Title:
Fountain pen guard
United States Patent 2218543


Abstract:
This invention relates to improvements in guards for writing pens, but it is more particularly intended for use in conjunction with fountain pens. The facts that fountain pens regularly serve their intended purpose fairly well, and that some types can be bought very cheaply, have diverted the...



Inventors:
Mcpherson, Kenneth W.
Application Number:
US29045339A
Publication Date:
10/22/1940
Filing Date:
08/16/1939
Assignee:
Mcpherson, Kenneth W.
Primary Class:
Other Classes:
401/232
International Classes:
B43K5/18; E21B1/04
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Description:

This invention relates to improvements in guards for writing pens, but it is more particularly intended for use in conjunction with fountain pens. The facts that fountain pens regularly serve their intended purpose fairly well, and that some types can be bought very cheaply, have diverted the attention of the average user from a realization that this instrument of writing is still subject to improvement.

i0 Such faults as a failure to start promptly when touching the nib to the paper preliminarily to writing, the eventual changing of the shade of the ink when writing, the letting down of a drop or drops of ink when the supply runs low and i5 similar occurrences are so common that persons using fountain pens accept said faults as inherent to the normal operation. This, however, need not be true because it has, been found that the addition of a simple guard will keep the nib .z moist so that the pen will start promptly, will stabilize the flow of the ink so as to avoid shading in the writing, and will conserve the last drops of a nearly depleted supply so that writing can be continued until the pen runs dry and this .5 without letting down the last drops to make blots on the paper.

With this preamble in mind the objects of the invention are as follow: First, to provide a guard which is an improve3 ment on the guard disclosed in the copending application for a patent on a penguard filed by Kenneth W. McPherson, December 1, 1937, Serial No. 177,623, a particular purpose being to emphasize the use of the guard upon the feed-bar of a foun- tain pen and avoiding its attachment to the nib as is one of the characteristics of said application.

Second, to employ a guard in the foregoing manner for the accomplishment of more uniform writing by bringing the ink in a suitable, wet state nearer to the tip of the nib.

Third, to provide a fountain pen guard which is attachable solely to the feed-bar, said guard including a fairly expansive nether wall in covering relationship to most of the feed-bar but spaced therefrom to form both with the feed-bar and a part of the nib, a reservoir to insure easy starting in writing and an ink reserve in the event of the feed-bar otherwise being virtually dry.

Fourth, to provide a fountain pen guard which is knurled or roughened on the inside, particularly in the region of the tip of the feed-bar, for the purpose of accommodating the ink fluid and facilitating its flow.

Fifth, to provide a guard which is especially .5 adapted to the comparatively recent type of fountain pen feed bar of comb formation, the numerous incuttings of which make it desirable to safeguard against premature and excessive drying of the ink fluid.

Other objects and advantages will appear in s the following specification, reference being had to the accompanying drawing, in which: Figure 1 is a side elevation of a portion of a fountain pen, illustrating the addition of the improved guard. 1 Figure 2 is an inverted plan view mainly of the nib, particularly showing the attachment of the guard to the feed-bar.

Figure 3 is a plan view mainly of the point end of the fountain pen, the nib having been removed Ito to better illustrate the relationship of the guard to the feed-bar.

Figure 4 is, a central longitudinal section illustrating the guard in the same relationship to the feed-bar as shown in Fig. 1. Figure 5 is a side elevation similar to Fig. 1, but showing the guard extended for increasing the flow of ink.

Figure 6 is a perspective view of the guard.

Figure 7 is a cross section taken on the line 7-I7 of Fig. 1.

Figure 8 is a cross section taken on the line 8-8 of Fig. 1.

Figure 9 is a cross section taken on the line 9-9 of Fig. 1. Figure 10 is a plan view of the guard.

Figure 11 is a detail view of the feed-bar, particularly illustrating the roughened point.

The fountain pen I comprises any ordinary construction in that it has a barrel 2, a feed-bar 3 and a nib 4. The feed-bar is herein shown as of the more or less prevailing comb type. This term is derived from the ridged side construction 5 which is intended to distribute the ink to the lateral ridges of the nib.

Feeding of the ink to said nib is primarily accomplished by an ink channel 6 (Fig. 3) which extends longitudinally of the feed-bar on its top surface and all the way back to the end of the cylindrical stem i of which the feed-bar is a part, and which serves the additional purpose of wedging the nib in the ordinary bore 8 at the front of the barrel. While the comb type feedbar 3 facilitates the flow of ink in the manner stated, it carries with it the disadvantage of exposing much more of the ink than in fountain pens having other types of feed-bars that a drying of the ink is something that has to be taken into account.

Reference is now made to the guard 9 (Fig. 6), which constitutes the main improvement. This guard consists of a shell of thin material. The nature of the latter is subject to such a wide variation that a listing of all the kinds of material would be inexpedient, it being regarded as sufficient to state that it may comprise Celluloid, thin metal or any one of suitable plastic compositions. Moreover, the guard 9 is capable of being flinished in any one of the colors to match that of the barrel, or it may be made in imitation of gold so as to match the nib itself.

This guard possesses a degree of flexibility.

This quality would be inherent in virtually any material of which the guard is intended to be made. It has a fairly expansive nether wall 10 herein also referred to as a bottom. This nether wall is broader than the feed-bar 3 is wide (Figs. 2, 3 and 8) and desirably so in order to define ink channels II (Fig. 8) especially in the corners between the guard and the edges 12 of the feedbar.

The excess broadness of the bottom 10 when compared with the width of the feed-bar 3 comes about by reason of the pitched or slanting relationship of the flanges to the bottom 10. These flanges are directed inwardly of the guard when read in reference to the bottom, or are flared when read in reference to the feed-bar to which they are slidably but frictionally attached.

3o The sides 14 of the guard 9, as well as the flanges 13, are substantially parallel for a part of the distance of the guard as is well seen in Fig. 10. But at the places 15 (Fig. 10) where the guard approximately coincides with the shoulders 16 of Ithe nib 4 (Fig. 2) both the nether wall or bottom 10 and the flanges 13 converge to a blunt point i7. This point is rounded both from the plan aspect (Fig. 10) and in longitudinal section (Fig. 4). The result is the cup-shape 18 which o4 plays a large part in conserving the ink, especially the last drops of a nearly depleted supply.

Depressed places 19 are formed longitudinally of the feed-bar 3 (Figs. 8 and 9). These places can be identified as grooves, but they are quite shallow because there is no necessity of deepening them more than suggested in the drawing. The so-called grooves enable sliding the flanges 13 into position between the feed-bar 3 and the overhanging parts of the nib 4 (Fig. 8). However, .0 dependence is not put upon the nib for the holding of the guard because this is a function solely for the sides of the feed-bar and the flanges of the guard.

Said flanges are deeper between their edges and the places of mergence of the flanges with the nether wall I0 of the guard than the distance between the depressed places or grooves 19 and the nether side of the feed-bar 3. The result of this comparison is that when the guard is slipped tio into place its nether wall will stand off from the bottom of the feed-bar, defining an ink space 20 which comprises the reservoir of considerable ink. It is readily seen that the latter is immediately accessible to the point of the nib 4, serving ito keep the latter moist as long as the guard contains any ink at all.

The secretion of ink as well as its flow, is facilitated by coarsely roughening the interior of the cup-shape 18 as denoted at 21 (Figs. 4, 6, 7 and 10). This effect is intended to be augmented by similarly roughening the extremity of the feed-bar as at 22 (Figs. 4, 7 and 11). The principle is that the ink will enter the crevices of the roughening and flow therealong to the surfaces in the concavity of the nib, thus to reach the customary slit to much better advantage than if the roughened surfaces were left smooth, as is ,the custom. The bottom of the bar may be left smooth so that if the guard is lost temporarily the pen will still be usable. Adjustments of the guard are made by simply sliding it along the feed-bar. The previously mentioned inherent resilience of the guard is translated into an inward tension of the flanges 13 so that these exercise a sufficiently firm grip on the feed-bar in the depressed places 19 to insure the retention of the guard in whatever adjustment (within limits) it may be set at. To these ends the guard 9 has a finger-piece 23 on the bottom, adapted to be engaged by the fingers for producing the required sliding. A stop 24 on the feed-bar 3 limits the sliding in the inward direction (Fig. 4) and when the guard 9 assumes the position representative of that direction of sliding, its cup-shape 18 is nearest the extremity of the feed-bar. The supply of ink to the slit in the nib is then reduced and the result is light writing.

On the other hand, when the guard 9 is adjusted outwardly (Fig. 5) and the supply of ink brought nearer the writing tip, a more copious amount of ink is exposed to the nib slit, resulting in heavier writing because of the more abundant flow. The latter function is also aided by a slight difference in the pitching of the guard, and feedbar bottoms. For the purposes of this description the guard and feed-bar bottoms are distinguished by the lightly drawn extension lines 25, 28 (Fig. 4). It will be seen that these lines flare at the left, cross at 27 and again flare at the right. This makes it plain that there is a forwardly diverging relationship of the two bottoms. The ink space 20 thus becomes larger although very slightly so, as it approaches the cup-shape 18. This arrangement is valuable from the standpoint that the ink is intended to be supplied to the point of the nib whence it is used, and less quantities are secreted toward the inner end of the guard where the escape of the fluid is sought to be prevented.

A final consideration comprises the addition of a small air vent 28 at one side of the pen guard -5 (Fig. 1). This vent is optional and is capable of emplacement in the most desirable location and not necessarily exactly in the position shown.

Its purpose is to prevent air blocking, and its presence in the guard is 'another contribution 30 toward the unrestricted. yet controlled feeding of ink to the point of the nib.

I claim: 1. A fountain pen guard comprising a member to be fitted upon a feed-bar which has a super- ;5 imposed nib, said member having a nether wall to cover most of the exposed surface of said feedbar, said member including forwardly situated top edges adapted to meet the underside of the nib point to establish complete side closures contiguously to the points of the feed bar and nib, and including a cup-shaped terminal between said points to form with the nib an ink reservoir.

2. In a fountain pen, a feed-bar having depressed places in the lateral portions thereof contiguously to the nether side of a superimposed nib, and a guard covering most of the exposed surface of said feed-bar, said guard having inwardly directed portions set in said depressed places. 3. In a fountain pen, a feed-bar having depressed places extending longitudinally thereof contiguously to the nether side of a superimposed nib, and a guard covering most of the exposed surface of said feed-bar, said guard having inwardly directed flanges slidably but frictionally fitting said depressed places.

4. In a fountain pen, a feed-bar having grooves extending longitudinally of the lateral s sides thereof, and a guard covering most of the exposed surface of said feed-bar, said guard having inwardly directed flanges slidably but frictionally fitting said grooves, said guard including a pointed nether wall with the point of i0 which said flanges merge.

5. In a fountain pen, a feed-bar having grooves extending longitudinally of the lateral sides thereof, and a guard covering most of the exposed surface of said feed-bar, said guard having inwardly directed flanges slidably but frictionally fitting said grooves, said guard including a pointed nether wall with the point of which said flanges merge, said point defining a cupshaped projection when correlated to the adi) jacent extremity of the feed-bar, and said cupshaped projection being internally roughened to increase the secretion and flow of fluid ink.

6. In a fountain pen, a feed-bar having lateral grooves extending longitudinally thereof and having a roughening on its exposed extremity, and a guard carried by said feed-bar, said .guard having lateral, inwardly directed flanges slidably but frictionally fitted in said grooves, said guard including a nether wall from which said flanges extend, said flanges being in flaring relationship to the feed-bar and thus affording an expanse of nether wall broader than the feed-bar, said nether wall, and flanges converging to a blunt point adjacent to the free extremity of the feed-bar and defining a cup-shaped ink reservoir in respect thereto, said reservoir being internally roughened to match said extremity.

7. In a fountain pen, a feed-bar having lateral grooves extending longitudinally thereof, a pointed broad-bottomed guard carried by the feed-bar, said guard having lateral flanges which are deeper between their edges and their places of mergence with the guard than the distance between the grooves and nether side of the feedbar thus to space the guard bottom from the feed-bar and define an ink space.

8. In a fountain pen, a feed-bar having depressed places along the longitudinal sides, a guard having a bottom in confronting relationship to the bottom of the feed bar, and flanges included in the guard extending from the bottom and being in frictional engagement with the depressed places, said flanges supporting the bottom in spaced and in forwardly diverging relationship to the bottom of the feed-bar, thus to progressively increase the size of an ink space between the guard and feed-bar.

KENNETH W. McPHERSON.