clean surface and in the direction of progression of the cleansing spray.

Still another and related object of my Invention is to provide novel spray means for cleansing by a plurality of thin, unbroken sheet-like sprays of fan shape inclined toward the direction in which the sprays progress over the surface to be cleansed, and arranged so that the plurality of sprays reaches any given part of the surface with the sheet or film-like characteristics of the individual sprays unchanged.

A further related object of the invention resides in the provision of a new nozzle designed to project a thin film or sheet-like stream of liquid of a thickness approximating that of thin cardboard.

A still further object of the invention resides in the arrangement of a plurality of the new nozzles disclosed herein in staggered relationship to project a series of overlapping, non-interfering, sheet-like sprays lying in closely spaced parallel planes.

The novel apparatus according to this invention is effective to remove deposits caused by the settling of products of combustion on the exteror surfaces of the locomotive engine and in the numerous crevices in and about the auxiliary apparatus mounted on the jacket.

On roads where soft coal is burned the products of combustion are effectively removed with .the apparatus of this invention, and after removal thereby, the surface is conditioned to retard further formation of such deposits. After removal of the accumulated combustion stains the locomotive may be cleansed in any manner or washed and polished in one operation by practicing the methods and employing the apparatus disclosed in my copending applications above referred to. However, my improved apparatus disclosed herein may be used most effectively to remove the deposits of combustion products and to wash and polish the entire locomotive, including the parts lying beneath it in one operation without manual assistance.

It is therefore a still further object of this invention to provide apparatus for removing stains and deposits caused by accumulation of products of combustion by a single washing operation, and this phase of the invention resides further in the provision of new cleansing solutions to effectively remove combustion stains and deposits of matter accumulated as a result of burning soft coal.

A still further object of the invention is to provide novel fluid supply means for an automatic washing apparatus which is fully automatic in operation and responds to movement of a vehicle to be washed, to supply fluid incorporating definite and predetermined quantities of solvent ingredients and polishing elements.

Still another and related object of the invention resides in the provision of combined electrical and fluid control arrangements for said fluid supply means, involving a minimum of electrical wiring and operating the control valves and the fluid pressure producing means in a predetermined sequence to prevent water hammer and strain on the piping and valves.

Still another and related object of this invention resides in the provision of fluid pressure operated valves, the admission of fluid pressure to the control means of which is controlled by approach of the vehicle to the washie t sng zone, so that the operation of the fluid pressure operated valves is retarded through delay in application of full fluid pressure to the control means of the valves to prevent the nozzles of the machine from receiving fluid under full pressure until the tnozzle carrying standards have reached washing position.

Still another object of my invention is to provide an automatic locomotive washing apparatus movable to and from washing position by an electric motor under control of a single relay energized from a track circuit comprising a section of track adjacent the washer.

Still another object of my invention is to provide a vehicle washing system embodying a plurality of automatic washers and a common supply valve installation.

Still another object of the invention is to provide an automatic vehicle washer having movable standards arranged adjacent the path traveled by a vehicle during the washing operation and arranged to swing toward the rearmost part of the vehicle immediately after it passes the washing standards for purposes of directing cleansing sprays from the standards over the whole area of the end of the vehicle.

Further objects of my invention will appear in the following disclosure of my preferred method and apparatus and are defined by the terms of the appended claims.

In the drawings: Figure 1 is a perspective view illustrating the sprays and general arrangement of the nozzles in relation to a locomotive.

Figure 2 is a diagrammatic view of the piping and fluid supply connections for preferred embodiments of the invention.

Figure 3 is a top plan view of the washing station of Figure 1 with parts omitted.

Figure 4 is a sectional elevation of the washing station of Figure 3, taken on line 4-4 illustrating in detail the piping arrangement and supports.

Figure 5 is a view similar to Figure 4 illustrating in detail the washing standards and the operating mechanism therefor, certain of the parts shown in Figure 4 being omitted for the sake of clearness of illustration.

Fig. 5a is a plan view of the bottom spray pipe.

Figure 6 is a view in plan of the valve arrangement and piping for supplying washing fluid to 70 two washing stations.

Figure 7 is a view in section on line 7-7, taken through the pit shown in Figure 6 and illustrating in elevation the automatic valve arrangement shown thereon.

Figure 8 is an elevational view of one of the standards comprising part of the washing apparatus with the nozzles in position.

Figure 9 is a circuit diagram of an automatic control arrangement for the preferred embodiment of my washing apparatus. Figure 10 is a diagram of the circuit connections of a slightly modified form of control arrangement.

Figure 11 is a view in elevation of a preferred form of nozzle used with the standard of Figure 8. Figures 12 and 13 are elevational views of the inner and outer faces respectively of the orifice portion of the nozzle of Figure 11.

The invention will be hereinafter described as an automatic washer for cleansing railway rolling stock and particularly locomotive engines moved on a track adjacent the washer. While I have chosen to illustrate my invention in connection with a locomotive washer, it is to be understood that the invention may be effectively practiced in the washing of any kind of vehicle and could be used to advantage to wash buses and automobiles.

Referring to the drawings in which like reference characters designate like parts, numeral 4 designates generally a foundation comprising two foundation sections 6 and 7 and a connection section 8. Foundation 4 serves as a waste receptacle to catch the washing liquids so that they may be collected for treatment and recirculation or drained to a waste sewer. Sidewalls 9 and 10 o3 of the connecting section 8 carry girders 12 which support a railway track section II upon which locomotives or other railway rolling stock to be cleaned is adapted to run through the washing station. The cross ties of track section II rest on said walls which extend from connecting section 8 to the longitudinal boundaries of foundation sections 6 and 1.

Foundation section 6 is provided with a transverse section 14 and a pit 16 joined by a connecting trough or channel 17. A drain pit 18 is formed at the outer end of channel 14, and is provided with a suitable waste connection 19. A transverse depression 20 in foundation section 1 aligns with the channel between walls 9 and 10 of foundation section 8 which in turn aligns wtih transverse channel 14.

The long communicating passage or channel so provided, beginning at pit 16 and ending with transverse channel 20 serves as a drain trough to pit 18 and as a protective housing for the piping and mechanical linkage to be described.

A framework of longitudinally arranged channel members 21, 22, 23 and 24 is supported from and suitably connected to structural members 25 and 27. Members 25 and 27 are carried by outer wall 28 of section 6 and walls 29 and 31 of channel 14.

A similar framework is provided over cross channel 20 of foundation section 7.

Structural members 32 are supported from wall 28 and wall 28' which extend at a right angle to channel 14 to enclose a side of passage 17.

Concrete aprons 33 are provided which slope in the direction of the arrows towards the central trough 8, 14, 20 which slopes towards pit 18. That is, the drainage is so arranged that surface liquids pass into drain troughs 14 and 20 and these drain troughs and channel 8 slope inwardly toward pit 18, discharging into said pit. On reference to Figure 4, it will be seen that cross channels composed of the three sections described slant toward the right so that liquid will drain therefrom into the bottom of pit 18 and to sewer or drain pipe 19. By this arrangement of surface drainage no accumulation of water or washing fluid occurs since all extra fluid is at once drained away from the washing station.

The pits in which the operating mechanism and the pipes are positioned may be covered when in use by plates 34, which rest on members 25, 21 and 32 and are formed to accommodate the mechanism to be described. The washing station is neat in appearance with no open pits or holes, nor any accumulations of water or oil.

Planks 35 suitably supported fit over track section I and cover cross pit 8. A slot is provided in plank covering 35 extending from rail to rail of the track to accommodate the spray nozzles to be described which wash beneath the engine. The plank covering slopes toward the slot both longitudinally and laterally to provide for drainage.

Rotatably journaled between and steadied by channel member 21 and 22 are vertical pipes 37 and 38 which support the main vertical standards about to be described in detail. Suitable swiveling water-tight joints or connections 39 provided with an upper rotatable pipe connection for pipes 37 or 38 and a lower stationary pipe connection 40 are suitably secured on pedestals 41.

The vertical pipe sections 37 and 38 project upwardly from their respective pits and have secured thereto horizontal pipe sections 42 and 43 respectively (Figure 5). Horizontal pipe sections 42 and 43 are secured to the upper surface of carriages or tables 44 which are secured at one corner to the vertical pipes 37 and 38 and are provided with supporting anti-friction rollers 45.

The carriage 44 is not shown in Fig. 1. At their inner ends, horizontal pipe sections 42 and 43 are provided with quadruply branched connections 46 (Figures 1, 4 and 5) into which are connected horizontal sections 47 positioned at right angles to horizontal sections 42 and 43. Horizontal pipe sections 47 are connected to and communicate with centrally positioned main vertical pipe member 48. The outer ends of horizontal pipe sections 47 are connected to shorter vertical pipe sections 49 which parallel main vertical section 48. At their upper ends the main vertical sections 48 are connected to upwardly and inwardly curved pipe sections 50 which may be of smaller diameter than the main pipe section 48. The main vertical standard comprising pipes 48 and 49, it is to be understood, will be shaped to most effectively conform to the average contour of the vehicle to be treated. The pipes 49 may be joined near their upper ends by a brace 49', as shown in Fig. 1.

The main vertical pipe sections 48, upper sections 50 and the shorter vertical pipe sections 49 are all provide with a series of threaded openings for the reception of nipples 51 to the ends of which are removably secured nozzle members 52.

6A The nozzle members 52, which are a part of the invention herein disclosed, are shown in detail in Figures 11, 12 and 13, and are arranged in a novel manner which will be fully disclosed herein.

Guy rods or guy wires 53 are secured at one end to a bracket 54 on the main vertical pipe section 48, said guy rods being secured at spaced points to the table members 44 to brace the upright pipes. For the sake of clarity the guy rods have been omitted in Fig. 1.

When soft coal is used as fuel, the locomotives become covered with a tarry, gummy deposit, and to the end that this may be removed effectively and without damage to the painted 76 surface, I have provided the novel arrangement to be described wherein an auxiliary cleansing stream of a deposit removing solution is directed on the locomotive, preferably in connection with and just before the locomotive is washed automatically. The auxiliary vertical pipe 55 is suitably supported from table members 44, for example by bars 56 (see Fig. 8) secured thereto in any desired and convenient manner as by bolts or by riveting. Vertical auxiliary pipe 55 is steadied by braces 57 which embrace main vertical pipe 48 and auxiliary pipe 55 at their ends. The ends of each brace 57 fit firmly on pipes 48 and 55, but permit rotation of the pipes to adjust the direction of the streams from the several nozzles. Nozzle members 58 are provided at intervals along the length of auxiliary pipe 55. The apertures of nozzles 58 are formed so that each directs a dispersing stream a substantial distance along track section I I as measured from the center of transverse foundation section 8. The distance to which these streams are to be projected from nozzle members 58 will vary in accordance with the circumstances of each installation, but I have discovered that with the locomotives moving at a speed best suited for passage through the filmlike streams produced by nozzle members 52, that the streams from auxiliary nozzle members 58 should be projected forwardly to strike the surface of the locomotive at a distance of from five to ten feet from the center of main vertical pipe section 48.

The locomotive upon approaching the washing station will first be showered by the streams from auxiliary nozzles 58 after which a short time will elapse before a given part of the surface wet by nozzles 58 encounters the streams of washing fluid from main nozzles 52.

A deposit removing liquid may be conveniently supplied to auxiliary nozzle pipe 55 by means of a flexible hose or other suitable connection which will not interfere with the rotation of main standards 37 and 38. I have shown on the drawings, by way of example, a flexible tubing or hose 59 which may extend along and be supported by brackets 56 and table member 44 for supplying auxiliary pipe 55. The tubing or hose extends through an aperture in plate 34 suitably positioned to receive the flexible tube so that it may yield as the nozzle standards move. A tube 59 for each pipe 55 may be connected to fittings 60 on pipe 61. The supply of fluid to nozzle pipe 55 is controlled by a valve 62 located to suit the convenience of the operator.

During regular washing operations, valve 62 is maintained closed so that the locomotive is cleansed by the streams from main nozzle members 52 alone. When the locomotive to be cleaned is covered with deposits of foreign matter resulting from fuel combustion or the deposits caused by the combustion of soft coal, the cleaning solution is introduced through valve 62 into pipe 61 as main pipe sections 48 approach washing position. The locomotive as it approaches the washing station to advance slowly therethrough first encounters the dispersing streams from nozzle members 58 which flow over the locomotive and penetrate and loosen the deposit. As the locomotive progresses, successive sections thereof encounter the film or sheet-like sprays of main nozzles 52 which remove the loose deposit and thoroughly clean the locomotive.

A solution of caustic soda is preferably sprayed from nozzles 58 and because of the short time which the caustic solution is permitted to remain on the locomotive, it may be a relatively concentrated solution.

The treatment by the solution from nozzle members 58 is effective but relatively mild because of the short time that the solution is permitted to remain upon the surface. The effect of the treatment is to retard formation of fresh accumulations of matter caused by fuel combustion.

The main standards of the washing station are supplied with washing liquid from the valve arrangement illustrated in detail in Figure 3 or 6 by means of the following connections. The stationary lower portions of the swiveling joints 39 are connected to pipes 63 and 64 which, as seen from Figures 3, 4 and 5, extend across the washing station through the cross pit 8. Pipes 63 and 64 are connected to a T coupling 65, one branch of which is connected to a supply pipe 66 which extends to the control pit 67 and is there connected in the case of a single washer to the valve arrangement illustrated on Figures 3 and 4 which will be described in detail.

An upwardly extending pipe provided with a valve 68 is connected in any suitable manner to supply conduit 66, for example, by connection to a branch of fitting 65 and carries cross pipe 69 stopped at both ends with which it communicates. Cross pipe 69 is provided with spray nozzles 52 arranged in staggered relation as shown in Figs. 5 and 5a for thoroughly cleansing the underpart of the vehicle.

Main supply pipe 70 (Fig. 2), receives hot water from a water heater 71 which may be of any desired type. In the preferred embodiment of my invention, water heater 71 is of the heat exchange type, the water being heated by steam which enters the heater through live steam conduit 72. A temperature regulator 73 is interposed in steam conduit 72 for controlling admission of heating steam into heater 71 to maintain the temperature desired. Temperature regulator 73 may be of the well known pressure operated Sylphon type. Thermostatic element 74, 43 which may be of the expansible fluid type, extends within heater 71 and is connected to regulator valve 73 so that steam will be admitted to conduit 72 in accordance with the temperature existing in heater 71.

60 Water is pumped to heater 71 through conduit 76 by means of a centrifugal pump 78 driven by motor 79. Conduit 76 may communicate with a reservoir or any suitable source of water supply. In the event that the washing fluid collected in foundation 4 is to be recirculated, conduit 76 will be connected to receive the fluid collected in the foundation.

Heated water flows from the heater under pressure through outlet conduit 77 to supply pipe 66. Reference character 81 represents a motor starter, the controlling coil 82 of which is connected by conductors 83 and 84 to one conductor of supply main 87 and the contacts of a control relay 89, which relay is controlled by movement of a vehicle on track section II as indicated by Figures 9 and 10. Valves 91 are connected in conduit 76 on each side of pump 78 for the purpose of controlling the flow of liquid through the pump.

10 Where a system of washers in accordance with one phase of my invention is to be installed, comprising a plurality of washers serving adjacent tracks, the supply pipe 66 of the associated washers extends to a common control pit 67, 15 supplied by a common supply pipe 70 as illustrated in detail by Figures 6 and 7 of the accompanying drawings. The valve arrangement for the system of washers will be fully disclosed as the description proceeds.

As thus far described, it will be apparent that a the nozzles 52 provided on the upright pipes 48 and 49 will be supplied with a cleansing fluid from the connecting pipes including the cross pipes 63, 64, the T coupling 65, and the supply pipe 66. The upright pipes 48 and 49 are rotatably mounted about their respective swivel joints 39 for movement into and out of operative washing position by mechanism to be hereinafter described.

In Figure 1 the pipe sections are shown positioned in their washing position whereby sprays emitted from the nozzle members 52 will completely envelop and wash a locomotive or other piece of railway rolling stock positioned on the tracks 11. When the washing is completed the pipe sections may be swung 900 away from the track automatically or under manual control to a non-washing position where they will not endanger employees or interfere with passing equipment. From the description given as to the slope of the washing surfaces it will be apparent that any excess washing fluid will be drained into the drain trough composed of the connecting cross channels to the drain pit 18 from which it may be removed for treatment and recirculation or be passed out of waste pipe 19 to the sewer.

Flow of washing fluid through supply pipe 66 is controlled by a fluid pressure operated valve designated generally by reference character 94 under control of the pilot valve 95 which is contiolled by relay 89 upon passage of a vehicle in the manner described. A hand controlled valve 92 is positioned in this line to permit stoppage of the flow at any time so that the washer may be taken out of commission when maintenance work is to be done or if it is to remain idle for a time.

Fluid pressure operated valve 94 may be of the type in which the valve stem is operated by a diaphragm moved in response to fluid pressure.

The pilot valve 95 is preferably of the type in which a valve operating solenoid operates a three way valve automatically, accordingly as it is energized or de-energized and may be of the type disclosed in my Patent No. 1,931,444, granted October 17, 1933.

Pressure operated valve 97 is provided to drain supply pipe 66 after passage of the vehicle through the washing station. Valve 97 may be of the same type as valve 94, the diaphragm chamber of which is connected by a conduit arrangement to pilot valve 95 in a manner to be hereinafter fully described in connection with the automatic operation of the washing station. In order to thoroughly cleanse a vehicle such as a locomotive which is covered with a coating of dust, grease, dirt and foreign matter such as ashes and soot resulting from combustion of fuel it is desirable that a cleansing oil and preferably g6 my improved solvent disclosed in my Patent No. 2,057,388 referred to herein be incorporated and mixed with the hot water for spraying upon the vehicle.

A preferred arrangement for supplying solvent or oil is illustrated diagrammatically in Figure 2 of the drawings. Fluid tank 98 is provided which holds a supply of oil or other cleansing material which is to be added to the water in supply pipe 66. Tank 98 is provided with a filling connection controlled by valve 99 through which the oil or cleansing material may be introduced into tank 98. A vent connection is also provided for tank 98 controlled by valve 101. The fall of pressure across valve 94 is utilized to feed the contents of tank 98 to supply pipe 66 in desired quantities.

To this end a conduit 102 connects main supply pipe 70 with tank 98. A check valve 103 in conduit 102 prevents back flow of the contents of tank 98 into main supply pipe 10 under .abnormal conditions of operation. A drain pipe 104 equipped with valve 105 is provided for draining tank 98 or conduit 102 when desired. Valves 106 and 107 on each side of the connection of drain pipe 104 to conduit 102 permit draining of tank 98 or conduit 102.

Conduit 109 is connected to the top of tank 98 and to supply pipe 66 for the purpose of feeding the contents of tank 98 into supply pipe 66 beyond the fluid pressure control valve 94. A hand operated valve 11 and an automatically operated fluid pressure valve 112 are interposed in conduit 109. Fluid pressure operated valve 112 is under the .control of pilot valve 95 which is in turn controlled by relay 89 upon passing of a vehicle in a manner to be described.

Gauge glass 114 on tank 98 indicates the level of fluid in the tank and is used when filling the tank to determine when a sufficient quantity of oil has been introduced to fill the tank.

The procedure followed to initially fill tank 98 with the oil or other desired cleansing fluid is to close valves 107 and III and open valves 99 and 101. The cleansing material is admitted through valve 99 until the fluid rises to the top of gauge glass 114. When the level of the fluid is at the top of glass 114, valves 99 and 101 are closed.

To cause the cleansing fluid to be admitted to. supply conduit 66 valve 105 is closed and valves 106, 107 and valve III are opened.

The pressure in conduit 102 will exceed that in conduit 109 by an amount sufficient to cause the contents of tank 98 to be introduced in desired amounts into conduit 66. The quantity of oil or solvent to be added will vary in accordance with the particular cleaning job at hand. In practice, excellent results are secured when approximately one pint of solvent is fed into each one hundred and fifty gallons of water.

As thus far described, it will be clear that with hand operated valves 92 and 11I open, the opening of the pressure operated valves 112 and 94 will allow flow of hot water and solvent or oil to the spraying pipes and said mixture will be ejected through the nozzle members 52 on the main washing standards in a manner to be fully described in connection with the operation of the complete washer. The solvent or oil enters the hot water lines at a point remote from the nozzle members 52 so that the oil is picked up and thoroughly mixed with the hot water, prior to the ejection of the washing fluid from the nozzles.

By this construction the solvent or oil is equally distributed throughout the mass of water prior to the ejection from the nozzles.

Figures 11, 12 and 13 illustrate in detail nozzle 52 which projects the cleansing liquid in a thin unbroken sheet or film which I have discovered to be most effective for cleansing a vehicle in connection with the apparatus disclosed herein.

Referring in detail to these figures, each nozzle will be seen to comprise a body portion 115 and a mouth piece 116, a threaded shank 117 of the latter being engaged with threads on the interior of body portion 115. Threaded bore 118 slightly smaller in diameter than shank .11 provides for connection of the nozzle members to nipples 51 on the washing standards. The nozzle members 52 are preferably connected to nipples 51 by application of sufficient force to permit them to be turned by hand so that the plane in which the film-like spray is ejected may be altered readily at any time.

The face of mouth piece 116 from which the stream issues is formed with a conical depression 119, the sides of which are truncated and end at elliptical orifice 120, which opens into the flat end of shank 11. The inner flat end of shank 11 is provided with an elongated slot or recess 121, the center of which coincides with the center of elliptical orifice 120. The sides of slot 121 are concave and converge to intersect on a line which is substantially an arc of a circle curving inwardly from the ends of slot 121. Slot 121 is widest where its center coincides with the center of elliptical orifice 120 and tapers in both directions toward the circumference of shank 117.

The edges of orifice 120, where they intersect the plane of the inner end of shank I 7, are curved. Liquid under pressure entering nozzle member 52 merges through orifice 120 and is projected from the conical depression 119 in the form of an unbroken film of liquid lying in a plane substantially ninety degrees from the major axis of orifice 120. Orifice 120, slot 121 and conical depression 119, when bearing the relative proportions illustrated, project a stream which is of the thickness of heavy paper or thin cardboard.

Nipples 51 are provided on pipe sections 48, 50, and 69 in staggered relationship so that nozzle members 52 which are connected to the nipples 51 may project non-interfering streams' which reach the surfaces to be cleansed without interference. As illustrated on Figure 1, the films of liquid lie in parallel planes. The streams from the nozzles lying along one line, overlap the streams from those which are located along a parallel line which is spaced slightly from the first so that the surface is thoroughly cleansed. Nozzle members 52 on auxiliary pipe sections 49 are likewise mounted in staggered relationship.

Auxiliary nozzles 52 aid in thoroughly cleansing the pilot, the wheels, and their connected driving rods and the cylinder jackets and valve linkage. As previously described nozzle members 52 are preferably applied with only sufficient force so that they may be individually adjusted by hand to permit of procuring the best distribution of the streams which emerge from nozzle members 52 on the vertical pipes of the washing standards.

Each of the pipe sections 48, 49 and 50 by reason of their connections by screw-threaded fittings may be rotated so that the streams from nozzle members 52 may lie parallel to the center line of the cross channels or may be turned so that they will be directed toward or away from the direction of approach of the vehicle to be washed.

The preferred arrangement is such that nozzles 52 direct their streams toward the direction from which the vehicle approaches to be washed, so that the accumulated dirt and foreign matter will be pushed ahead of the cleansing stream and be flushed away by the flowing action of the liquid as it runs down over the vehicle. The streams from the nozzle members on auxiliary pipes 49 may be directed by turning these pipes so that the streams therefrom lie in diverging planes. The streams from the nozzle members on one auxiliary pipe 49 on each standard are directed toward the approaching vehicle, and streams from the remaining auxiliary pipes are directed toward the receding portions of the vehicle. With this arrangement of the nozzles S on auxiliary pipes 49, nozzles 52 on the lower end of the main pipe 48 are preferably arranged to project streams of liquid at right angles to track II.

The vertical pipes 37 and 38 have been described as being rotatably supported for rotation about the stationary portions of the joints 39.

Pipe 37 has securely fixed thereto a bell crank 123 (Figure 3) positioned within channel 14. A single lever crank 124 is securely fixed to pipe 38. The arms 125 of bell crank 123 and crank 124 are connected by a reach rod 126 passing through cross pit or trough 8. An operating rod 121 is connected at one end to bell crank arm 123 and at its other end to a crank arm 128 which St is connected to the rotary shaft 129 (Figure 3) driven by electric motor 130. It will thus be seen that rotation of the motor driven shaft 129 will impart rotation to the upright pipes 37 and 38 by way of the connections just described, ro2S tating nozzle-equipped pipes 48, 49 and 55 about the axes defined by the pipes 37 and 38. Electric motor 130 is adapted to be automatically energized to move the nozzle-equipped pipes to and from their operative washing position shown in Figure 1, to a position entirely clear of the tracks.

The mechanism now to be described in detail is provided for energizing and deenergizing the motor 130 and for controlling the fluid supply automatically.

As indicated diagrammatically by Figures 9 and 10, track section II is isolated from the tracks leading to the washing station by electrical insulating sections 131 whereby an insulated track section is provided. The preferred electrical connections for initiating and discontinuing operation of the several elements of the washers are illustrated on Figure 9 of the drawings. A modification of this arrangement is shown on Figure 10 of the drawings, which is somewhat like that disclosed in my Patent No. 2,057,388, referred to herein, but differs in several important details, some of which are common to Figure 9.

In the specific embodiments of the electrical connections illustrated, I have chosen to disclose control arrangements adapted for use on alternating current. However, it will be understood that direct current may be used for the current supply with appropriate changes in the circuits described.

A housing 132 is shown (Figure 1) which may be positioned over pit 16 and preferably encloses motor 130 and control panel 133 (Figure 9). The motor and electrical apparatus associated therewith are supported from control panel 133 and Ssheltered from the weather by housing 132.

The control relay 89 previously referred to is preferably positioned on panel 133 to minimize the amount of necessary control wiring which is .5 connected to control the several circuits in a manner about to be described. Relay 89 comprises an operating coil or winding 134 and movable contacts 136, 137, 138 and 139 carried by a bar 140 which is preferably of insulating material. Contact 137 normally engages fixed contact 141 when coil 134 is deenergized. Electrical energization of coil 134 moves bar 140 and the contacts thereon into electrical engagement with stationary contacts 142, 143 and 144 respectively.

6 A series of double pole switches which may be of any well known type are indicated by reference characters 145, 146, 147 and 148. Any of the well known toggle type snap switches may be used which are adapted for convenient mounting on a switchboard or panel. Switches 145, 146 and 148 are illustrated as of the double pole type, one set of contacts only being used. Switch 141 is connected as a double pole switch. A terminal block 149 is employed on panel 133 to facilitate installation of the necessary wiring. Incoming power supply conductors 87 which in the embodiments illustrates by Figures 9 and 10 receive energy from a conventional three phase alternating current system, are connected to the stationary contacts of a main switch 150 which is provided in the usual manner with fuses or any other suitable protective device.

It is to be understood that power supply conductors 87 could be connected to receive energy from any source of alternating or direct current, motor 130 being selected to operate from the available power supply. If the direct current is used energy will be transmitted to motor 130 from two supply conductors 87, with the interposed reversing connections to be described arranged to reverse the connections of either the armature or the field.

For the purpose of making clear the description which is to follow and to aid in tracing the circuits used, main conductors 87 are designated by reference characters 151, 152, and 153.

Motor 130 is supported from a ventilated housing 154 which is in turn carried by the supporting structure of housing 132, the latter sheltering motor 130 and housing 154. Motor housing 154 forms a support for panel 155 which carries motor reversing switches 156 and 157 respectively which are of the electromagetically operated type.

The terminal block 158 within housing 154 facilitates the connection of the necessary conductors between the apparatus on panel 133 and the apparatus on panel 155. Contactor 156 is provided with an operating coil 159 and fixed contacts 160 and 161. An armature moves in response to energization of coil 159 and brings movable contacts 162 and 163 into electrical engagement with fixed contacts 160 and 161.

Reversing contactor 157 is likewise provided with operating coil 164 and fixed contacts 165 and 166. An armature carries movable contacts 50 168 and 169 which are moved under the influence of operating coil 164 into electrical engagement with fixed contacts 165 and 166 respectively.

Fixed contacts 161 and 165 of contactors 156 and 157 respectively are joined by conductor 170. Fixed contacts 160 and 166 of contactors 156 and 157 respectively are joined by conductor 171.

Motor 130 is provided with leads 172 and 173 connected to the main supply conductors in a manner to be described. Conductor 170 is connected by wire 174 with main supply conductor 151. Conductor 171 is connected by wire 115 with main conductor 153 at switch 150.

Lead 172 of motor 130 is connected through solenoid brake mechanism 116 over the branch leading to contacts 162 and 168 of contactors 156 and 157.

One of the leads 173 of motor 130 is connected at switch 150 to main supply conductor 152. Lead 17 of motor 130 is connected to movable contacts 163 and 169 of contactors 156 and 157 respectively. Operating coil 159 of contactor 156 is connected by wire 179 through switch 146 to contact 131 on armature 140. Contact 137 is normally in electrical engagement with back 7g contact 141 of relay 89, which is in connection over wire 181 with switch 148. Switch 148 is connected to main supply conductor 152 through a branch of wire 183 which is connected to one pole of switch 147 and to the operating coil of pilot valve 95. The other pole of switch 147 is connected to wire 182 which with wire 183 completes the circuit to pilot valve 95 from mains 152 and 151. The remaining end of operating coil 159 is connected to stationary contact 186 of the limit switch which is designated generally by reference character 187.

Operating coil 164 of contactor 157 is connected by wire 188 with stationary contact 144 of relay ;5 89. Movable contact 139 with which it cooperates is connected by wire 189 to switch 148 which as previously described is connected by wires 182' and 183 with main supply conductor 152. The other end of operating coil 164 is connected to -0 contact 191 of limit switch 187.

Limit switch 187 comprises a sector 192 secured to shaft 193 which is rotated by motor 130. Fixed contacts 186 and 191 previously described are provided with contact prongs which cooperate .5s with movable contact 198. Movable contact 198 is moved by segment 192 from the position indicated on Figure 9 when the main washing standards reach their operative position.

Movable contact 198 is connected by conductor ;:0 200 to conductor IT1. Motor 130 drives operating shaft 129 (Figure 3) through the medium of suitable gearing (not shown) which drives shaft 193 of limit switch 187. It is to be understood that limit switch segment 792 may be :. mounted directly upon shaft 129, the previously described connections remaining precisely as described.

The parts illustrated by Figure 9 are in the position which they will assume when insulated track section II is unoccupied. As the locomotive or other piece of rolling stock approaches the washing station and insulated track section II, the rails of the track are bridged by the axles of the locomotive which closes a circuit including battery 202 through conductor 203, relay operating coil 134, wire 205 and conductor 204 to the other rail of track section II. Relay coil 134 is thus energized by current supplied by the battery 202. Battery 202 may be small, consisting of go a few cells of ordinary dry batteries supported conveniently from panel 133.

Energization of coil 134 of relay 89 moves armature 140 to open the connection between wires 179 and wires 181. At the same time fixed contacts 142, 143 and 144 are brought into electrical engagement with corresponding movable contacts 136, 138 and 139 of armature 140.

Coil 164 of contactor 157 is now energized over wire 188, contacts 144 and 139 of relay 89, wire 189, switch 148, wires 182' and 183 and supply conductor 152. The circuit of the coil is completed from supply conductor 153 over wire 115 and the cooperating contacts 198 and 197 of limit switch 187. Energization of coil 164 closes contacts 166 and 169 and contacts 165 and 168 of contactor 157. Motor 130 is now connected through motor leads 172, 173, and 177 to main supply conductors 87 over the following circuits.

Lead 172 is connected through the solenoid brake mechanism 176 over the branch leading to contacts 162 and 168 through contacts 168 and 165 of contactor 157, conductor 170 ard wire 174 to supply conductor 151. Motor lead 173 is connected directly at switch 150 to main supply conductor 152. Motor lead ITT is connected through contacts 165 and 166, conductor IT1, and wire 175 to main supply conductor 153. Motor 130, because of the connections to supply mains 87 just described, operates and imparts rotation to shaft 129 which swings crank arm 123 previously described to move the main washing standards to washing position. As these standards approach washing position, segment 192 of limit switch 187 rotates, and when the standards are substantially in their operative washing position, contact 198 is moved from its engagement with contact prong 197 into engagement with the contact prong of contact 186 interrupting the circuit including coil 157 which allows contacts 165 and 168, and contacts 169 and 166 to open stopping the motor.

Over-travel of the standards is prevented by solenoid brake 176 which may be of any well known type comprising a spring set brake released upon energization of coil 209, which is connected directly into motor lead 172. During the progression of the vehicle through the washing station, the rails of track section 1 I are continuously bridged by the wheels and axles thereof, maintaining the circuit previously described through operating coil 134 of relay 89, and holding contacts 137 and 141 thereof out of electrical engagement.

As the locomotive passes from the washing station the rails of track section 1 are no longer bridged whereupon coil 134 is deenergized permitting engagement of contact 137 and back contact 141 of relay 89. A circuit now completed includes coil 159 which is energized over a circuit, one branch of which includes wire 179, switch 146, contacts 137 and 141, wire 181 to switch 148, wires 182' and 183 to main supply conductor 152.

The other branch of this circuit includes limit switch contact 186, movable limit switch contact 198, which was positioned as the standards reached washing position, conductor 171 and wire 175 to main supply conductor 153. Lead 172 of motor 130 is now connected through contacts 160, 162, conductor 171 and wire 175 to main supply conductor 153. Lead 177 is connected to con- 43 tacts 163, 161, conductor 170 and wire 174 to main supply conductor 151. Lead 173 is maintained in communication with supply conductor 152. it' will be observed that with this connection of the motor leads to supply conductors 87 that the connections to two of these leads have been interchanged, whereby motor 130 is caused to rotate in reverse direction and move the standards from their operative positions. Limit switch sector 1921 moves limit switch contact 198 to the right as viewed on Figure 9 when the standards have been moved to their, idle position with pipe sections 42 and 43 substantially parallel to track section SI. Interruption of the circuits including the circuit of operating coil 159 at the limit switch contacts deenergizes contactor 156 and permits separation of contacts 160, 162 and contacts 161 and 163, stopping motor 130. The parts are then restored to the position illustrated on Figure 9 and are ready to repeat the cycle of operation upon the approach of the vehicle toward the washing station.

The switches designated by reference characters 145 to 148 provide for manually controlling the several automatic functions of the washer, independently of the track circuit control of reiqv 89 when this is desired.

Switch 145 is connected to bridge wires 203 and 204 so that in closed circuit conditions it completes the circuit including the battery 202 and operating coil 134 of relay 89, affording means of manually initiating operation of the washer so that the sequence of events described in connection with occupancy of track section 11 will be followed. Moving switch 145 to its open circuit position will interrupt the circuit including battery 202 and coil 134 provided track section II is unoccupied. Upon deenergization of coil 134 back contacts 137 and 141 are closed energizing operating coil 159 and contactor 156 in the manner previously described in connection with the passage of the vehicle beyond track section I , to restore the standards to their main operating position.

Manipulation of switch 146 to its open circuit position interrupts the connection to operating coil 159 of contactor 156 and serves to arrest or prevent movement of the washing standards towards their inoperative position away from track circuit I1.

Switch 147 disconnects the operating solenoid of pilot valve 95 from main supply lines 151 and 152 from which it derives its energization when contacts 138 and 143 of relay 89 are closed. With switch 147 in its open circuit position, pilot valve 95 remains closed and prevents washing fluid from reaching the main washing standard. With switch 147 in its open circuit position switch 145 may be operated to check the operation of circuit 0 controlling motor 130 and the mechanism which moves the main standards from their inoperative to their operative position.

Opening of switch 148 interrupts the circuits over wires 188 to 189 which includes operating coil 164 of motor operating contactor 157, and thus prevents movement of the washing standards toward their operative position by motor 130.

Switch 148 is also in series with switch 146, and serves to interrupt the circuit including coil 159 of motor operating contactor 156 to prevent movement of the washing standards to their inoperative position away from track section I.

Operation of the group of switches just described permits complete manual control of the 43 operation of the washing station when it is desired to interrupt the washing of locomotives at any time or to position the standards independently of the position of track circuit II. Switch 147 and contacts 138 and 143 of relay 89 must be closed to permit the flow of washing fluid to the washing standard and this feature prevents waste of washing fluid by manipulation of switch 147 so that the flow of washing fluid is stopped except when track section I is occupied or switch 53 145 is closed.

The modified circuit arrangement illustrated on Figure 10 of the drawings is similar to that used in my copending application S. No. 448,137, referred to hereinbefore and differs from Figure 9 ;Go in that a separate track relay is used, the operating coil of which is connected in a circuit including battery 202, lines 220 and 221 and insulated track section II. Track relay 223 illustrated diagrammatically in Figure 10, is provided with ~53 an armature 226 which moves into contact with fixed contact 227 when its operating coil 228 is energized from battery 202 by a locomotive or other vehicle bridging track circuit II and completing a circuit over wires 220 and 221. Oper7o ating coil 134 is connected to fixed contact 227 over wire 230. The electrical contacting portion of armature 226 is connected by wire 231 to main supply line 151. The remaining end of operating coil 134 of relay 89 is connected by wires 232 and 233 to switch 148. Switch 148 is connected by wire 183 to main supply line 152. Upon energization of track relay 223 operating coil 134 of relay 89 is energized by the connection just described tomain supply conductors 151 and 152. Contact 139 of relay 89 is connected to wire 233 which corresponds to wire 189 of Figure 9.

One contact of switch 145 is connected by wire 235, to wire 230. The remaining contact of switch 145 is connected to wire 231. It will thus be seen that when switch 145 is closed, contacts 226 and 227 are short circuited so that operating coil 134 may be energized when track section II is unoccupied. Stationary back contact 141 of relay 89 is connected by wire 237 to wire 183 which is in turn connected to main supply conductor 152. The remaining connections are the same as those illustrated in Figure 9, and the same reference numerals have been applied to designate connections which do not differ from those illustrated by Figure 9 and fully described in connection therewith. Switch 146 is connected in wire 179 so that manipulation of this switch to its open circuit position interrupts the connection to operating coil 159 of contactor 156 and serves to arrest or prevent movement of the washing standards toward their inoperative position.

Switch 147 may be used to interrupt the circuit of pilot valve 95 independently of the position of contacts 138 and 143 of relay 89 that was described in connection with Figure 9. Manipulation of switch 148 to its open position interrupts the circuit including operating coil 134 of relay 89 and also the circuit including the operating coil 164 of contactor 157. With this circuit arrangement coil 134 of relay 89 cannot be energized from switch 145 when switch 148 is in its open position, and therefore back contacts 141 and 137 cannot be separated when switch 146 is closed to energize the operating coil 159 of contactor 156. In the circuit arrangement, illustrated by Figure 9, when switch 148 is opened, the circuits of both contactor coils 159 and 164 are deenergized, but contacts 137 and 141 may be separated by manipulation of switch 145. It will thus be possible to arrest movement of the standards to an operative position by manipulation of switch 145 if wire 181 of Figure 9 were connected directly to wire 183 as done in Figure 10.

From the detailed description of the operation of the switches and circuits given in connection with Figure 9, the operation of the modification illustrated by Figure 10 will be obvious. Figure 10, like Figure 9, illustrates the position of the circuit controlling elements when insulated track section II is unoccupied.

Switches 145 to 148 may be manipulated as previously described to effect manual control of the washing station.

In order that my washer may be fully automatic in its operation I have provided a novel automatic valve operating means to control flow of washing fluid to the main washing standards, illustrated in detail by Figures 3 and 4 and diagrammatically by Figure 2. Figures 6 and 7 illustrate a modification of the automatic valve arrangement of Figure 4 adapted for supplying fluid automatically to two washing stations on adjacent tracks.

Referring to Figures 2 and 4, it will be seen that valve chamber 260 of electrically operated pilot valve 95 is connected by conduit 262 so as to be supplied with fluid under pressure from pump 78. Conduit 262 is provided with hand valve 263 to prevent automatic operation of the washer when desired. Manually controlled switch 147, valve 263 and hand valve 92 may be used separately or together to control the flow of washing fluid manually.

Energization of the controlling solenoid of pilot valve 95 places conduit 262 in communication with conduit 264.

Conduit 264 is connected to branch 266 which is ir, communication with diaphragm chamber 268 of main supply valve 94 through conduit 269.

Branch 266 also communicates with diaphragm chamber 271 of fluid pressure operated drain valve 97, and is provided with a drain valve 273 beyond its connection with diaphragm chamber 271.

Branch 274 of conduit 264 communicates with diaphragm chamber 276 of fluid pressure operated valve 112, which controls the flow of solvent or oil from tank 98 to supply conduit 66. Branch 274 is also provided with a drain valve 278 beyond the point of connection with diaphragm chamber 276. Valves 273 and 278 provide for draining conduit 264 and its branches. Valves 96 and 112 are opened and drain valve 97 is closed when conduit 264 is supplied with fluid upon energization of the controlling solenoid of pilot valve 95. Electrically operated pilot valve 95 in its deenergized position places pressure conduit 264 in communication with drain pipe 280 80 which is connected to drain conduit 281. The diaphragms of valves 94, 97 and 112 are relieved of fluid pressure which permits valves 94 and 112 to close and valve 97 to open. A manually adjustable valve 283 which is preferably of the 85 needle type to permit fine adjustment is interposed in conduit 280 to control the rate of drain of the diaphragm chambers to control the rate of closing of valves 94 and 112 and the rate of opening of main drain valve 97 to prevent water hammer.

Control of the operation of the pressure operated valves by regulating the rate of flow of fluid under pressure into their respective diaphragm chambers prevents excessive pressures on the machine and the possibility of stalling the motors before the standards are in their operative position.

Pump 78 as previously described stops before the diaphragm chambers of the pressure operated 5o valves are relieved of fluid pressure. Adjustment of needle valve 283 may be such that upon deenergization of motor controller winding 82 and pilot valve 95 the escape of fluid from the diaphragm chambers is retarded to such an extent .1 that pump 78 has stopped and the pressure existing in conduit 70 is diminished before the diaphragms of the respective valves are relieved of fluid pressure which has been built up in conduit 264 upon energization of valve 95.

;no Valve 97 interposed in conduit 285 provides for drainage of the washing standards back through supply pipe 66 to drain conduit 281, when conduit 264 is relieved of fluid pressure on deenergization of pilot valve 95. Hand valve 286 may be closed ':, to prevent drainage of the standards when desired. Drain conduit 281 is closed by check valve 287 which prevents back flow of waste water and foreign matter into the system.

A thermally operated control valve 288 operates T to drain conduit 70 when the water is too cold.

Valve 288 is connected by conduit 290 to supply pipe 70 and to drain conduit 281. A thermostatic element which may be of the expansible fluid type projects within conduit 70 so as to be exposed to the temperature of the liquid therein and is connected by tube 293 to the operating chamber of valve 288. Valve 288 is preferably set to open at or below temperatures of one hundred degrees Fahrenheit.

Temperature controlled valve 288 and thermal element 291 may be of the type described in connection with regulator 73 and thermostatic bulb 74.

The automatic valve arrangement just described functions upon approach of a locomotive or other vehicle to supply water from pipe 70 and fluid from tank 98 to the main washing standards.

When a locomotive enters insulated track section II, contacts 138 and 143 are closed to energize the controlling solenoid of pilot valve 95 to place the diaphragm chambers of the pressure operated valves in communication with conduit 262. Contacts 136 and 142 are also closed which energizes the operating coil 82 of motor starter 81 over wires 83 and 84 which places pump 78 in operation. Automaticallly operated valve 94 and pressure operated valve 112 previously described open slowly as fluid under pressure is admitted to their diaphragm chambers. Drain valve 97 closes and in this condition of the automatic valve system, hot water from pipe 70 and oil or solvent from tank 98 is supplied to conduit 66 and the washing standards.

As the locomotive leaves insulated track section 11, cooperating contacts 136 and 142 and cooperating contacts 138 and 143 are opened in the manner previously described in connection with Figures 9 and 10. Motor starting switch 81 (Figure 2) opens and valve 95 operates to place the diaphragm chambers of the pressure operated valves in communication with drain pipe 281.

Valve 283 is preferably adjusted so that valves 94 and 112 are closed slowly and drain valve 97 likewise opens slowly as fluid is permitted to drain from the diaphragm chambers. Where the existing pressure of the water supply entering the pipe 76 is utilized, pump 78 may be dispensed with. The operation of the automatic valves follows the cycle previously described, valve 263 being set to admit fluid slowly 4d to the diaphragm chambers of the pressure operated valves.

The modification of the automatic valve arrangement shown in Figures 6 and 7, permits operation preferably in an alternate manner of 80 two locomotive washers located on adjacent tracks. Valve pit 67 of Figures 6 and 7 may be conveniently located between the foundations 4 of the washers with resulting economy of space in crowded yards. Referring to these figures in detail it will be seen that supply conduit 70 is connected to a suitable fitting 299, which communicates with conduits 301 and 302 which correspond to supply pipe 66 of Figures 2 and 4. Pressure operated 00 valves 303 and 304 are interposed in conduits 301 and 302 respectively. Conduit 310 communicates' with the valve chambers of electrically operated pilot valves 312 and 314 which are similar to pilot valve 95 previously described in connection with Figures 2 and 4. Valves 315 and 316 control the flow of fluid to the valve chambers of the pilot valves 312 and 314.

Control conduit 318 is connected to the valve chamber of pilot valve 312 and is placed in com- r0 munication with supply conduit 70 upon energization of the controlling solenoid of pilot valve 312 which occurs when the insulated track section of the left hand washer is occupied.

Conduit 318 communicates with the diaphragm T7 chamber of automatically controlled supply valve 303 and is connected through check valve 320 to the diaphragm chamber of automatic drain valve 97. Control conduit 321 which is connected to the valve chamber of pilot valve 314 also communicates with the diaphragm chamber of automatic drain valve 91 through check valve 322.

Branch conduit 323 leads from conduit 318 to the diaphragm chamber of pressure controlled valve 307 which controls supply of fluid from tank 98 to main supply conduit 301 through which the supply of washing fluid under pressure is conducted to the standards of the left hand washer.

A drain valve 378 is provided at the end of conduit 323 for the purpose of draining control conduit 318. Control conduit 321 is placed in communication with supply conduit 70 upon energization of the controlling solenoid of pilot valve 314, when the insulated track section of the right hand washer is occupied. Branch conduit 326 connects control conduit 321 with the diaphragm chamber of pressure controlled valve 308, which controls the supply of fluid from tank 98 to the right hand washer.

Drain valve 378' closes the open end of conduit 326. Conduit 321 is in communication with.the diaphragm chamber of automatically controlled supply valve 304 for the right hand washer.

Exhaust lines 328 and 329 of pilot valves 312 and 314 respectively are connected by pipe 331, in which is located valve 332, preferably of the needle type, to drain pipe 334 which discharges into a sewer or other waste water connection.

Supply conduit 301 for the left hand washer 53 is connected to automatically controlled drain valve 97 through conduit 336 in which is located check valve 338. Supply conduit 302 for the right hand washer is connected to automatic drain valve 97 through conduit 339 in which check valve 341 is located. Manually controlled valves 343 and 344 which correspond to valve 286 of Figures 3 and 4 provide for closing off communication between supply conduits 301 and 302 and the automatic drain valve.

4. Thermally controlled valve 288'under control of therniostatic bulb 291 drains supply conduit 70 in the manner fully described in connection with Figures 4 and 5.

Drain pipe 334 is provided with a check valve s5 346 to prevent backflow of waste water into the system.

In operation of the modified valve arrangement just described, entry of a vehicle upon the Insulated track sections of either the right hand or the left hand washing station will initiate operation of the pump 78, it being understood that in the preferred arrangement, duplicate control panels 133 are provided, one for each of the washers, with suitable connections from each panel o6 to coil 82 of motor starter 81.

If desired, one panel 133 may be provided having separate control circuits from each of the track sections II of the washers so as to provide independent operation of either of the pilot valves 312 or 314, depending on the track which is occupied. The arrangement utilizing one control panel is especially advantageous if the tracks are used only for washing purposes in which case the standards may remain stationary in their operaT7 tive position adjacent the track permitting omission of motors .130 and their control and supply circuits. In this latter instance, if the standards are to be moved automatically, separate control circuits for each of the motors 130 could be provided by utilizing two relays 89 on panel 133, Assuming occupancy of the track section II of the left hand washer, pilot valve 312 will be operated as fully described in connection with the embodiment of Figures 4 and 5, placing conduit 318 in communication with conduit 310 to operate valves 303 and 307 to their open position and close drain valve 97. Check valve 322 closes when fluid under pressure is present in conduit 318 to prevent flow of fluid from conduit 318 to conduit 321. When the insulated track section of the right hand washing station is occupied, conduit 310 is placed in communication with conduit 321 upon operation of pilot valve 314. Valves 308 and 304 are opened, and automatic drain valve 97 is closed. Check valve 320 is closed, preventing escape of fluid from conduit 321 to conduit 318.

When a washing operation has been completed on the track section of the left hand station, pilot valve 312 places conduit 318 in communication with conduit 328. Fluid escapes from the valve chambers of valves 303 and 307 and 97, the rate of drain being controlled by needle valve 332.

When washing operations are completed at the right hand washing station, pilot valve 314 places control conduit 321 in communication with conduit 329 and the drain which permits closing of valve 304 and 308 and the opening of automatic drain valve 97. Flow of fluid from the diaphragm chambers of the valves through pilot valve 314 is also under control of needle valve 332. Check valves 338 and 341 prevent draining of one of supply conduits 301 or 302 into the other.

Needle valve 332 regulates the rate of closing of the valves by controlling the rate of discharge from the diaphragm chambers. Valves 315 and 3 316 may be adjusted to control the rate of flow of fluid to the diaphragm chambers of the pressure control valves of each washer.

The complete operation of the locomotive washer of my invention including the automatic features thereof will now be described. As the vehicle to be washed approaches the washing station and bridges the rails of insulated track section 11, the sequence of operations described in connection with Figures 9 and 10 is initiated, depending upon the choice of circuit connections disclosed in these figures. Energization of motor starter 81 and pilot valve 95 causes pump 78 to operate and valves 94 and 112 to open and valve 97 to close in the manner fully described in connection with Figure 2.

Washing liquid in which desired proportions of oil or other cleansing material has been mixed from tank 98, issues from nozzles 52 on the main upright pipes 48 projecting the washing liquid on U the sides of the vehicle in unbroken films, as illustrated by Figure 1, which strike the surfaces of the vehicle with a gentle slicing action. As the films of washing liquid impinge on the surfaces to be cleansed, the liquid flows down over the surface with a flushing effect. The nozzles on the inwardly curved upward portions 50 of main pipes 48 project cleansing liquid on the top of the vehicle which reaches all of the crevices in and about the fittings. 05 The nozzles of auxiliary pipes 49 assist in removing grease and dirt from the wheels, main guide rods, guides and the guide yokes of a locomotive.

The nozzles on pipe 69 cleanse the parts beneath the locomotive in an efficient manner.

Each nozzle may be turned so that its film like spray lies in a plane that will most effectively reach all parts of the running gear lying beneath the locomotive. Modern locomotives in some instances are pro- uni vided with booster engines and a third driving wa cylinder located.between the main cylinders, the ca] driving piston of which is connected to a crank in in the axle of one of the pairs of drivers. This ve] added mechanism which is ordinarily inaccessible and can be cleaned over a pit by hand methods he only with great difficulty, is readily cleansed of pe dirt and foreign matter, which is drawn up from be the road bed, by the nozzles on pipe 69 so these pi] parts may be more readily inspected and defects sh detected, th As the vehicle passes from the washing station, motor 13S operates to bring the standards us to their inoperative positions and valves 94 and sp 112 are closed and drain valve 91 is opened as hi previously described in connection with the op- al eration of the automatic control arrangement n shown on Figures 2, 4, 9 and 10. The apparatus ar is then in its non-operative position and ready s for entrance of another rail vehicle on the in-- f sulated track section of the washing station. so If the locomotive to be cleansed is covered with lu deposits resulting from the combustion of soft N coal, valve 62 (Figure 3) is opened as the locomotive approaches the washing station permit- fi ting streams of the deposit removing solution to e be projected upon the approaching locomotive e before it reaches the stream. from the main r washing standards. The intervals between the s time that the sprays from the nozzles on auxiliary pipes 55 reach the locomotive and the time s that the streams from the main washing standards reach the locomotive, I have found is gen- a 1 erally sufficient to remove the major portion of the deposits of foreign matter and where the 1 deposit is especially heavy it softens the remainder so that it is readily removed by the streams from the main washing standards.

In the event that it is desired to have the deposit removing solution admitted to auxiliary pipes 55, automatically upon approach of a vehide, a fluid pressure operated valve similar to that indicated by reference character 12 may be connected in solution supply pipe I1 so that its diaphragm chamber will be supplied with fluid under pressure from conduit 264.

When desired at any time the deposit removing solution may be permitted to remain on the locomotive by opening manually controlled switch 141 (Figures 9 and 10) so as to prevent the flow of washing liquid to pipes ยง6 and 64 of the main washing standards. This operation will be especially useful where the accumulation is espe5.5 cially heavy.

5 concentrated solution may be applied and allowed to remain to condition the locomotive or other vehicle for refinishing and repainting.

The washing station just described may be installed so that automatic operation will be had on any section of track, although it is frequently used for train movements. When rolling stock is using the track for train and shifting movements, manually controlled switches 146 to 148 ;. will be kept in their open position. The washing standards in their inoperative position will not interfere in any way with the passage of trains and will not be dangerous to trainmen riding on the sides or tops of the cars. o0 Although my novel washing methods and apparatus described have been shown in connection with and described for use with rail vehicles, the invention is not limited thereto. The novel washing arrangement herein described employing the nozzles of my invention for projecting broken film like sprays are equally useful for shing automobiles, busses, motor coaches, rail rs, railway cars and similar vehicles, the washg station being changed to accommodate the icle to be washed. o In the embodiment of the invention disclosed rein, the vertical standards are designed escially for the cleansing of locomotives. It will obvious that the heights and shapes of these pes will be varied to wash different sizes and 1 apes of vehicles on the top, bottom and sides ereof.

In all of the various uses above suggested, the e of my new nozzles projecting novel film like rays which impinge on the surfaces of the ve- 16 cle in their unbroken form reach and cleanse I parts of the vehicle in the most efficient maner so that the dirt and deposits of foreign matter *e first subjected to the cleansing action of the )rays after which the surface is washed by the 2 owing action of the liquid. A polish is imparted lely by the spraying operation by using the soations of my invention described in my Patent o. 2,057,388.

The invention may be embodied in other speci- 2 c forms without departing from the spirit or ssential characteristics thereof. The present mbodiment is therefore to be considered in all espects as illustrative and not restrictive, the cope of the invention being indicated by the apended claims rather than by the foregoing decription, and all changes which come within the meaning and range of equivalency of the claims rre therefore intended to be embraced therein.

What is claimed and desired to be secured by Jnited States Letters Patent is: 1. An apparatus for washing locomotives or imilar vehicles comprising cleansing devices consisting solely of spraying means, said means comprising laterally spaced, vertically extending, noz- 4 zle-carrying, hollow standards arranged to permit passage of a vehicle therebetween, a plurality of discharge nozzles constructed to project fanshaped sprays and arranged at relatively closely spaced intervals along the length of each of said 4 standards to project a spray upon the top and sides of the vehicle, and a nozzle carrying conduit extending transversely of the vehicle located adjacent said laterTy spaced standards and lying beneath the vehicle as it passes therebetween, a plurality of discharge nozzles constructed to project fan-shaped sprays and arranged at relatively closely spaced intervals along the length of said conduit, and means to supply cleansing liquid to said standards and said conduit, said spraying means projecting a spray of cleansing liquid on the top, bottom and sides of the vehicle in a zone between two vertical planes located relatively closely together whereby all of the surfaces of the vehicle will be cleansed progressively by passing (o it through said zone, said discharge nozzles being located along the length of said standards and said conduit in staggered relationship to project non-interfering, over-lapping, fan-shaped sprays in substantially vertical planes.

2. An apparatus for washing locomotives or similar vehicles comprising cleansing devices consisting solely of spraying means, said means comprising a vertically-extending pipe adjacent the path of travel of a vehicle to be cleansed, a plurality of discharge nozzles on said pipe, each of said nozzles directing a fan-shaped film of liquid in a substantially vertical plane toward the vehicle, said nozzles being distributed in staggered relationship along the length of said pipe, whereby said sprays reach the surfaces of the vehic without interference.

3. An automatic apparatus for removing proc ucts of combustion and stains from locomotiv or similar vehicles and restoring their surfaces 1 a clean unstained condition solely by a sprayir operation during a passage of the vehicle throug a washing station comprising a plurality of sul stantially vertical pipes spaced from one anothe to define a passageway for a vehicle, a pluralit of nozzles on each pipe facing said passagewa' means for supplying washing liquid to said pipe; means for supporting said pipes for movement in to and away from operative washing position ad jacent said passageway, auxiliary pipes carried b said supporting means, a plurality of nozzles o0 said auxiliary pipes facing in the direction of ap proach of the vehicle to the washing station means for supplying a deposit removing liquid tb said auxiliary pipes, means for moving said sup porting means, and means dependent upon move ment of a vehicle through said passageway foi governing the operation of said supporting means 4. An automatic apparatus for the thorougl cleansing of a rail vehicle solely by spraying comprising spraying means located adjacent a track, a washing liquid supply conduit connected to said spraying means, a fluid pressure controlled valve positioned in said supply conduit for controlling the flow of washing fluid through said conduit, a cleansing solution supply conduit for supplying a cleansing solution to said spray means connected to said first mentioned supply conduit, a fluid pressure controlled valve positioned in said solution supply conduit, a normally open fluid pressure controlled drain valve positioned to drain said spray means and supply conduits, an electrically controlled valve for admitting fluid under pressure to the control means of said valves to prevent draining of the spray means and to allow flow of washing liquid and cleansing solution to said spraying means, and means whereby said electrically controlled valve is rendered responsive to movement of a vehicle on said track. 5. The invention as defined in claim 4 wherein said last-named means renders the electrically controlled valve responsive to further movement of the vehicle on said track for relieving the control means of said valves of fluid pressure to cut off flow of washing liquid and cleansing solution, and permit opening of said drain valve to drain said spray means and supply conduits.

6. The combination of claim 4 wherein said electrically controlled valve is provided with a restricted inlet and a restricted outlet, whereby the control means of said fluid pressure operated valves are gradually subjected to fluid pressure and gradually relieved of fluid pressure to retard the opening and closing movements thereof. 7. An automatic apparatus for thoroughly cleansing a rail vehicle solely by spraying, comprising spray means located adjacent the track and means to supply cleansing liquid thereto under pressure upon approach to and passage of 6. the vehicle through the spray means, said supply means comprising valve means and a pressure supply pump, means responsive to movement of a vehicle on said track to open said valve means and start said pump upon approach of a vehicle Sto said spray means, and to stop said pump and le close said valve means after said vehicle has entirely passed said spray means, means for reI- tarding the opening of said valve means, and es means for retarding the closing of said valve bo means.

g 8. A system of automatic washers for locomoh tives and similar vehicles, comprising a plurality Sof washing stations arranged at adjacent tracks, r a common main supply conduit, supply conduits y individual to each of said washing stations conV, nected to said main supply conduit, drain cons, duits for said supply conduits, automatically controlled valve means positioned in said individual Ssupply conduits, control means for each washing Y station responsive to movement of a vehicle on n its associated track for opening said valve means in its individual supply conduit to allow flow of L, washing fluid to said station upon occupancy of Sits track by a vehicle, an automatically controlled, - normally open drain valve positioned in said - drain conduits, means whereby said vehicle-rer sponsive control means closes said drain valve when either of said supply valve means is opened, said vehicle-responsive control means being responsive to further movement of the vehicle on said associated track to close said supply valve means to cut off the supply of cleansing fluid and open said automatic drain valve.

9. An automatic apparatus for removing products of combustion and stains from locomotives or similar vehicles and restoring their surfaces to a clean unstained condition solely by a spraying operation during a passage of the vehicle through a washing station comprising a plurality of substantially vertical pipes spaced from one another to define a passageway for a vehicle, a plurality of nozzles on each pipe facing said passageway means for supplying washing liquid to said pipes, means for supporting said pipes for movement into and away from operative washing position adjacent said passageway, auxiliary pipes carried by said supporting means, a plurality of nozzles on said auxiliary pipes facing in the direction of approach of the vehicle to the washing station, means for supplying a deposit removing liquid to said auxiliary pipes, and means for moving said supporting means.

10. An apparatus for washing locomotives or similar vehicles comprising cleansing devices consisting solely of spraying means, said means comprising laterally spaced, vertically extending, nozzle-carrying, hollow standards arranged to permit passage of a vehicle therebetween, a plurality of discharge nozzles constructed to project fanshaped sprays and arranged at relatively closely spaced intervals along the length of each of said standards to project a spray upon the top and sides of the vehicle, and means to supply cleansing liquid to said standards, said spraying means projecting a spray of liquid on the vehicle in a zone between two vertical planes located relatively closely together whereby the surfaces of the vehicle will be cleansed progressively by passing it through said zone, said discharge nozzles being located along the length of said standards in staggered relationship to project non-interfering, over-lapped, fan-shaped sprays in substantially vertical planes.

THOMAS A. MACKIN.