Title:
Steel for musical instruments
United States Patent 2184733


Abstract:
This invention relates to steels for use in pressing the strings of stringed musical instruments, such as guitars, while they are being played. In playing such instruments, a metallic bar, generally of cylindrical shape, is pressed upon the strings at different points along their lengths to...



Inventors:
Burgien, Herbert E.
Application Number:
US25829839A
Publication Date:
12/26/1939
Filing Date:
02/24/1939
Assignee:
Burgien, Herbert E.
Primary Class:
Other Classes:
24/545, 984/110
International Classes:
G10D3/00
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Description:

This invention relates to steels for use in pressing the strings of stringed musical instruments, such as guitars, while they are being played.

In playing such instruments, a metallic bar, generally of cylindrical shape, is pressed upon the strings at different points along their lengths to vary the pitch and equality of the emitted tone.

Because of the extensive range of movement of the bar along the strings, the bar must assume a variety of angular positions with respect to the hand and wrist. The present invention provides a holding means for the bar which will readily accommodate these different angular positions.

A preferred embodiment of the invention is ,disclosed in the drawing, in which Figure 1 is a side elevation.

Fig. 2 is a section on the line 2-2 of Figure 1.

Fig. 3 is a section on the line 2-2 of Figure 1, the parts being separated.

The bar 5 which is to be pressed against the strings of the musical instrument is preferably cylindrical in shape and of a length to extend across all the strings. At one end it may be concaved to form a thumb receiving recess 6.

Its other end may have a convex formation so that if desired only one string at a time may be pressed down by this convex portion. The bar may be made of steel, or of some corrosion resisting metal.

At a point preferably centrally of its length, Sthe bar 5 is formed with a screw hole 8 which is transverse to the axis of the bar. Outwardly from this screw hole and concentric therewith :i5 is a socket 9. The socket 9 should be of circular shape larger than the screw hole 8, and may be of shallow depth.

The finger band 10 is preferably made of spring metal and is split at II so that it will firmly clamp the finger inserted into it. The opening at one end of the band may be larger than at the other end, so that the band will fit the taper of the finger. Opposite from the split in the band is a bulge or protuberance, such as may be formed by pressing the material of the band outwardly at this point. This protuberance forms a recess 12 internally of the band and a boss 13 externally of the band. The boss 13 should be of approximately the size of the socket 9 in the bar 5 so that it will enter the socket.

To retain the parts together, a screw 14 is passed through an opening 15 centrally of the protuberance of the band, and is threaded into screw hole 8 of the bar 5. The head of screw 14 seats in recess 12 and should lie entirely therein. This is an important feature of the invention, because the head of the screw is thereby entirely out of the finger receiving opening of the band, and will not bear unpleasantly upon the finger of the player. The boss 13 of the finger band lies within the socket 9 of the bar and provides, in effect, a bushing between the screw 14 and the bar 5.

It is desirable, however, that the boss 13 fit somewhat loosely in the socket 9, and that the socket be slightly deeper than the boss 13, so that the boss may assume different tilted relationship in the socket. This permits the bar 5 to rock with respect to the finger band, as is necessary during playing. By the provision of the socket 9 to receive the protuberance of the finger band 10, the added advantage is obtained that the finger within the band is brought as closely as possible to the bar 5. This makes possible a greater ease of playing, since the bar is more closely within the grasp of the player and can be more readily manipulated.

In use, the player's forefinger of either hand is inserted in the finger band, and the ends of the bar are grasped between the thumb and second finger, the thumb preferably being pressed in the concavity 6. The instrument is played with the bar held in this manner, and all possible modes of playing are made possible due to the character of the pivotal connection of the invention. It is to be noted that the one device is as suitable for a lefthanded player as for the righthand player, since the pivotal connection permits the finger band to be turned relative to the bar so as to be grasped in either hand.

The pivotal connection between the finger band and the steel to be pressed against the strings permits the steel to pivot freely so that it may be laid across the strings in any desired angular relation at all positions along the strings.

Furthermore, the slight looseness of the pivotal connection permits the steel to assume different positions in the player's hand, so that variations in the mode of grasping the steel during playing will be readily accommodated. These several advantages contribute to the considerable ease with which a stringed instrument may be played by use of the steel of the invention. I claim: 1. A steel for use in pressing the strings of a musical instrument, comprising a bar, a finger band having a recess in the inner side thereof, and a connecting screw between the bar and band, passing through the band and into the bar, and having its head seated in the recess.

2. A steel for use in pressing the strings of a musical instrument comprising a bar, a split finger band having a recess in the inner side thereof opposite from the split, and a connecting screw between the bar and band, passing through the band and into the bar, and having its head seated in the recess.

3. A steel for use in pressing the strings of a musical instrument, comprising a bar having a socket in the side thereof, a finger band having a boss on the outer side thereof seating within said socket, and a screw passing through the boss and into the bar and retaining the parts together.

4. A steel for use in pressing the strings of a musical instrument comprising a bar having a socket in the side thereof, a split finger band having an external boss opposite from the split seating within said socket, and a screw passing through the boss and into the bar and retaining the parts together.

5. A steel for use in pressing the strings of a musical instrument comprising a bar having a socket in the side thereof, a finger band having a protuberance forming an internal recess and an external boss, and a screw passing through said protuberance and into the bar, having its head seated in said recess and retaining the parts together with the boss of the finger band seated in said socket. 6. A steel for use in pressing the strings of a musical instrument comprising a cylindrical bar having centrally of its length and transverse to its axis a screw hole and an outer circular socket, a split finger band having opposite from the split a protuberance forming an internal recess and an external boss, said boss being of a size to substantially fit said socket, and a screw, passing through the band, and having its head seated in said recess and being screwed in said screw hole to retain the parts together with said external boss within said socket.

7. A steel for stringed musical instruments comprising a bar to bear upon the strings, a finger band and a swivel connection directly between said band and bar about midway of the length of the latter, said connection being loose to allow the swivel axis to assume different angular positions with respect to the bar to thereby permit the bar to tilt lengthwise relative to the band, substantially as described.

HERBERT E. BURGIEN.