Title:
Game apparatus
United States Patent 2175892


Abstract:
This invention relates to improvements in game devices of a type employing spinning elements, the indiscriminate stopping of which ultimately predetermines the winner of the game. An object of this invention is the provision of a simple apparatus of the above type which is so constructed as...



Inventors:
Greene, Albert L.
Application Number:
US22378338A
Publication Date:
10/10/1939
Filing Date:
08/09/1938
Assignee:
Greene, Albert L.
Primary Class:
International Classes:
A63F5/04
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Description:

This invention relates to improvements in game devices of a type employing spinning elements, the indiscriminate stopping of which ultimately predetermines the winner of the game.

An object of this invention is the provision of a simple apparatus of the above type which is so constructed as to be particularly adapted for use in theaters, at fairs, bazaars, and the like, by reason of the fact that the indicating portion of the apparatus is so constructed and arranged as; to be clearly visible when viewed from a distant point either whether directly in front of or to the side thereof.

A further object of the invention is the provi13 sion of an apparatus of this type adapted to be used either in conjunction with the well known "Bingo" cards, or their equivalent, or which may be used in conjunction with lettered and/or numbered tickets previously distributed.

A further object of the Invention is to provide a device of this type having an indicating face or dial which is brightly illuminated and which has successively illuminated indicia on the face thereof in accordance with the movement of a -5 spinning member to afford the players a spirited period of thrills and suspense; and using, at the time of determination of the winner, sound effects to increase the impressiveness of the spectacle.

An important object of the invention is the arrangement of the apparatus in such a way as to allay all unjustified suspicion on the part of the players of any question of the fairness of the game.

In accordance with the above object the apparatus is arranged so that the players can clearly determine with certainty, regardless of the position from which they view the face of the apparatus, what the winning number is.

A further object of the Invention is to provide, in conjunction with apparatus of this nature, special winning arrangements whereby increased prizes are awarded.

A still further object of the invention is to SIncorporate in the above combination a subsidiary structure by means of which the apparatus may be employed in conjunction with lettered and/or numbered tickets distributed to the players, as distinguished from the use of the standard 60 "Bingo" cards.

A further object of the invention is to provide an apparatus of compact size adapted for use with many players, as for example several thousand.

0 These, as well as many other objects, including those concerned with structural features, are clear by means of the invention herein disclosed in several physical embodiments.

This invention resides substantially in the combination, construction, arrangement, and relative location of parts, all in accordance with the following disclosure.

In the accompanying drawingsFigure 1 is a front elevational view of one form of device in accordance with this invention; Figure 2 is a similar view with some of the indicia removed showing, in dotted outline, some of the structural parts in back of the indicator face; Figure 3 is a substantially vertical cross-sectional view of the structure of Figure 1; Figure 4 is an enlarged perspective view of one of the main light cells showing its construction; Figure 5 is a diagrammatic wiring view of the circuits involved for the large indicators of the o2 type shown in Figure 4; Figure 6 is a wiring view of the circuits used in conjunction with the smaller indicators appearing around the rim of the dial, see Figure 1; Figure 7 is a front elevational view of the commutator; Figure 8 is a cross-sectional view through a portion thereof; Figure 9 is a rear elevational view thereof; Figure 10 is a cross-sectional view showing a distributor detail; Figure 11 is a view of the braking mechanism for the large pointer; Figure 12 is an elevational view, partly in *. cross-section of the driving mechanism, for the main pointers and for the apparatus used with lettered and/or numbered tickets; Figure 13 is a wiring diagram for the operating mechanism used in conjunction with the lettered and/or numbered ticket portion of the game; Figure 14 is an elevational view of one of the small discs used with the lettered and/or numbered ticket game showing the indexing mechanism; Figure 15 is a front elevational view of a modifled form of apparatus in accordance with this invention; Figure 16 is a vertical central cross-sectional view of a portion thereof; Figure 17 is an elevational view, partly in crosssection, of the commutator mechanism used with this form of apparatus; Figure 18 is an electric circuit wiring diagram of the second form of apparatus; Figure 19 is an enlarged plan view of the form of commutator used with the second form of apparatus; and Figure 20 is an elevational view thereof.

Before attempting to explain in detail the full nature and operation of the mechanism a detailed descrptoa of the structure thereof will be supplie&. The frt form of apparatus will appear to a player substantially as it appears in Figure 1.

It includes a supporting framework of any suitable form, indicated more or less diagrammatically at I, Figure 3, supported on standards 2.

The only other portion of the apparatus visible IS to the players. s the large dial-like structure, which may be built up in a number of different ways. It consists of a casing, which may be built as an integral unit or of separate units as desired. It includes the circle of cells 3, which may be constructed as illustrated in Figure 4. They may be made of metal in the form of a casing 5 having an open front with a groove therein to receive a glass or other light transmitting plate I on which certain indicia are displayed. It may be noted that the plates 6 may be of translucent material, such as ground glass for example.

After the plate I has been fitted into this groove a cover 7 may be slid into place to lock the plate in and close the cell. Within the cell are a pair of electric lamp sockets 4' in which are mounted the electric bulbs 4. On the plate is the indicia, as shown, consisting of a pair of numbers of different size and the words "Winner" and "Bank". The word "winner" is associated with the larger number, while the word "bank" is associated with the smaller number. Briefly, at this point, the lager number with the word "winner" Indicates what the player wins, while the remainder indicates the portion returned to the operator's bank, or, in other words, it represents the percentage distribution of a given sum.

These cells 3 are arranged to form a complete circle, as shown, and in the actual apparatus it is preferred that the plates 6 be so constructed and have the indicia applied thereto so that the markings thereon are not visible at any distance unless the lights in back of the respective plates are lit.

The central portion I of the face of the instru60 ment is preferably of a light transmitting material, suitably decorated, and provided with a series of openings which are closed by plates 12, similar to the plates 6, and having percentage numbers thereon as indicated. In back of the U plates 12 are the cells 10 in which are mounted electric lights II. Briefly, when one of the lights II is illuminated, as will be explained later, the winner, who is determined as will be explained later, receives that percentage of a larger fixed predetermined sum. Another seal is provided in which are a number of lights 13 arranged to be illuminated when the apparatus goes into operation and viewable from the front of the apparatus. This is not illustrated in Figure 1 because it is intended that only when the lights are illuminated that their presence will be known, and this will result, because of the translucency of the plate I and the decorations thereon. In some cases it may be preferable to employ a translucent plate for the member 8, such as ground glass, and the area in front of the lights II may be arranged to display the name of the game, visible only when'the apparatus is in operation.

In another cell, suitably arranged as is clear TI from Figure 2, are another series of lights 15, which are arranged to illuminate three separated windows 14 an. the face of the dial in connection with the game used with lettered ,and/or numbered tickets, as win be explained in detail later. Briefly, numbers are displayed in these windows as determined by three revolving diss shown in outline at II in Figure 2.

Around the outer periphery of the face of the instrument are a series of small cells I closed on their front faces by means of plates similar to the plates I and having numbers thereon. In these smaller cells 9 are electric lights I' (see Figure 3). It is preferable, but not necessary, that the numbers on the fronts of the cells I be only visible when the respective lamps in back thereof are Illuminated. Arranged to move over the face of the dial is a pointer II which is mounted on a rotatably supported shaft 11 driven in a manner to be explained later.

Referring to Figure 5 there is diagrammatically shown at SW the supply wires of any suitable current source. At 1 is diagrammatically indicated any suitable means of connecting these wires, such as a push plug. One of the prongs of this push plug is connected by a wire 21 to one terminal of each of the three lights I3. The other terminal of each of these lights is connected by wire 21 back to the other prong. One of the prongs is connected by wire 22 to the blade of a switch 23 adapted to connect that wire to a wire 24 which extends to a common connection 28, which in turn is respectively connected to one terminal of each of the sockets 4' in the cells 3 in which are mounted the lamps 4. The other terminal of each pair of sockets in each cell is connected by a return lead, all of which have been indicated by the reference numeral 26, to respective binding posts 27 of a terminal board.

A series of binding posts 28, respectively connected to the other binding post 21 on the terminal board, are connected by the wires, which have been indicated as a group by the reference number 21, respectively to the contacting segments 32 and 33 of a commutator 31. At 35 is a spring finger or contact which is mounted on the shaft 11 so as to rotate with the pointer II and is arranged to move successively over the contact segments 32 and 33.

The details of the commutator are shown in Figures 7, 8 and 9. It consists of a plate 31 of insulating material on which the contact segments 32 are secured. The contact segments are arranged to overlap and have interposed between them, as shown at 34 in Figure 8, sheets of insulating material so as not to short circuit. It 53 will be noted that the contact segments 33 are smaller than the segments 32 and are slotted on their outer ends and held in place by means of locking screws 35 so that the amount thereof exposed may be varied by shifting them more or 6s less under the associated contacts 32. It is to be noted here that the smaller contacts 33 are associated with the lamps II and the adjustment thereof, as explained above, will Increase or decrease the chances of an enlarged percentage win, C3 depending upon whether more or less of the segments 33 is exposed. The areas of the segments 32 exposed remain fixed.

As will be seen from Figure 9, the respective wires 21 are respectively connected in any suitable manner to the segments 32 and 33. A single circuit for one of the lamps 11 will be traced for sake of completeness. Current flows from the wire 25 to one terminal of the lamp II (Figure 5), the other terminal of which is connected by the wire 78 26' to the terminal of the wire 27. The corresponding binding post of the terminal board 28 is connected by wire 29' to a contact 33 as shown.

Thus a circuit is completed to one of the lamps SII in a manner substantially similar to the completion of a circuit to one of the lamps 4 when the contact brush 35 engages the contact 33.

For each of the lamps I I there is a relay 37, one terminal of which is connected by the wire 36 to the current wire 25. The relay includes a switch 38, one terminal of which, as well as the other terminal of the winding of the relay, is connected to the same termiral of the lamp II to which the lead 26' is connected. The other terminal of the switch 38 is connected to a lead 39 common to the relays, which in turn is connected to one terminal of a signal device 40, such as a bell. The other terminal of this device is connected by wire 41 to the wire 25. The switches 38 are open when the relays are deenergized. It will be apparent that as soon as a lamp I I is energized the relay 37, which is in parallel therewith, is also energized, thereby closing its associated switch 38. The closing of switch 38 in turn connects the signal device 40 in parallel with the lamp so as to energize it. Switch 24 also includes a contact which is connected by wire 46 to one terminal of the motor 45. The other terminal is connected by wire 44 through switch 42 and wire 43 back to the plug 19.

Referring to Figure 12 it will be seen that motor 45, which is supported on a suitable framework Ia, is connected by meshed gears 47 and 48 to the pointer shaft 17. This shaft is journaled in a pair of bearings in the standards 49 and 50.

It may be noted that the pointer 18 is adjustably mounted on the shaft 17 by means of a set screw 18' so that the apparatus may be accurately adjusted. The shaft 17 passes through a pair of supports 31a and 59a. The commutator disc 31 is secured therein so as to be concentric with the shaft 17. The contact brush 35 is shown secured to the shaft 17 in a position to cooperate with the segments on the commutator 31. Also mounted on the shaft 17 is a flywheel 51 (see also Figure 11), which is engaged by a brake shoe 54 mounted on a suitably supported spring arm 53. At 52 is an electromagnet which, when energized, raises the brake shoe from the flywheel.

Referring to Figure 5 it will be seen that the electromagnet 52 is connected between the wires 24 and 20 so that when the apparatus is energized by the closing of switch 23 the brake will be disengaged. As soon as switch 23 is open, so that the motor 45 is deenergized, the brake is applied so as to bring the motor, and of course all parts connected thereto, to a gradual stop while reducing the time required to bring it to a stop.

At 55 is a pair of contacts. also part of switch 00 23. In other words, switch 23 is really a singlepole, double-throw switch with the fixed contacts arranged in pairs so that the moving blade engages both contacts of each pair, depending upon Swhich position it is thrown to. One of the contacts 55 is connected to one terminal of motor 45 and the other is connected by wire 56 to a common lead 55 (see Figure 6) to which one terminal of each of the lamps 9' is connected.

Referring to Figure 1 it will be recalled that the lamps 9' are in the cells 9 and that there are one hundred of them. The other terminals of each of the lamps 9' are respectively connected by the wires 58 to the segments 60 of a commutatoi 59.

Concentric with the segments 60, which are arranged in a circle as shown, is a continuous conducting ring 61.

Referring to Figure 12 it will be seen that the commutator disc 59 is mounted on the support 59a in a position so that the contact brush 35 may cooperate with its segments 60 and the conducting ring 61. Thus it now becomes apparent that the contact finger 35 cooperate with both commutators. However, as will be explained later, these commutators are never in use both at once, and hence this common contact brush 35 is possible.

In reality the connection between the return wire 20 and the brush 35, as shown in Figure 5, is not directly connected to shaft 17 or the brush, but is connected to the conducting ring 61, which is always engaged by the brush. The structural detail of the commutator 59 is clearly shown by the cross-sectional view in Figure 10.

The terminal prongs of the plug 19 are also connected by the wires 62 and 63 to the wires "0 64 and 65, respectively. Wire 65 is connected to one terminal of the primary of a transformer 67 and to one terminal of each of the motors 68, 69 and 70 which drive the discs 16. The other terminal of each of these motors is respectively *" connected through the switches 71, 72 and 73 with the wire 64, which is also connected through a switch 66 to the other terminal of the primary of the transformer 67. The secondary of this transformer is connected to the lamps 15, which are individually connected thereto through the switches 15a.

As shown in Figure 14 the discs 16 consist of discs of transparent or translucent material upon two of which, around the periphery, are displayed numbers from 0 to 9. They are shown reversed in Figure 14 because this view shows the discs 16 from the rear. The other disc 16, which will be the one displayed through the left hand window 14 (see Figure 1) has displayed thereon the letters of the alphabet successively arranged.

These discs are mounted on the shafts of the motors 68, 69 and 70, as shown in Figure 13, with the lights 15 arranged in back of them so as to illuminate the numbers or the letters thereon when energized. Associated with each disc 16 is a toothed wheel 74. In the case of the two numbered discs the toothed wheels will have ten teeth. In the case of the disc with the letters of the alphabet it will have twenty-six teeth. Supported adjacent the discs on a suitable bracket 78 are the levers 75 which are pivotally mounted thereon at the point marked 76. A spring 77 is arranged to hold these levers, which preferably have rollers on their free ends, in engagement with the toothed wheels 74. These levers and springs merely provide indexing devices to be sure that when any one of the discs 16 comes to a stop it will be properly positioned so that the number and letter will be correctly framed in the respective windows 14. The operation of this portion of the mechanism will be shortly described.

The discs 16, with associated mechanism, are mounted on the frame la in a manner similar to that shown in Figure 12 so as to be properly associated with the rest of the apparatus.

The operation of the apparatus will be described, omitting detailed tracing of circuits since this it is believed has been adequately done before. The apparatus when set up for use will appear, when viewed from the front, as shown in Figure 1. Let it be assumed for purposes of description that the device has been set up on the stage of a motion picture theater. The patrons have each been supplied with the usual "Bingo" cards or sheets on which a given number of squares have been ruled and each having printed therein a number. To start the game the plug 19 is inserted in circuit (of which this may be a switch), with the result, as explained before, that all three lights 13 light up, announcing in effect that the game is about to be started.

Switch 42 is closed, switch 23 is then closed, with j0 the result that the motor 45 begins to rotate the pointer 18. As it travels around in a clockwise direction the lights 9' in the cells 9 light up in succession. For example, as the head of the pointer 18 is opposite the cell I the light therein j, lights up and the number 1 becomes illuminated.

As soon as the pointer moves on to cell 2 it lights up, while cell I becomes dark. Thus it will be seen that a spot of light travels around the outer circumference of the dial in synchronism with the head of the pointer 18. The switch 23 is only held closed momentarily. As soon as it is opened the brake magnet 52, previously energized so as to lift the brake shoe off flywheel 55, is deenergized so that the brake is applied and the pointer is brought to a gradual stop. When it comes to a stop the cell on the outer periphery of the dial opposite the head thereof will remain lighted. Thus those players in the audience on whose cards the number appears punch, or otherwise mark, that square. The operator of the machine, who is of course on the stage adjacent the machine in full view, again momentarily closes switch 23, with the result that the light spot will again rapidly travel around the pe3 riphery of the dial and finally come to a stop as explained before opposite a new number. The patrons on whose cards that number appears similarly mark it. This continues, in accordance with the usual principle of a "Bingo" game, until the first patron has consecutively marked a complete row of squares in any direction. This determines the winner of that particular game.

That winner then goes up on the stage for the purpose of determining how much he will win.- In this case he is permitted to operate the switch blade of switch 23 into engagement with the contacts 55. It is hardly necessary to note, as those skilled in the art will appreciate, that this switch may be broken down into two o0 suitable switches for the purpose. The player completes the circuit to the motor 45 at the contacts 55 momentarily and then releases it. In this case it will be recalled that the motor is energized when releasing the brake so that as soon .5 as the motor is deenergized the brake cooperates to bring the pointer II to a slow stop. If the pointer stops in a position so that the brush 35 is on a segment 32 the associated lights 4 will be illuminated, lighting up one of the windows 6. ,o Assume that the window marked 6* in Figure 1 is lighted up. This indicates that from a predetermined and previously announced sum of money the winner gets half and the other half is retained by the theater and included in a larger 1; prize, which is often termed the "Jackpot". Of course if it so happened that there are several simultaneous winners they can each successively operate the apparatus to determine their percentage of win from the predetermined sum. It may be well also to note that there is a series of these predetermined sums, depending upon how much is to be given away on a particular night.

This sequence of operations is continued until these sums have been divided.

If, by chance, the pointer stops in a position so that the brush 35.1is on one of the narrower segments 33, then one of the lights II behind the windows 12 will light up. In this case the particular player gets a percentage of the "Jack. pot", depending upon which window 12 is lighted. Thus it is possible to win the entire "jackpot" if the 100% window is lighted. Of course, since the segments 33 are smaller than the segments 32, the odds in this case are greater.

The apparatus may also be used to play what may be termed a faster game in those cases where the theater's time is limited. In this case each patron, at the time he buys his entrance ticket, is given another ticket upon which appears a letter and a number. For each 100 patrons there 1will be a different series of tickets. The first hundred will receive the tickets marked A and they will be successively numbered from 00 to 99. The tickets for the next hundred patrons will bear the letter B and be successively numbered from 00 o to 99. This will continue up to 2600 patrons, after which double letters may be used.

For purposes of explanation let us assume that the attendance at the theater is 1200. This will necessitate 12 series of tickets including the letters A to L, inclusive. In order that there may be no lost motion it may be pointed out here that a series of letter discs I may be employed so that in the case of the 1200 attendance the disc will only bear the letters A to L. This will prevent the appearance in the left hand window 14 of letters of tickets not in use. The structure is of course arranged so that the letter discs, with their associated indexing wheels 74 may be easily put on and removed from the associated motor .R shaft. In playing this game the plug 1I is inserted, again lighting up the lamps 13, indicating that the apparatus is in play. The operator on the stage then closes switch (6, Figure 13.

Assume that the uppermost disc II, Figure 13, is the one opposite the left hand window of Figure 1. Switch 71 is closed, switch II is only clcsed momentarily and as soon as it is opened motor 68 can come to a gradual stop. By reason of the indexing mechanism the disc 1 will stop, 43 so that the letter is displayed in the left hand window. This letter then determines the hundred patrons who have a chance to win the prize, which has of course been previously announced.

The operator then closes switch 72 and switch IS for the lamp 6I associated with the center disc IS. Switch 72 is only momentarily closed and when opened the motor $I gradually comes to a stop and a number, from 0 to 9, is displayed in the center window. When this number is dis- ,,. played there is determined the ten patrons who may win. At this point it is noted, as will be apparent, that by this arrangement the element of suspense and excitement is involved. The operator then momentarily closes switch 73 and the co switch II' associated with the lamp II on the remaining disc 16. As soon as switch 73 is opened the motor 10 comes to a gradual stop and the final number is displayed in the right hand window 14, determining the winner. It will be ap- ,.parent that with this mechanism the game may be p:ayed much more quickly, thus adapting the machine to double feature programs.

A modified form of apparatus in accordance with this invention will now be described. The apparatus in this event will appear, when viewed from the front, as shown in Figure 15. It includes a supporting base III on which is mounted a large dial or display surface I1I which is divided off in any suitable manner into a series of segments. At the outer periphery are the areas 112 on which are printed, painted or otherwise mounted, the same indicia as are marked on the plates I of the previous structure. They have not been include4 in Figure 15 for sake of simplicity.

Arranged in a circle and divided into groups corresponding to the areas 112 are a series of electric lamps III. InterVtB etween the areas 102 are the smaller areas 104 opposite which are mounted the single lamps 105. Within the ring of lamps 103 is a circular casing 103' on which is displayed in the form of a ring the numbers 1 to 100, as shown in Figure 15. These numbers may be formed in any suitable manner so as to be easily readable at a distance. Within this circle is a series of cells 107 having the lamps 107' therein and having transparent windows on which are the percentage marks corresponding to the windows 12 of the previous machine. A pointer IiI is arranged to rotate in a clockwise direction over the face of the dial 101, and for this purpose is mounted on a rotatable shaft 109.

The circuit for this arrangement is shown in Figure 18. At I10 are a pair of circuit wires to be connected to the motor 122, see Figure 17, which is belted to the shaft 109 by means of a belt 122'. The wires I10 are provided with a plug or other suitable connection 112 to the connection box III. This box has another outlet to support 0 a connection plug 113 which is connected to the primary of a transformer III4 supplying a current to a signalling device 115, such as a bell. At 116 are the current supply wires from any suitable source connected to a main switch I17. The sup5 ply contacts of this switch are connected respectively to a pair of fuses and a pair of wires 121 and 122. One of the devices is connected by a wire 120 through switch 118 and wire 119 to the connection box, as shown. Wire 121 is connected to the connection box, as shown. It is also connected by wire 122 to a common lead 123 to which one terminal of each of the lamps 103 is connected. The other terminals of these lamps in groups of seven are connec fed by the wires 124 4 to the contact finger 126. One terminal of each of the lamps 105 is connected to the common connection 123. The other terminal of each of these lamps is connected by wire 127 to a contact finger 126. Thus there is a contact finger 126 for each group of lamps 103 and for each lamp 105.

The lamps 107', of which there is one for each of the lamps 105, are connected in parallel therewith as shown in Figure 18. There is a contact 125 for each of the contacts 126. All of the u contacts 125 have a common connection 127 with the other fuse. Each pair of contacts 125 and 126 forms a switch, as shown in Figures 17, 19 and 20, which is controlled by a pair of angularly adjustable cam discs 128 and 129. These discs are mounted in pairs on the shaft 109 and are angularly adjustable so as to be respectively adjusted to effect the completing of the circuit to the lamp groups 103 and the lamps 105 in proper relation to the position of the pointer 108. The contact fingers 125 and 126 are mounted in pairs on a suitable support 130. The cam discs of course rotate the shaft 109, see Figure 17. The cams of the switches 125-126 associated with the lamps 105 are so adjusted that the chances of the circuits to the lamps 105 being completed are much less than are the chances of the circuits to the lamp groups 103 being completed.

In the operation of this apparatus, if it is to be used as a "Bingo" game in accordance with the yI previous description, switch 117 is closed. Plugs 112 and 113 are normally in circuit so that as soon as switch Il1 is closed the bell I 15 begins to ring.

At the same time motor 122 causes the pointer 10I to revolve and with it the cam disc pairs. Thus the lamp groups 103 and the lamps 115 light up 8 in succession in synchronism with the travel ov the pointer 108. When switch 118 is open motor 122 is deenergized and the apparatus gradually comes to a stop. It may of course be noted that some form of decelerating mechanism, such as the brake previously described, may be used.

When the pointer comes to a stop the lamp group 103 opposite it remains lighted. The pointer of course comes to a stop opposite one of the numbers associated with the lighted group. The patrons of course have been supplied with the "Bingo" cards, as before, and those having that number of the cards mark it. This operation continues until one of the players "Bingos", as described before. He is the winner and goes on the stage for the purpose of operating the machine to determine, as before, his percentage win.

To do this he merely momentarily closes switch 118, causing the pointer to revolve and when it stops the amount of his win will be determined by the numbers appearing on the area 102 opposite the pointer. At this time again the lights 103 for that area will be illuminated increasing the display spectacle of the game. If the pointer happens to stop in a position so that one of the switches 125--126 s closed the corresponding lights 105 and 101' will light up. Thus the winner gets a percentage of the "jackpot" corresponding to the percentage sign displayed in the associated window 107. As a variation of this arrangement it will be apparent that the sum total of lamps 103 and 105 may be arranged so that there are one hundred, one for each of the numbers, so that when the pointer stops only one of this total will light up, further helping to designate the particular number opposite which the pointer has stopped.

From the above description it will be apparent to those skilled in the art that the devices herein disclosed are admirably adapted to accomplish the general objects of a device of this type, both as a structure and as a device for entertainment.

I am, of course, well aware that many changes in the details of construction of the device may be made without departure from the scope of the novel subject matter herein. It is apparent, for example, that instead of disc commutators and cam operated switches drum switches, which are known in many forms, may be used. Likewise the various forms of switching mechanism, cir- 5 cult connections and the like may be changed without departure from the subject matter of the appended claims. I do not, therefore, desire to be strictly limited to the disclosure, but rather by the claims granted me. What I seek to secure by United States Letters Patent is: 1. In a game apparatus the combination including display means having indicia on the face thereof, a plurality of electric lamps one for each 6 indicia, an indicator movable over the front of said means for cooperation with said indicia, motive means for operating said indicator when energized at the will of an operator, means actuated in synchronism therewith for successively energizing said lamps in synchronism with the movement of said indicator and for maintaining the lamp of a particular indicia energized when the pointer stops opposite it, and brake means energized with said motive means for releasing it T7 and deenergized with said motive means for quickly bringing the indicator to a stop.

2. In a game apparatus of the type described the combination including means forming a display face having a plurality of indicia thereon, an indicator mounted for movement over said face, means for moving said indicator, electric lamps respectively associated with said indicia, adjustable means operating in synchronism with said indicator for successively lighting said lamps and for maintaining the lamp lit for the indicia opposite which the indicator stops, adjustment of said means varying the chance of certain of said lamps remaining lit, and a braking device energized and deenergized with said operating means for releasing the brake while the indicator is operated thereby and for supplying the brake when the operating means is deenergized to bring the pointer to a gradual stop.

SO 3. In a game apparatus of the type described the combination including a dial having a plurality of series of indicia thereon, a pointer rotatably supported to operate over the face of said dial, a motor connected thereto for operating it, circuits for said motor, a plurality of lamps associated with the indicia on the dial respectively, a plurality of commutating devices respectively associated with said plurality of series of indicia operable with said pointer, circuits respectively 80 connecting said commutating devices with said lamps, means for selectively determining which of said commutating devices is in operation and hence which of said series of lamps is energized in synchronism with the. movement of said 36 pointer, and a braking device automatically released when said motor is operating said pointer and one of said commutating devices and is automatically applied when the motor is deenergized and another commutating device is in use.

4. In a game apparatus of the type described 40 the combination including a dial having a plurality of indicia thereon, a pointer fixed on a shaft for movement over the face of said dial, an operating motor connected to said shaft, a commutator comprising a fixed and movable part 4 having the movable part mounted on said shaft, a plurality of lights respectively associated with said indicia, and circuits connecting said commutator with said lights whereby the lights are successively illuminated in synchronism *ith the 60 movement of said pointer as it moves, the light associated with indicia opposite the pointer when it comes to rest remaining lit, the fixed part of the commutator having a plurality of segments thereon several of which are adjustable to vary Sthe area thereof exposed, whereby the lamps connected thereto have less chance of remaining lit than the others.

5. In an apparatus of the type described the combination including means forming a dial havSing a plurality of indicia thereon, a pointer rotatably supported to move over the face of said dial, a plurality of lights respectively associated with said indicia, a commutating device arranged for operation with said pointer, and circuits interconnecting said lights with said commutating device whereby the lights are energized in synchronism with the movement of said pointer and the light associated with the indicia opposite the pointer when it comes to rest remaining lighted, said commutating device being adjustable to increase or decrease the chances of particular lights remaining lighted when the pointer comes to rest. 6. In a game apparatus of the type described the combination including means forming a dial having indicia on the face thereof, electric lamps respectively associated with said indicia, a pointer rotatabaly supported to move over the face of said dial, means for operating said pointer, commutating means operable in synchronism with said pointer including a pair of groups of fixed members and a common movable member moving with said pointer, circuit connections between said commutating means and said lamps, and means for predetermining which of said pair of fixed members of the commutating device actively cooperate with said common movable member whereby particular sets of said lamps are successively energized in synchronism with the movement of said pointer, one of said lights remaining energized when said pointer comes to rest.

7. In a game apparatus of the type described the combination including means forming a dial having indicia on the face thereof, electric lamps respectively associated wth said indicia, a pointer rotatably supported to move over the face of said dial, means for operating said pointer, commutating means operable in synchronism with said pointer including a pair of groups of-fixed members and a common movable member moving with said pointer, circuit connections between said commutating means and said lamps, and means for predetermining which of said pair of fixed members of the commutating device actively cooperate with said common movable member, whereby particular sets of said lamps are successively energized in synchronism with the movement of said pointer, one of said lights remaining energized when said pointer comes to rest, said commutating means being adjustable to minimize the chances of particular lights remaining lighted when the pointer comes to rest. 8. In a game apparatus the combination of display means having indicia on the face thereof, a plurality of electric lamps respectively associated with said indicia, an indicator, said means and indicator being relatively movable, means for causing said relative movement at the will of an operator, means actuated in synchronism therewith for successively energizing said lamps and maintaining the lamp opposite said indicator lighted when said relative movement ceases, <;o and means for adjusting said last mentioned means to minimize the chances of certain of said lamps remaining energized.

ALBERT L. GREENE.