Title:
Rubber scuff plate
United States Patent 2193719


Abstract:
My invention relates to rubber wear strips or scuff plates used to protect the surfaces and corners of desks, chairs and other articles of furniture and has reference to the particular construction of the wear strips and the means whereby the same are applied. Protecting wear strips are known...



Inventors:
Witherbee, Foote Thomas
Application Number:
US25128739A
Publication Date:
03/12/1940
Filing Date:
01/17/1939
Assignee:
Witherbee, Foote Thomas
Primary Class:
Other Classes:
49/462, 220/DIG.3, 297/463.2
International Classes:
A47B95/04
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Description:

My invention relates to rubber wear strips or scuff plates used to protect the surfaces and corners of desks, chairs and other articles of furniture and has reference to the particular construction of the wear strips and the means whereby the same are applied.

Protecting wear strips are known to the art and consist generally of a thin strip of flexible material, such as vulcanized rubber or the like, having means to attach itself to the surface of the article to be protected.

One object of my invention is to produce an improved wear strip which can be readily and securely attached to the article to be protected and to provide further a novel attaching element which is concealed below the surface of the wear strip and which holds the latter firmly in its applied position.

I accomplish the objects of the present invention bi means of a combination of elements one embodiment of which is described in the following specification, set forth in the appended claim, and illustratively exemplified in the accompanying drawing, in which: Fig. 1 is a side view of a pedestal leg provided with a wear strip according to the present invention; Fig. 2 is a top plan view of the leg shown in Fig. 1 partly broken away on the horizontal section line 2-2 of Fig. 3; Fig. 3 is a transverse section on line 3-3 of Fig. 1; and Fig. 4 is a similar section showing the elements in a position before the strip has become finally attached to the leg.

Referring to the drawing, II denotes the pedestal leg of a chair having a narrow upper surface 12 to be protected by a wear strip. A series of nails 13 is driven into said surface along the longitudinal center line thereof and at suitably spaced intervals. Each nail comprises a relatively large substantially circular head 14, disposed in spaced relationship to the surface 12, and has its outermost lateral sections cut away on two chords parallel to the said center line (see Fig. 2).

The wear strip consists of an elongated strip 15 of elastic material having a width substantially equal to the width of the surface 12 to be protected, and provided with a convex upper surface 16, and a slightly concave lower surface 17.

A longitudinal slot 18 is provided in the bottom side 17 which slot widens inwardly into an undercut longitudinally extending passage 19, the greatest width of which corresponds substantially to the greatest transverse width of the rail heads 14. The passage 19 is thus defined by the solid top 20 of the elastic strip and two inwardly and downwardly projecting lateral flanges 21 separated by the slot 18.

In order to attach the wear strip 15 to the leg surface 12, the nails 13 are driven into the lat- °.u ter to about /8s of an inch of their final position and the wear strip is then spread and passed over the heads 14 of the nails (see Fig. 4). Finally, the nails are driven into position by pressure or blows applied to the outer surface of the wear strip. This flattens the convex under surface of the strip and holds it tightly against the surface of the leg.

I claim: A wear strip, comprising an elongated rubber strip provided with a longitudinal central slot in its under side, said slot widening inwardly into an undercut longitudinal passage, having the cross section of a trapezoid in which the two angles adjacent the side opposite the slot are each less than forty-five degrees, the lower surface of said strip comprising two parallel sections separated by said slot, each of said surface sections being slightly concave before attachment of the strip to the surface to be protected. THOMAS WITHERBEE FOOTE.