Title:
Valve seat insert
United States Patent 2219471


Abstract:
This invention relates principally to a construction of a valve seat insert for water faucets or other types of valves in which the insert is made of stainless steel or equivalent material cast in die casting metal during the procedure of die casting the faucet. One of the characteristics...



Inventors:
Davis, John M.
Application Number:
US27746539A
Publication Date:
10/29/1940
Filing Date:
06/05/1939
Assignee:
Davis, John M.
Primary Class:
Other Classes:
164/108, 164/333, 164/DIG.2, 251/359
International Classes:
F16K1/42
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Description:

This invention relates principally to a construction of a valve seat insert for water faucets or other types of valves in which the insert is made of stainless steel or equivalent material cast in die casting metal during the procedure of die casting the faucet.

One of the characteristics of my invention resides in forming a liner in which the stainless steel insert is first die cast into this liner and thus ij is held in a desired position, such insert being tubular with a radial annular flange, the flange becoming embedded in the die cast metal of the liner and thus leaving an exposed edge in the cylindrical center of the liner to form the seat for the valve plug. A further characteristic of the liner construction is forming this with a tubular branch by which the liner is supported by a brass or similar tube, then the liner assembly with the tube is die cast into the body metal of the faucet. By such construction using the brass tube which forms a support for the liner and thus of the valve seat insert, such liner and the insert is held rigid in the proper position of the die casting mold to be properly incorporated in the main body of metal forming the casting.

A further characteristic of the completed faucet includes the embedded brass tube with the liner having the insert, the liner being formed of the same metal as the body of the faucet, that is, the die cast metal, both the liner and the body fuse together in the subsequent die casting. The brass tube however does not fuse with the main body of the die cast metal but is so held in position that there is substantially no movement and the :5 expansion and contraction of the brass and the die cast metal being substantially equal, there is no mechanical separation. An advantage of providing the brass or similar tube as a support for the liner is that this construction permits a very 10 thin wall of the die cast metal to be cast around the tube as the brass tube practically gives the main portion of the necessary strength to the faucet. Therefore by this construction there is not only an economy in the die cast metal but a pleasing appearance can be produced in the finished article, this having the characteristics of slenderness for the arm of the faucet leading to the valve.

In the finished faucet the brass tube is drilled to form an outlet for water, the inlet being at the valve. The seat is finished on its edge and being of stainless steel and thus non-corrodable, the seat has an extraordinary long life. As the die cast metal and the brass tube also are non-corrodable with the usual water services, the faucet as a whole may be kept in service for a long period of time.

My invention is illustrated in connection with the accompanying drawing, in which: Fig. 1 is a plan taken in the direction of the arrow I of Pig. 2 of a double faucet with a swivel discharge pipe, a portion being partly broken away to illustrate the insert seat and adjacent portions.

Fig. 2 is a side elevation taken in the direction of the arrow 2 of Fig. 1 omitting the swivel discharge pipe and showing a portion in a vertical longitudinal section.

Fig. 3 is a vertical section through an insert liner valve seat and a die cast lining forming the mounting for such seat.

In the construction of my invention, one of the main purposes is to utilize valve seat inserts designated by the numeral 11, note Fig. 3, made of metal known as stainless steel or the equivalent. A characteristic of this seat is that it has a neck 12, an outwardly projecting diametrical flange 13.

The neck is cylindrical on the inside surface 14 and is illustrated as slightly tapered on its outside surface 15, there being a slightly rounded corner 16 at the outside junction of the lower surface of the flange 13 and the cylindrical inside surface 14. The neck terminates in an annular seat surface 17 which after the casting is completed, is given the desired tooling to provide the desired smooth surface.

In order to insert such stainless steel valve seat in a faucet, I die cast the seat in a liner 20 which is characterized as having a cylindrical wall 21 with the die cast metal on the base 22 extending to the line of the cylinder 14 and causing a filling at the slightly rounded corner 16. The flange is thus gripped by the base 22 and the wall structure 21. Such wall is cylindrical on its inside surface as indicated at 23. A spigot-like end 24 is die cast in the same operation forming the liner. This is provided with a cylindrical outside surface 25 terminating in a shoulder 26, there being a central and slightly tapered opening 27 extending from the end 28 to the cylindrical surface 23 of the wall 21. This forms the discharge for water after passing through the opening of the valve seat insert. In the die casting operation there are a plurality of recesses 29 formed in the base 22 by pins which retain the insert in proper position in the casting die while the liner of cast metal is cast around the insert to retain this in place.

In a single or double faucet construction I utilize a supporting tube assembly 35, note Figs. 1 and 2. This is preferably made of a straight 65 brass tube 36 having its end 37 fit over the cylindrical portion 25 of the spigot-like end piece of the insert assembly 20. For a double faucet, a liner such as 20 with the insert case therein is mounted on the opposite end of the tube 36.

There is merely a tight friction fit of the pipe and the surface 25, the shoulder 26 contacting the end of the pipe and providing a limit to the overlap of the pipe and the spigot-like structure. The next procedure is to die cast the covering and casing metal designated by the assembly numeral 40. The valve portions of the casting 41 embed the liner with the valve seat insert mounted therein, the liner being indicated in dotted lines in Figs. 1 and 2. This provides a chamber 42 in the lower portion of the valve to receive the water from the tubular intake boss 43 to which is attached the water supply pipe 44, the pipe being fitted in any suitable manner. The die casting also provides a covering metal 45 which embeds the brass tube 36 and this metal merges with the die cast metal 41 of the valve.

The covering and casing die metal 40 hence embeds the liner assembly 20 including the brass tube assembly 35 of which one end is fitted over the end 25 of the liner. Manifestly as the insert valve seat II is attached to the liner 20, this is thus retained in the desired position in the valve construction. In the particular type of double faucet illustrated there is a short vertical outlet tube 46 with perforations 47 for the flow of water. This is cylindrical on its inside surface. A hole or opening 48 is drilled through the brass tube 36 preferably of the same diameter as that of the inside of the vertical outlet tube 46.

The die cast faucet thus has provision for attachment and fitting of the valve plug assembly 50, this being connected to the valve portions 41 and to the outlet pipe assembly 51 which is swivelly mounted on the vertical outlet tube 46.

In this type of construction as is well known in die casting, the liner assembly 20 on all surfaces contacted by the second die cast metal becomes welded or fused therewith so that there is no exact separation line between the liner and the remaining portion of the die cast metal.

The result of this is that the stainless steel valve seat may be considered as an insert not merely in the liner element 20 but in the faucet construction including the remainder of the die cast metal. The brass tube however is not welded or fused to the die cast metal, however it is retained immovable therein and on account of the expansion and contraction of the brass tube and the die cast metal being substantially equal, there is no tendency to separate. The brass tube adds decidedly to the strength of the faucet allowing the cast portion 45 and the parts adjacent thereto to be quite thin, producing a slender appearance to such part of the faucet.

Various changes may be made in the details of the construction without departing from the spirit or scope of the invention as defined by the appended claims. I claim: 1. In a faucet a valve seat of a stainless steel type characterized by a neck with a seat on one end and an outward extending flange on the opposite end, a liner of die casting type of metal embedding a portion of said flange only and with a base supporting the flange, said liner having a peripheral wall with a first opening therethrough concentric with the neck and spaced from the neck and a spigot extending laterally from said 23 wall having an outer surface to fit inside a supporting tube and a second opening leading directly from one side of said first opening.

2. A faucet comprising a liner of die casting type of metal having a valve seat insert of stainless steel characterized by a neck with a seat at one end and an outwardly extending flange on the opposite end, a portion of the flange only being embedded in the metal of the liner, said liner having a base supporting the flange, a pe- 5N ripheral wall with a first opening therethrough concentric with said neck and spaced therefrom, a spigot extending laterally from said wall, the spigot having a second opening leading directly from one side of said first opening, a smooth 4;, surface on the outside of said spigot, a tube of a brass type having a slip fit on said surface and a covering body of the same type of die casting metal as the liner, embedding said tube and fused to the uncovered outside of said liner there be- 4r ing a third opening in the covering metal leading to the said first opening below the insert and base of the liner, said tube forming a core for part of said covering metal.

JOHN M. DAVIS. 5(