Title:
Pin ticket roll
United States Patent 2165672
Abstract:
This invention relates to pin ticket rolls. Pin tickets are sold in various forms depending on the manner in which the customer desires to use them. If they are to be marked bS hand, they are frequently manufactured in the form of separate individual tickets and are commonly packed loosely...


Inventors:
Joseph, Weimont
Application Number:
US26799239A
Publication Date:
07/11/1939
Filing Date:
04/15/1939
Assignee:
A KIMBALL CO
Primary Class:
Other Classes:
206/390
International Classes:
B42D15/00
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Description:

This invention relates to pin ticket rolls.

Pin tickets are sold in various forms depending on the manner in which the customer desires to use them. If they are to be marked bS hand, they are frequently manufactured in the form of separate individual tickets and are commonly packed loosely in boxes for shipment.

When tickets are to be marked by machine, they are commonly manufactured in the form of ) strips comprising a plurality of connected tickets.

In one form said strips comprise a limited number of tickets, say twelve, said strips being packed lengthwise in boxes in layers, with successive strips nested as closely as permitted by the pro5 jecting pins.

In another form said strips comprise a great number of tickets, say one thousand or more, each of said strips being wound in the form of a roll for packing and shipment. The nature f') of the tickets, however, has caused great difficulty in forming a satisfactory roll. For the wire staples of such tickets are usually so formed that they project at right angles to the plane of the ticket at points spaced somewhat from the edge thereof. Therefore, a roll of such tickets will either assume a flat form in which successive convolutions are spaced apart a distance equal to the length of the pins, or will assume a steeply tapered or conical form, in which each 00 successive convolution of the roll will be offset from the preceding convolution by a distance equal to the spacing of the pins from the edge of the ticket. Both forms are impractical for commercial use.

It has been proposed heretofore (Patent No. 1,690,976) to overcome this difficulty to some extent by the use of special staples so formed that the pins project at right angles to the plane of the ticket at points substantially at the edge thereof. The resulting roll is reasonably flat, and is satisfactory in those cases where this special form of staple is not objectionable.

It has also been proposed heretofore (Patent No. 2,112,627) to overcome this difficulty by bend,15 ing or turning the pins inwardly against the face of the ticket so that they lie substantially parallel thereto, and then winding the strip into a flat sided coil or roll. This proposal has been criticized on the ground that the bending or turning of the pins relative to the ticket tends to weaken the connection between the staple and the ticket, and also on the ground that it is difficult to restore the pins to the desired position perpendicular to the ticket face when the roll is unwound. It is an object of the present invention to provide an improved form of pin ticket roll which shall eliminate some of the objections to previous Stype of rolls.

Other objects and advantages of the invention will appear hereinafter.

A preferred embodiment of the invention selected for purposes of illustration is shown in the accompanying drawing, in which Figure 1 is a perspective view of a portion of a roll of pin tickets. 1o Figure 2 is a side elevation.

Figure 3 is a perspective view showing two tickets, one in form for attachment to merchandise and the other in form for winding in a roll.

According to the present invention each of the tickets comprising the strip to be wound is folded along a line parallel to the upper edge of said ticket and immediately adjacent but preferably below the points where the pins penetrate the ticket, so that when folded, the entire staple is carried with the fold to a position such that the pins lie parallel to the surface of the ticket.

This is illustrated in Figure 3. in which ticket A represents a ticket of ordinary construction having a staple I bent to provide the usual pins 2 projecting from the surface of the ticket at right angles with the pins spaced from the edge of the ticket in the usual manner. For winding into a roll the said ticket is folded on line 3 to assume the form of ticket B in which the pins lie parallel to the surface of the ticket closely adjacent thereto.

A ticket strip composed of tickets so folded may then be wound as shown in Figures 1 and 2, in such manner that the folded portions 4 of tickets of successive convolutions will overlap and overlie the folded portions of previous convolutions. This necessitates, of course, that each successive convolution be offset slightly from the preceding convolution, the offset being approximately equal to the thickness of the ticket stock plus the thickness of the staple wire, thus providing a reasonably flat roll, or rather one which is only slightly tapered. The rolls are usually wound on a suitable collar 5, of cardboard or similar material.

When the tickets are applied to the goods. the folded portion is straightened out so that the ticket again assumes the form of ticket A, Figure 3. In practice, it is found that the presence of the fold line in the individual tickets is of some advantage as the body portion of the ticket lies snugly against the goods when attached thereto.

It will be understood that the invention may be variously modified and embodied within the scope of the subjoined claim.

I claim as my invention: A pin ticket roll comprising a strip of cons nected tickets, each ticket being provided with a staple having a plurality of pins projecting at right angles to one face of the ticket at points spaced from one edge thereof, each of said tickets being folded on a line adjacent said pins, and said strip being wound in successive convolutions with the folded portions of each successive convolution overlapping and overlying the folded portions of the previous convolution, with the pins of each successive convolution projecting downwardly and lying between that convolution and the preceding convolution.

JOSEPH WEIMONT.