Title:
Hair fastener
United States Patent 2170778


Abstract:
This invention relates to an improvement in a fastener, and more particularly in a hair fastener or the like of the barrette type for adorning the hair and keeping it neatly in place. The invention in this case is an improvement in the type of fastener in which the metal clasp that is clasped...



Inventors:
William, Huppert
Application Number:
US23597138A
Publication Date:
08/22/1939
Filing Date:
10/20/1938
Assignee:
DELAMERE COMPANY INC
Primary Class:
Other Classes:
132/278, D11/74
International Classes:
A45D8/24; A45D8/00
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Description:

This invention relates to an improvement in a fastener, and more particularly in a hair fastener or the like of the barrette type for adorning the hair and keeping it neatly in place.

The invention in this case is an improvement in the type of fastener in which the metal clasp that is clasped to the hair is hidden from view by a non-metallic artistically designed covering.

It has been found that the clasp often slips out of the grasp of the ornamental covering. This invention therefore relates to a means for keeping the clasp in place and prevents its accidental slipping longitudinally of the covering. Also, this invention relates to a means for facilitating the speed of assembly of the clasp to the covering.

An object of this invention is to provide positive limiting stops formed integral with the nonmetallic covering to prevent excessive movement of the clasp in its longitudinal direction.

Another important object of this invention is to provide centering means for the clasp when assembling it to its cover thereby increasing the speed and accuracy of assembly.

Other objects and advantages of this invention will become apparent as the description proceeds, reference being had to the accompanying drawing, in which: Figure 1 is a front view of a curved bar type of hair fastener embodying my invention; Fig. 2 is a rear view thereof with the lower leg of the clasp partly broken away; Fig. 3 is a longitudinal sectional view thereof taken on the line 3-3 of Figure 1; Fig. 4 is an enlarged cross-sectional view thereof taken on the line 4-4 of Fig. 3; and Fig. 5 is a sectional view similar to Fig. 3 showing the invention as applied to a flat bar type hair fastener.

The metal clasp portion of the fastener is constructed of a springy metal and comprises a lower arm 10 and an upper arm II joined together by a bend 12. The arm 10 has a curved bent portion 13 at its end adapted to catch the end 14 of the arm 11 to hold the clasp around the hair when worn.

The covering for the metal clasp comprises a main body portion 15 of non-metallic material, preferably made of a hardened molded plastic or thermo-plastic substance such as acetate, cellulose composition, resins, Celluloid, or the like.

The front face 15' may be formed or molded in any suitable ornamented shape or design, or it may be plain.

The back of this non-metallic covering is formed with a longitudinal undercut groove 16 of a depth equal to the thickness of the arm 10 and of a width equal to the width of that arm so that this arm may be embedded therein and will not extend above the bottom surface of the covering.

Two parallel longitudinally arranged flanges 17-17 molded or formed integrally with the bottom surface of the covering are arranged alongside the undercut groove 16. They project upwardly and at right angles toward each other and are adapted to receive and hold fast the lower arm 10 of the clasp.

Also formed integrally with and on the back of the non-metallic covering are two raised lugs or stops 18-18. These are arranged near the ends of the fastener symmetrically thereof beyond the longitudinal limits of the metal clasp so that they encompass the clasp. These stops act to center the clasp and to prevent longitudinal slipping thereof from its centered position.

For assembling the clasp to the ornamental cover, the arm 10 of the clasp is positioned between the flanges 17 and centered longitudinally by the limiting stops 18. The flanges 17 are then rolled or bent over the arm 10 to hold the clasp firmly in place.

After assembly the stops 18 act to retain the clasp in position and prevent its longitudinal displacement. Figure 5 shows the invention applied to a flat bar type hair fastener. The same numerals are applied to the similar parts. The construction appears obvious and no further description is believed necessary. I do not wish to be limited to the exact details of construction herein disclosed but mean to include all equivalent structures as might fall within the scope of the appended claims.

What I claim is: 1. A barrette comprising a spring clasp formed with an upper and a lower arm connected at one end by a bend, a covering member having a centrally arranged longitudinal groove in its rear face of a length equal to the overall length of the clasp, said groove having an integral raised flange at each side and an integral raised stop at each end, the lower arm of the clasp being received in the groove with its ends abutting the stops to prevent any relative longitudinal movement of the clasp and covering, and being held in the groove by an overlapped portion of each of the flanges.

2. A barrette comprising a spring clasp formed with an upper and a lower arm connected at one end by a bend, a covering member having a centrally arranged longitudinal groove in its rear face of a length equal to the overall length of the clasp and of a depth equal to, the thickness of the lower arm of the clasp, said groove having an integral raised flange at each side and an integral raised stop at each end, the lower arm of the clasp being received in the groove with its ends abutting the stops to prevent any relative longitudinal movement of the clasp and covering, and being held in the groove by an overlapped portion of each of the flanges.