Title:
Antipicking device
United States Patent 2217891


Abstract:
This invention relates to an antipicking device to be placed on the beak of a fowl, and it is an object of the invention to provide a device of this kind which, when applied, obstructs the Sfowl's vision straight ahead and thereby eliminating picking or cannibalism and other objectionable habits....



Inventors:
Clayton, Cridlebaugh John
Application Number:
US21925838A
Publication Date:
10/15/1940
Filing Date:
07/14/1938
Assignee:
Clayton, Cridlebaugh John
Primary Class:
International Classes:
A01K37/00
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Description:

This invention relates to an antipicking device to be placed on the beak of a fowl, and it is an object of the invention to provide a device of this kind which, when applied, obstructs the Sfowl's vision straight ahead and thereby eliminating picking or cannibalism and other objectionable habits.

It is also an object of the invention to provide an antipicking device so constructed as to be effectively maintained in applied position by a pin, together with means for effectively locking the pin in place.

The invention consists'in the details of construction and in the combination and arrangement of the several parts of my improved antipicking device whereby certain important advantages are attained and the device rendered simpler, less expensive and otherwise more convenient and advantageous for use, as will be hereinafter more fully set forth.

The novel features of my invention will hereinafter be definitely claimed.

In order that my invention may be the better understood, I will now proceed to describe the same with reference to the accompanying drawing, wherein: Figure 1 is a view in perspective of an antipicking device constructed in accordance with an embodiment of my invention and in applied position, the head of a fowl being diagrammatically indicated by broken lines; Figure 2 is a view in front elevation of the device as illustrated in Figure 1; Figure 3 is an end elevational view of the device as disclosed in Figure 1; Figure 4 is a view in rear elevation of the device as illustrated in Figure 1; Figure 5 is a view in perspective illustrating a modified form of antipicking device.

As disclosed in Figures 1 to 4 of the accompanying drawing, my improved device comprises two guards or wing members I which, as illustrated in Figure 1, are adapted to be arranged one on each side of the beak 2 of a fowl. These guards or wing members I are preferably constructed of relatively light thin metal such as aluminum. These guards or wing members I are connected together by a link 3 generally of an arcuate form which is adapted to engage over the beak 2. This link 3 is also disposed on an upward and forward incline with respect to the adjacent portions of the guards or wing members I and is also arranged at the lower portions of such guards or wing members.

65 The guards or wing members I are provided at their inner marginal portions with the rearwardly projecting. lugs 4 and 5. The lug 4 is provided with an opening 6. which aligns with an elongated opening 7 in the lug 5.

A fastening pin 8 is inserted through these. openings 6 and 7 and through the breather openings in the beak 2 of the fowl. As herein set forth, this pin 8 is of a cotter type except that one arm a of such pin is slightly longer than the second or overlying arm b. The outer or free end of the arm a is provided with an upstanding lug c which extends over the adjacent outer end of the arm b to facilitate the application of the pin 8 through the breather openings. The inner ends of these arms a and b are integrally con- 16 nected by the loop 9 so constructed and arranged as to cause the arms a and b to separate and particularly to cause said arms a and b to engage within the opposite end portions of the elongated opening 7 whereby the applied pin 8 is effectively held against rotation and also against endwise movement.

The central portions of the guards or wing members I are provided with the openings 10 of desired size and which are closed by the plates II of red glass or the like. Each of these plates 1 is maintained in applied position by the lugs 12.

It is well known that fowls have cannibalistic tendencies and are especially attracted by the red color of blood causing them to pick at any portion of the fowl where red blood may be visible. By using the red plates II the vision of the fowl is at all times red and, therefore, the fowl loses its attraction to such color.

In the embodiment of my invention as illustrated in Figure 5, the securing pin 14 is directed through the openings 15 and 16 provided in the opposite end portions of the connection link 17 associated with the guards or wing members 18.

The opening 15 is elongated for the same purpose as has been hereinbefore explained relative to the opening 7, the securing pin 14 being of a construction similar to that of the pin 8.

It is believed to be apparent from the accompanying drawing that the lugs 4 and 5 or the portions of the link 17 having the openings 15 and 16 are thin which gives very little bearing surface. The thin edge of the material surrounding each of the openings 6, 7, 15 or 16 wears very rapidly if there is only a slight play or free motion between the peripheral portion of the applied pin 8 or 14 and the edge defining the opening. The particular construction of the pin 8 or 14 together with the provision of the opening 7 or 15 eliminates this disadvantage. As j5 previously set forth, the pin 8 comprises the arms a and b which are-integrally connected by the loop 9. As is illustrated in Figure 4 of the drawing, these arms a and b are entirely separated from each other and converge from the loop toward the outer ends of said arms. The extremities of these converging arms a and b are in close proximity thus facilitating the insertion of the pin thru the several openings and particularly facilitate the insertion of the pin through the breather openings in the beak of the fowl.

The arms a and b immediately adjacent to the loop 9 have their outer edge portions spaced apart a distance in excess of the elongated openings 7 or 15 so that said end portions of the arms a and b will be placed under tension within the opening 7 or 15. The natural tendency of these arms a and b after being placed under tension to return to their initial spaced relation will result in the inner portions of the arms a and b tightly bearing against the ends of the openings 7 and 15 whereby is eliminated the liability of any free play of the applied pin 8. If desired, after the pin 8 has been applied the free end portions of the arms a and b may be manually spread and bent back to provide further means to prevent the pin 8 having endwise movement.

From the foregoing description it is thought to be obvious that a mask or guard constructed in accordance with my invention is particularly well adapted for use by reason of the convenience and facility with which it may be assembled and used, and it will also be obvious 'that my invention is susceptible of some change and modification without departing from the principles and spirit thereof and for this reason I do not wish to be understood as limiting myself to the precise arrangement and formation of the several parts herein shown in carrying out my invention in practice except as hereinafter claimed.

I claim: 1. A poultry antipicking device comprising connected wings of a light thin material adapted to be carried by the beak of a fowl with portions being positioned at opposite sides of the beak, said portions having openings, one of said openings being elongated; arid a fastening means comprising a split pin having two elongated arms, and a resilient loop connecting said arms at one end of the pin, said loop maintaining slightly divergent the portions of the arms immediately adjacent thereto with the arms converging to a point adjacent to their opposite ends, said pins being insertible through the openings with the loop adjacent to and outwardly of the elongated opening, the converging end portions of the arms of the pin providing a point which will readily pass through the openings of the device and the beak of the fowl, the converging portions of the arms of the pin immediately adjacent the loop contacting with the end edges of the elongated opening as the pin is passed through the openings of the device and the beak of the fowl and slightly compressing said convergent end portions of the arms, the resiliency of the loop and the compression of the arms causing the converging ends of the arms to have close contact with the ends of the elongated opening to hold the pin rigid in fastening position.

2. A poultry antipicking device comprising connected wings of a light thin material adapted to be carried by the beak of a fowl with portions being positioned at opposite sides of the beak, said portions having openings, one of said openings being elongated; and a fastening means comprising a split pin having two elongated arms, and a resilient loop connecting said arms at one end of the pin, said loop maintaining slightly divergent the portions of the arms immediately adjacent thereto with the arms converging to a point adjacent to their opposite ends, said pin being insertible through the openings with the loop adjacent to and outwardly of the elongated opening, the converging end portions of the arms of the pin providing a point which will readily pass, through the openings of the device and the beak of the fowl, the converging portions of the arms of the pin immediately adjacent the loop contacting with the end edges of the elongated opening as the pin is passed through the openings of the device and the beak of the fowl and slightly compressing said convergent end portions of the arms, the resiliency of the loop and the compression of the arms causing the converging ends of the arms to have close contact with the ends of the elongated opening to hold the pin rigid in fastening position, the arms of the pin being of a length to extend beyond the portion of the device having the second opening, the extended portions' of said arms providing further means upon spreading said extended portions of the arms to maintain the pin in place. JOHN CLAYTON CRIDLEBAUGH.