Title:
Reservoir desk stand
United States Patent 2215630


Abstract:
This invention relates to a reservoir desk stand and has special reference to a base having a receptacle communicating with a supply of writing fluid in the base, the receptacle receiving a pen nib extending from the end of a pen holder. More particularly, this invention relates to a reservoir...



Inventors:
Wright, Howard S.
Martin, Lynn P.
Application Number:
US25741939A
Publication Date:
09/24/1940
Filing Date:
02/20/1939
Assignee:
SHEAFFER W A PEN CO
Primary Class:
International Classes:
B43L25/02
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Description:

This invention relates to a reservoir desk stand and has special reference to a base having a receptacle communicating with a supply of writing fluid in the base, the receptacle receiving a pen nib extending from the end of a pen holder.

More particularly, this invention relates to a reservoir desk stand comprising a base having a receptacle for receiving the pen nib and feed bar extending from the end of a pen holder, and a reservoir in said base for writing fluid communicating through a restricted passage with the receptacle for controlling the height of fluid therein, there being a shoulder in the receptacle for seating the holder in a position such that the UI pen nib extending therefrom lies closely adjacent the inner wall of the receptacle and is immersed in the fluid with the feed bar being elevated above the normal fluid level.

The present invention has further particular reference to the provision of a reservoir desk stand comprising a base having a receptacle for receiving the pen .nib extending from the end of the pen holder and a reservoir for writing fluid communicating between the reservoir and the receptacle, the receptacle being secured to the base and movable thereon to various positions of angular adjustment with means providing communication in any angular position of the receptacle for the supply of writing fluid :30 from the reservoir to the pen nib.

It is one of the objects of this invention to provide a reservoir desk stand of the type above noted wherein the base may be comparatively shallow and substantially flat. The base is preferably hollow and is provided with a partition separating the hollow base into two compartments, one of which acts as a reservoir for the supply of writing fluid and the other as an expansion chamber into which the receptacle for receiving the pen nib extending from the pen holder is disposed. A restricted passage is provided in the partition so that the level of writing fluid in the expansion chamber is controlled and the height of fluid in the receptacle may be maintained at a desirable level irrespective of the height of the fluid level in the reservoir. The top surface of the bottom of the hollow base is shaped to drain the fluid to a point directly beneath the pen receptacle in order to be able to O5 use substantially the entire contents of the reservoir.

Desk stands employing fountain pens have been widely accepted by the purchasing public today, the desk stand by reason of its employing 1 a fountain pen not requiring necessarily a supply of writing fluid in connection therewith. For the most part, such fountain pen desk stands employ a substantially flat shallow base. Having been thus widely accepted it has been found desirable to pattern the present reservoir desk stands after the fountain pen desk stands both in appearance and in efficiency of function. In order to accomplish this end many problems have presented themselves which the present invention has solved.

A reservoir desk stand, the broad idea of which is old in the art, is desirable primarily because it contains a relatively great supply of writing fluid as compared to the ordinary fountain pen desk stand which ordinarily holds just the supply of 16 writing fluid contained in the fountain pen.

When the fountain pen is not inserted properly In the receptacle therefor, the writing fluid in the tiny passages of the feed mechanism dries out and difficulty is had in Initiating flow of writing fluid therein when starting to write. In the reservoir desk stand the nib of the so-called dip pen is always immersed in the writing fluid and the above objection is overcome, the pen being able to write immediately upon contacting the writing surface. Little, if any, difficulty is encountered in evaporation of writing fluid from the reservoir desk stand which is a serious problem in the fountain pen desk stand.

Heretofore in reservoir desk stands the supply of writing fluid to the ordinary dip pen has been such as to foul the end of the pen holder so that when withdrawing the pen holder from the receptacle the fingers are smeared with writing fluid from the surfaces about the end of the pen 85 holder. Further, in starting to write, surplus writing fluid clinging to the feed bar supporting the pen nib frequently drops off the end of the nib thus blotting the writing surface.

The present invention obviates the tendencies in the reservoir desk stand to supply a surplus of writing fluid to the pen nib and feed bar thereof, the pen nib being immersed preferably in only the film of fluid which wets the inner wall of the bore of the receptacle above the normal fluid level with the end of the feed bar being at all times elevated above the normal fluid level therein.

The pen receptacle extends into the compartment which we have hereinabove designated the expansion chamber, the receptacle being preferably opepn at both ends with the writing fluid level being maintained at a desired level in the lower open end of reduced cross section. The upper end of the receptacle, being of enlarged cross section, receives the pen holder, the end of which engages a shoulder so that the end of the pen nib is immersed in the writing fluid.

Since all pen nibs are provided with slits, after the nib is immersed in the fluid, the fluid is drawn by capillary attraction upwardly to the feed bar to fill the fissures and combs normally provided therein so that the pen may write for a substantial period of time without requiring refilling. The above means of capillary attraction is effected entirely by the insertion of the pen nib only into the fluid of the receptacle and differentiates materially from the ordinary use of a dip pen wherein the nib and feed bar are simultaneously immersed beneath the fluid level. In the present instance the feed bar and nib acquire a supply of writing fluid by capillary attraction whereas in the usual dip pen the pen nib and the reservoir acquire the writing fluid by being immersed therein.

In one form of the above invention the receptacle is shown as being of substantially spherical shape about its external periphery so that it may be secured to the base for universal movement to various positions of angular adjustment and yet in any angular position have a supply of writing fluid from the reservoir to the pen nib. In other words, it may be desirable to change the angular position of the receptacle so that the pen holder 80 may be directed to the normal writing position of any one seated about a conference table and yet in so changing the angular position of the receptacle, maintain the supply to the pen nib of writing fluid from the reservoir. The present $5 application has for another of its objects the accomplishment of the above function.

In the event the receptacle is fixed, and immovable, therefore, to various position of angular adjustment, it is desirable to provide a pen holder which may be adjusted to assume a substantially parallel relation with the reservoir desk stand when, for example, the desk stand is disposed in a drawer for safe keeping. It is desirable to prevent evaporation of the fluid from the reservoir through the receptacle which if the pen were removed therefrom would expose a portion of the writing fluid to the atmosphere. The pen holder is, therefore, pivoted intermediate its length so that at all times the pen holder may be employed as a closure to prevent evaporation and always be in condition for immediate use upon assuming its normal function on the top of a desk. The movable receptacle may be so constructed and arranged as to permit the pen holder to assume a substantially horizontal position with respect to the top of the base although it may be desirable to employ the pivoted holder likewise in this instance.

The holder for use in connection with the desk stand of the present invention is preferably hollow so as to relieve the same of a substantial amount of' weight which ordinarily may cramp the fingers in writing. It has been found desirable to vent the interior of the barrel of the holder so that any expansion of air therein due to the heat from the hand will not affect the flow of the fluid in the feed bar and pen nib. When the writing point end of the pen nib is inserted in the receptacle, it is filled by capillary attraction substantially to capacity and it is desirable, therefore, to prevent any tendency to augment the normal flow of ink onto the writing surface which might normally occur were the pen holder not properly insulated.

76 It is well known, of course, that heat from the to discharge writing fluid from the fissures and combs of the feed bar abnormally. In the venting of the barrel of the holder an expansion of 5 air in the hollow thereof will, of course, take the course of least resistance which is the open vent in the handle rather than force fluids from the channels and fissures of the feed.

One of the objects of this invention is to pro- 10 vide a reservoir desk stand of the type indicated above having a substantially shallow and comparatively flat top base in keeping with the present commercially exploited fountain pen desk stands both in appearance and in efficiency of function.

Another object of this invention is to provide a reservoir desk stand of the hereinabove mentioned type in which the pen nib and feed bar are supplied with writing fluid from the fluid of the receptacle by capillary attraction.

It is also an object of this invention to provide a reservoir desk stand of the above noted type wherein the receptacle is secured to the base for universal movement to various positions of angular adjustment in which the supply of writing fluid from the reservoir to the pen nib is maintained in any angular position of the receptacle.

It is also an object of this invention to provide a reservoir desk stand of the above noted type in which, in storage or in use, the receptacle thereof may be sealed from the atmosphere at all times in the provision of a pivoted pen holder, the pen nib being always in a condition for use immediately upon initiating writing action. 38Again it is an object of this invention to provide a reservoir desk stand of the character above noted in which the pen holder thereof is vented to prevent expansion of air from the hollow barrel thereof being directed to the feed mechanism and 46 in this manner not to interfere with the normal flow of writing fluid from the feed bar and nib of the holder.

It is a still further object of this invention to provide in a reservoir desk stand of the above indicated character a means for wiping the surface of the pen nib in the event any accumulation of writing fluid may occur thereon.

Other objects and advantages of this invention will hereinafter be more particularly pointed out and for a more complete understanding of the characteristic features of this invention, reference may now be had to the following description when taken together with the accompanying drawings, in which latter: Figure 1 is a plan elevational view of a reservoir desk stand incorporating the features of this invention; Fig. 2 is a sectional view taken on the line 2--2 of Fig. 1, the pen holder being shown in elevation in association with the desk stand and having the writing point end thereof inserted in the receptacle; Fig. 3 is an enlarged fragmentary sectional view of a portion of Fig. 2 showing more particularly the capillary action of the fluid in the receptacle in the supply of writing fluid to the nib and feed bar extending from the holder; Fig. 4 is a sectional view of a modified form of receptacle showing the lower end of the pen holder together with the pen nib and feed bar in elevation associated therewith; Fig. 5 is a sectional view similar to Fig. 2 of a modified form of reservoir desk stand embodying the features of this invention, the pen holder being shown fragmentarily in elevation; Fig. 6 is an enlarged fragmentary sectional view of Fig. 5 showing more particularly the capillary action of the fluid in the receptacle; Fig. 7 is an enlarged fragmentary sectional view taken on the line T-7 of Fig. 6; Fig. 8 is an enlarged fragmentary sectional view taken on the line 8-8 of Pig. 5; Fig. 9 is a central sectional view of a pen holder including the feed bar and pen nib extending from one end thereof for use in connection with the reservoir desk stand of the present invention; and Fig. 10 is an enlarged fragmentary view partially in section of a modified form of pen holder adapted for use with the device of the present invention.

Referring now to the drawings, and more particularly to Figs. 1 to 3, inclusive, thereof, the reservoir desk stand embodying the features of this invention is shown as comprising a base 15 and a receptacle 16, the latter receiving the pen nib 17 and feed bar 18 extending from the end of a pen holder 19.

The base 15 is shown as preferably comprising an elongated substantially shallow, flat top, hollow base, cast of a composition material although, of course, it is apparent that the material employed may be of glass, rubber, Bakelite, or any material of substantial rigidity and of a moisture-proof or liquid-tight character. If the base is to contain and thus have direct contact with the writing fluid, the above materials are preferably employed although if any absorbent or non-rigid material is used for appearance effect, such material would be a covering material for that rigid moisture-proof material which is in direct contact with the writing fluid. In the drawings, however, a composition base is shown having upper, lower and side walls 20, 21 and 22, respectively, the lower wall 21 being formed as a separate piece and fitted into a peripheral recess 23 along the side walls 22 and sealed 4 therein.

A partition 24 Is preferably cast integrally with the top wall 20 for dividing the hollow base into two compartments 25 and 26, the compartment 25 forming a reservoir for containing a supply of j0 writing fluid and the compartment 26 forming an expansion chamber. A restricted passage 21 is cut or otherwise formed in the partition 24 so as to permit a communication between the reservoir and the expansion chamber. The depth IS of the passage, of course, controls the height of the fluid in the expansion chamber. The passage 21 is bounded at its upper end by a tapered wall, the wall converging from the expansion chamber in the direction of the reservoir in order to facilitate the flow of air from the expansion chamber into the reservoir in the manner hereafter to be explained, the air taking the place of the ink withdrawn from the reservoir to the receptacle in use.

15 An opening is cut or otherwise formed in the upper wall 20 of the base adjacent the expansion chamber 26 for receiving a removable closure 29.

The receptacle 16 is preferably fixedly mounted in the closure 29 and is removable with the cloro sure when it is desired to fill the reservoir 25 with a writing fluid. In the latter instance the base is set so as to rest on the end wall bounding the reservoir 25 opposed to the partition 24. The supply of fluid is poured into the expansion chamri ber from whence it is directed into the reservoir through the restricted passage 27, the tapered wall of the passage facilitating the passage of air into the reservoir. When the reservoir 25 is filled with writing fluid the base is then turned to rest on the bottom wall 21, as shown in Fig. 2, whereafter the fluid supply in the reservoir 25 may flow into the expansion chamber to the height indicated in Fig. 2 by the letter A which is the height of the passage 27 at its most restricted point. In order that the fluid level be very closely maintained within the receptacle, it is preferable that the receptacle extend to meet the top of the bottom wall 21 of the base and in this instance a recess 30 is cut or otherwise formed in the top surface of the bottom wall 21 from beyond the partition 24 to extend below the receptacle 16.

The recess 30 is approximately the width of the receptacle and provides a communication between the reservoir 25, the expansion chamber 26, and the receptacle 16.

The receptacle 16 is provided with an upper end opening 31 of comparatively enlarged cross section and a lower opening 32 of comparatively reduced cross section, the two openings intercommunicating. The upper end opening may be outwardly flared as at 33 to facilitate the entry of the writing point end of the holder 19 into the receptacle. The flared end provides a shoulder at the juncture thereof with the upper end opening 31 against which the end 34 of the holder abuts for seating .the holder in a desired position with respect to the fluid level in the lower end opening of the receptacle.

Referring now more particularly to Pig. 3 of the drawings, a film of fluid wets the side wall of the lower end opening to a point somewhat above the normal fluid level indicated by the letter A and thereby provides a film of fluid above the normal fluid level. It is preferable to have the shoulder 34 at the lower end of the pen holder 19 abut the shoulder in the receptacle at the upper end opening at a point such that the tip of the pen nib 17 is immersed in this film to substantially the fluid level A. In this position, the upper surface of the pen nib lies closely adjacent the wall of the lower end opening so that if it does not actually contact the wall it will at least be spaced therefrom merely a distance sufficient to afford capillary attraction between the wall and the nib.

The distance between the nib 17 and the inner wall of the lower end opening and the width of the slit of the nib are of capillary dimension so that fluid will be drawn upwardly from the fluid supply into the combs and fissures 35. It will be noted that the end of the feed bar is elevated above the fluid level A so that the slit of the pen nib is the only means of communication between the fluid supply and the feed bar which latter forms a reservoir for a reserve supply of fluid to the slit of the pen nib when the hold is removed from the receptacle in writing. In this manner of fluid supply only such fluid as will fill the combs and fissures of the feed bar and the channel formed by the slit of the pen nib are provided with writing fluid. There is no material surplus of writing fluid to cling to the non-capillary portions of either the feed bar or pen nib.

Referring now more particularly to Fig. 4 of the drawings, a receptacle 38 is disclosed which may be substituted for the receptacle previously shown in the desk stand of Figs. 1 to 3, inclusive.

The receptacle 36 has an upper end opening 37 of relatively enlarged cross section and a lower end opening 38 of substantiall( reduced cross section formed in a substantially cylindrical member and disposed in a recess within the lower end of the receptacle 36. Instead of the upper end opening , 37 flaring as in the previously described figures to facilitate the entrance of the pen nib and feed bar into the receptacle, the receptacle is provided with a very substantially enlarged opening 39-at its upper end with a recess 40 communicating therewith for receiving a reduced extension 41 of the pen holder 42.

The cylindrical portion containing the upper and lower end portions 37 and 38 in its position In the recess of the receptacle 36 holds a flexible washer 43 in position to serve as a wiper element for wiping any surplus fluid from the surface of the pen nib 44 when the same is removed from the receptacle. While the application of a wiper member in the present construction has a more or less minimum value because of the capillary feed of the writing fluid to the reservoir formed in the feed bar, still its application here and to other reservoir desk stands may be desirable and particularly to those desk stands wherein the pen holders thereof are not supplied with fluid by capillary action. The fluid level and the action of the fluid in this modified form of receptacle is the same as that described with reference to the preceding figures and the one receptacle may be substituted for the other.

Referring now more particularly to Figs. 5 to 8, inclusive, the reservoir desk stand shown therein comprises a base 45 preferably comparatively shallow and substantially flat and formed of a -material which is non-absorbent or liquid-tight and which preferably may be cast. The base is hollow and comprises upper, lower and side walls 46, 47 and 48, respectively, having a partition 49 dividing the base into a reservoir 50 and an expansion chamber 51.

The partition 49 is provided with a restricted passage 52 affording communication between the reservoir 60 and the expansion chamber 51. The bottom wall 47 is preferably formed of a separate piece fitting in a peripheral recess 53 in the side walls 48, the wall being sealed so as to prevent leakage of the fluid therefrom.

The upper wall 46 is provided with an aperture 54 adjacent the expansion chamber 51, which aperture is preferably threaded to receive an externally threaded collar 55. An apertured support 66 is disposed on the upper surface of the lower wall 47 within the expansion chamber 51, the material bounding the aperture of the support being of arcuate formation to receive and provide a seat for the external spherical surface of the receptacle 57. The inner bore of the collar 55 is likewise of arcuate configuration to seat on the spherical external surface of the receptacle 57, the necessary tension between the surfaces thereof and the surfaces of the support being accommodated by an adjustment of the collar 55 in screwing the collar into or out of the threaded aperture 54 of the top.wall of the base. Thus, the substantial equivalent of a ball- and socket is obtained for providing a :universal movement of the receptacle to various positions of angular adjustment so that the :pen holder 58 may. be adjusted to a desired position for convenience in grasping by the hand in writing. Hereafter and in the claims it is to be understood that where the receptacle is recited as being secured to the base for movement to various positions of angular adjustment, such movement includes a pivotal movement of the receptacle as well as a revoluble and rotatable movement thereof or any one of them.

The receptacle. 7 is provided with an upper end opening 59 and a lower end opening 60, the upper end opening communicating with a flared opening 61 and being of comparatively enlarged cross sectional area and the lower end opening 60 being of comparatively reduced cross sectional area. A shoulder is formed at the juncture of the flared opening 61 and upper end opening 59 and a shoulder is formed at the upper end of the flare to seat respectively the end 62 of the reduced extension of the pen holder and the end 63 of the pen holder proper. The shoulders are so disposed in the receptacle as to seat the holder in a position such that the pen nib lies closely adjacent.the inner wall of the lower end opening 60 in a position elevated above the end of the wall.

Also the wall may be fluted or provided with a plurality of channels 64 of capillary dimensions so thrt the writing fluid will be attracted up the side wall.

A portion of the external spherical surface of the receptacle is also provided with a plurality of capillary channels 65 communicating with a recess 66 in the upper surface of the bottom wall 47. The recess 66, in turn, communicates with the reservoir 50 for the supply of writing fluid to the capillary channels 65 and therethrough to the capillaries 64 which latter supply the fluid to the channel of the pen nib.

Fluid from the slit of the pen nib 67 is attracted to the fissures and combs of the feed bar 68 from the above system of capillary channels. In this construction, irrespective of the angular position of the receptacle 57 and thus the pen holder 58, a supply of writing fluid is maintained from the reservoir to the pen nib although at no time is the pen nib or feed bar immersed directly in the reservoir supply. All the fluid fed to the pen nib and feed bar is supplied by capillary attraction which, of course, prevents the over supply or accumulation of writing fluid"onto the nib or feed bar other than in the capillary potions in communication with each other and with the slit in the nib.

Referring now more particularly to ig. 9 of the drawings, an ordinary dip pen is disclosed comprising a hollow barrel 69 having a central bore 70 extending from end to end of the barrel, one end of the barrel having a threaded recess to receive a threaded reduced extension I1 of a hollow quill-like end portion 72. The other end of the holder is provided with a feed section 73 having a pen nib 74 and a feed bar 75 projecting therefrom. The feed section 73 is formed of a collar-like portion having a reduced elongated threaded extension 17 for engaging the threaded end of the bore 70.

The central opening of the feed section 13 receives the feed bar 15 and pen nib 74, the opening in the;feed section 73 and the cross section of the feed bar being circular. Since the cross sectional areas of the feed bar and the opening in the feed section 73 are circular and since the pen nib is fitted on top of the feed bar and within the opening, a gap is formed in the assembly thereof between the edge of the nib and the edge of the relief cut in the feed bar for receiving the pen nib and also a gap is caused by the nib pushing the feed section out of circular cross section.

Because of these gaps, there is. a communication between the combs 76 or the other capillary passages of the feed bar and the hollow of the pen barrel. When the dip pen is used in writing and is grasped by the hand, the heat from the hand is transmitted to the interior of the barrel to expand the air therein. The expanded air naturally must either become compressed or be permitted to pass out into the atmosphere. Because of the gaps created in the assembly of the feed section, feed bar and pen nib to the holder, this expanded air would naturally flow through these gaps if no other place of lesser resistance offered itself for expansion.

When the dip pen is in position in the receptacle the pen nib and feed bar are provided with writing fluid through the capillary attraction created in the slit of the nib to fill all the places of capillary dimension. The above noted gaps as well as the fissures and combs of the feed bar are thus filled with writing fluid. In writing should the heat from the hand expand the air within the hollow holder and the only means of communication with the atmosphere is through the gaps and other capillary passages of the feed bar and pen nib, this expanded air would normally cause the flow of ink to be augmented abnormally which might result in blots on the writing surface.

Writing fluid is fed by capillary attraction to the writing surface and if this normal action in writing is augmented by the force of the expanded air, a greater amount of fluid is present than is necessary for writing and flooding results. In order to alleviate this condition a vent 10a is provided in the holder communicating between Sthe hollow thereof and the atmosphere, the vent Sproviding a course of least resistance for the expanded air so that a normal action of the feed bar and pen nib is obtained in writing.

Referring now more particularly to Fig. 10 of the drawings, the pen holder shown therein com4a prises a holder portion 78 and shank portion 19 pivotally secured thereto by means of a pin 80.

The shank portion 79 has a bifurcated end portion 79i for receiving a tongue 81 extending from the pen of the holder 78. The tongue 81 has a 4-; depression 82 for receiving a projection 83 extending from a disc 84. The disc 84 is in turn urged into a cooperative relation with the tongue by means of a compression spring 85 held together with the disc 84 within the hollow bore 86 of the .0 shank 79.

When in a position for writing the holder 18 is held in axial alignment with the shank 17 by reason of the forced engagement of the projection 83 in the recess 82 by means of the compression spring 85. When it is desired to pivot the holder to a position such that it may lie substantially horizontally or in a plane substantially that of the flat top of the base, the compression of the spring 85 is overcome by force.

of) While several embodiments of this invention are herein shown and described, it is to be understood that various modifications thereof may be apparent to those skilled in the art without departing from the spirit and scope of this inven(i5 tion and, therefore, the same is only to be limited by the scope of the prior art and the appended claims.

We claim: 1. A reservoir desk stand comprising a base, a receptacle for receiving the pen nib and feed bar extending from the end of a pen holder, a reservoir for writing fluid in said base, a restricted passage communicating between said reservoir and said receptacle for controlling the height of fluid in said receptacle, and a shoulder in said receptacle for seating said holder in a position such that said pen nib lies closely adjacent the inner wall thereof with the writing point end thereof being immersed in the fluid and the feed bar elevated above the normal fluid level.

2. A reservoir desk stand comprising a base, a receptacle for receiving the pen nib and feed bar extending from the end of a pen holder, said receptacle having enlarged and reduced bore portions, a reservoir for writing fluid in said base, a restricted passage communicating between said reservoir and said receptacle for controlling the height of fluid in said receptacle, and a shoulder in said receptacle for seating said holder in a position such that at least a portion of said pen nib lies closely adjacent the bore of the reduced portion thereof with the writing point end thereof being immersed in the fluid and the feed bar elevated above the normal fluid level. 3. A reservoir desk stand comprising a base, a receptacle having upper and lower end openings, the upper end opening being of enlarged cross sectional area for receiving and for wholly enclosing the pen nib and feed bar extending from the end of a pen holder, a reservoir for writing fluid in said base, a restricted passage communicating between said reservoir and the lower end opening of reduced cross sectional area of said receptacle for controlling the height of fluid in said receptacle, and a shoulder in said receptacle for seating said holder in a position such that said pen nib lies closely adjacent the inner wall of the lower end opening with the writing point end thereof being immersed in the fluid and the 85 feed bar elevated above the normal fluid level.

4. A reservoir desk stand comprising a base, a receptacle for receiving the pen nib extending from the end of a pen holder, a reservoir for writing fluid in said base, a restricted passage communicating between said reservoir and said receptacle for controlling the height of fluid in said receptacle, said receptacle being relatively wettable with the writing fluid to attract a film of fluid on the side walls thereof above the normal fluid level, and a shoulder in said receptacle for seating said holder in a position such that said pen nib lies closely adjacent the inner wall thereof with the writing point end thereof being immersed in the film of fluid which wets said inner wall and the feed bar terminates above said normal fluid level.

5. A reservoir desk stand comprising an elongated flat-top hollow base, a partition in said hollow base dividing said base into two compartments, a receptacle for receiving and wholly enclosing the pen nib extending from the end of a pen holder and removably disposed in one of said compartments, a reservoir for writing fluid in the other of said compartments, a restricted passage in said partition communicating between said reservoir and said receptacle for controlling the height of fluid in said receptacle, and a shoulder in said receptacle for seating said holder in a position such that the writing point end of the 6S pen nib is immersed in the fluid and the feed bar terminates above said normal fluid level.

6. A reservoir desk stand comprising an elongated flat-top hollow base, a partition in said hollow base dividing said base into two compartments, the top of said base having an opening communicating with one of said compartments, a removable closure for said opening, a receptacle fixed to said removable closure and extending into said compartment for receiving the pen nib T extending from the end of a pen holder, a reservoir for writing fluid in the other of said compartments, a restricted passage in said partition communicating between said reservoir and said receptacle for controlling the height of fluid in said receptacle, and a shoulder in said receptacle for seating said holder in a position such that the writing point end of the pen nib is immersed in the fluid and the feed bar terminates above said normal fluid level.

7. A reservoir desk stand comprising a base, a receptacle having upper and lower end openings, the upper end opening being of an enlarged cross sectional area for receiving the pen nib extending from the end of a pen holder, a reservoir for writing fluid in said base, a restricted passage communicating between said -reservoir and the lower end opening of reduced cross sectional area of said receptacle for controlling the height of fluid in said receptacle, said lower end opening having a plurality of longitudinally extending passages of capillary dimension communicating with said fluid in said receptacle and extending above the fluid level, and a shoulder in said receptacle for seating said holder in a position such that the writing point end of said pen nib lies closely adjacent said capillary passages and the feed bar terminates above said normal fluid level.

8. A reservoir desk stand comprising a base, a receptacle having upper and lower end openings, the upper end openings being of an enlarged cross sectional area for receiving the pen nib extending from the end of a pen holder, a reservoir for writing fluid in said base, a restricted passage communicating between said reservoir and the lower end opening of reduced cross sectional area of said receptacle for controlling the height of fluid in said receptacle, said lower end opening having longitudinally extending ridges and grooves within the bore thereof in which the grooves are of capillary dimension communicating with said fluid in said receptacle and extending above the fluid level, and a shoulder in said receptacle for seating said holder in a position such that the writing point end of said pen nib lies closely adjacent said capillary passages.

9. A reservoir desk stand comprising a base, a receptacle for receiving the pen nib extending from the end of a pen holder, said pen nib being wholly contained within said receptacle, a reservoir for writing fluid in said base, said receptacle communicating with said reservoir and being secured to said base and movable thereon to various positions of angular adjustment, and means providing communication in any angular position of said receptacle for the supply of writing fluid from said reservoir to said pen nib.

10. A reservoir desk stand comprising a base, a receptacle for receiving the pen nib extending from the end of a pen holder, said pen nib being wholly contained within said receptacle, a reservoir for writing fluid in said base, said receptacle communicating with said reservoir and being secured to said base and movable thereon to various positions of angular adjustment, and channels of capillary dimensions on said receptacle providing communication in any angular position of said receptacle for the supply of writing fluid from said reservoir to said pen nib.

11. A reservoir desk stand comprising a base, a receptacle having upper and lower end openings, the upper end opening being of an enlarged cross sectional area for receiving the pen nib extending from the end of a pen holder, a reservoir for writing fluid in said base, a restricted passage communicating between said reservoir and said receptacle wholly containing said pen nib and said receptacle being secured to said base and movable thereon to various positions of angular adjustment, and channels of capillary dimensions on said receptacle providing communication between the fluid from said restricted passage and said lower opening of reduced cross sectional area in any angular position of said receptacle for the supply of writing fluid from said reservoir to said pen nib.

12. A reservoir desk stand comprising a base, a receptacle of substantially spherical external contour having an opening for receiving the pen nib extending from the end of a pen holder, a reservoir for writing fluid in said base, said receptacle wholly containing said pen nib and communicating with said reservoir and being secured to said base for universal movement to various positions of angular adjustment, and means providing communication in any angular position of said receptacle for the supply of writing fluid from said reservoir to said pen nib.

13. A reservoir desk stand comprising a base, a receptacle of substantially spherical external contour having an opening for receiving the pen nib extending from the end of a pen holder, a reservoir for writing fluid in said base, said receptacle wholly containing said pen nib and communicating with said reservoir and being disposed between seats on said base for universal movement to various positions of angular adjustment, and channels of capillary dimensions on the external spherical surface of said receptacle providing communication in any angular position of said receptacle for the supply of writing fluid from said reservoir to said pen nib.

14. A reservoir desk stand comprising a hollow 'base having upper, lower and side walls, a receptacle of substantially spherical external contour having an opening extending therethrough for receiving the pen nib extending from the end of a pen holder, a reservoir for writing fluid provided by said hollow base, an apertured support having an arcuate seat and resting on said lower wall, said receptacle being movably supported on said arcuate seat for universal movement to various positions of angular -adjustment, a restricted passage communicating between said reservoir and the aperture of said support, and channels of capillary dimensions on the external surface of said receptacle in communication in any position of said receptacle between the opening thereof and the aperture of said support for the supply of writing fluid from said reservoir to said pen nib.

15. A reservoir desk stand comprising a hollow base, a partition in said hollow base dividing said base into two compartments, a receptacle of substantially spherical external contour hav- Ce ing an opening extending therethrough for receiving the pen nib extending from the end of a pen holder and disposed in one of said compartments, a reservoir for writing fluid in the other of said compartments, an apertured support having an arcuate seat and resting on said lower wall, a restricted passage in said partition and extending beneath said support for communication between said reservoir and the aperture of said support, said receptacle being movably supported on said arcuate seat for universal movement to various positions of angular adjustment, and channels of capillary dimensions on the external surface of said receptacle providing communication in any angular position of said receptacle between the opening thereof and the aperture of said support for the supply of writing fluid from said reservoir to said pen nib.

16. A reservoir desk stand comprising a base, a receptacle having upper and lower end openings, the upper opening receiving the pen nib extending from the reduced end of a pen holder, a shoulder in a recess between said upper and lower end openings providing a seat for the reduced end of said pen holder and being so disposed as to elevate the enlarged portion of said holder out of said recess, a reservoir for writing fluid in said base, said receptacle wholly containing said pen nib and communicating with said reservoir and being movably secured to said base to various positions of angular adjustment, and means providing communication in any angular position of said receptacle for the supply of writing fluid from said reservoir to said pen nib.

17. A reservoir desk stand comprising a base, a receptacle having an opening extending therethrough for receiving the pen nib extending from the end of a pen holder, a reservoir for writing fluid in said base, said receptacle communicating with said reservoir and being secured td said base and movable thereon to various positions of angular adjustment, and communicating channels of capillary dimensions in the opening and externally of said receptacle providing communication in any angular position of said receptacle for the supply of writing fluid from said reservoir to said pen nib. HOWARD S. WRIGHT.

LYNN P. MARTIN.