Title:
Disk charge-forming apparatus
United States Patent 2157110


Abstract:
This invention relates to disk-sorting apparatus. It is an object of the invention to provide a machine which automatically will assort disks under the action of gravity, a mass of disks being automatically separated into individual charges by a conveyor belt which assures, among other things,...



Inventors:
Bock, Alfred C. O.
Ernau, Jacob J.
Application Number:
US66202033A
Publication Date:
05/09/1939
Filing Date:
03/22/1933
Assignee:
Bock
Primary Class:
Other Classes:
198/483.1, 198/484.1, 198/637, 453/14
International Classes:
G07D3/12
View Patent Images:



Description:

This invention relates to disk-sorting apparatus.

It is an object of the invention to provide a machine which automatically will assort disks under the action of gravity, a mass of disks being automatically separated into individual charges by a conveyor belt which assures, among other things, that no disk may filter through the belt, that no mcre than a single disk be handled as a single 1o charge for transportation to a point where it will be discharged onto a disk-assorting member, that the effect of sticky disks will be eliminated as a factor in the operation of the apparatus, that two coins may not be disposed in flat relation, end l to end to each other, and that finger-wiping action, to break up combinations of more than one disk in a recess be accurate and positive.

It is an object of the invention to provide apparatus in which the discharge of a disk onto a disk-assorting chute is effected at the top end movement of a conveyor belt for the disk, the belt being designed so that no disk need pass therethrough, and, in fact, such result is prevented.

The belt rides freely, not requiring an imperforate .: buottom surface over which it should slide, to retain the disks within their recesses.

It is an object of the invention to assure that, when disks have been delivered to, and are moving along the disk-assorting means, no undesired ;0 effects, such as the disk turning end over end, or rolling on its edge, down the chute, are possible.

It is an object of the invention to provide apparatus in which disk assorting functions are performed by elements entirely distinct from the .5 conveying apparatus, assorting being independent of the conveying apparatus to the extent that it results entirely under gravitational action, and after the disk has been released from the conveying apparatus. The positioning of the disk for its 0 classification and the final discharge of the disk into its proper receptacle, all are functions of gravitational forces. The disk separates from the chute and is cast into its receptacle entirely by gravity. The removal of the disk from the chute Smay be made practically instantaneous so that in:erference between consecutive coins may not occur.

It is an object of the invention to provide an Sinclined disk-receiving chute in which, as disks enter at the upper end, these disks will be comrc-led to assume a position in which they lie aga;nst the chute with one edge, in every case, in contact with the same edge of the chute, all i .isks thus being assured positively a certain definite relationship, in all cases, to the chute as they move along down its extent.

It is an object of the invention to position disks in an assorting apparatus so that they will be tilted and then, when a disk finally arrives at the point where it is to be discharged into its particular receptacle, it will be spun sharply out of the path of movement along the chute, quickly eliminating interference with the next succeeding disks.

It is an object of the invention to apportion to each disk, and especially to those disks whose thicknesses may be factors in their separation, discharge openings commensurate with their velocity at the time when they arrive at the chute or openings through which they are intended to be discharged, and also to make mutilation of disks of defined thickness, such as coins, ineffective to interfere with the proper assorting function of the apparatus.

In the method and apparatus herein to be described, particular application is made of gravitational action and related principles in causing movement of disks, such as coins, in immediate cooperation with a member which automatically distributes the coins into separate receptacles in accordance with dimensions of the disk, the diameter being the most critical of these dimensions. Preliminary, however, to this ultimate separation of the disks into the desired groups, such steps as the removal of debris from an accumulation of coins, the separation from the mass, of disks other than those to be assorted by the apparatus, even though of diameters similar to or closely approximating those of the disks, and finally breaking up the mass of coins into single charges, the charges being of disks in irregular order, or in any order, whatsoever, of their relative sizes, or in no order; the charges, when brought to the sorting element itself being so spaced that each disk will have been given a sufficient headway in its movement that, under the worst circumstances, no collision of consecutive coins or other interference with their rolling movements necessary for the final distribution into proper containers may occur. The apparatus to be described lends itself readily to increase in capacity by an adjustment of its width, and this without any requisite redesigning of the entire structure. The mere addition of sectional units each of which may be of substantially the same character, is all the change required to make the apparatus sufficiently comprehensive for the additional work.

With gravity as an element affecting movement of the disks for their separation into sev- 5g eral gradations, in order to, make the apparatus compact and to assure that the disks have a proper velocity, it is desirable that the disks commence their downward movement from a position elevated with relation to a table or similar surface upon which the apparatus is intended to be disposed. A belt conveyor serves this purpose, the construction of the conveyor being such that disks, dumped promiscuously into a hopper, are separated into individual charges of a single disk each. No matter in what condition the disk may be, whether it be sticky, or otherwise carry some undesirable element which ordinarily would materially interfere with the true functioning of such charge-forming apparatus, the possibility that a single charge include more than a single disk is precluded. Elements of the apparatus cooperate and positively function to separate from any charge which may have been built up from a plurality of disks, all but one of the disks. That segregated single disk moves along to the disk-sorting elements, where it individually and without hindrance from any other coin, enters properly into cooperation with the disk-sorting elements. The other disks, forced out of the undesired combination in the charge, are returned along the belt to the hopper, the manner of return tending to the elimination of the action of any such separated disk, sliding, rolling, or otherwise moving along the belt, to interfere with any other disk charge properly formed on the conveyor.

The belt brings its charges, thus positively limited to but a single disk, to, the peak of its movement. At the position where the belt makes its turns to travel downwardly, disks are dumped from the belt upon the disk-sorting elements themselves.

The belt, to effectuate certain elements of the invention, may be constructed from a plurality of plate members, flat members of appreciable width, linked for movement together. As the belt makes its turn to go downwardly, it becomes deformed from a smooth, continuous, substantially planar surface, into a, structure having faces angularly disposed one to the other. The member receiving and guiding disks from the belt to the disk-sorting elements is coordinated with this deformed belt formation so that, even though, at intervals, an appreciable opening must form between belt and disk-receiving member, still there is no danger that disks might fall through. Likewise, the movement of the belt sections with relation to each other, when so turning a corner, must produce an opening between them. Even when flat, there is a slit between adjacent sections. In spite of all this, and no matter how small or large the particular disk for cooperation with the apparatus may be, still such a disk will be properly retained.

Even a very thin disk will not fall through the slit between adjacent sections. This result is effectuated by interlocking portions of the belt with each other, and their relation, in functioning, to the disk-receiving member, after the belt has passed from its plane formation, and as ii is being warped around its pulley to move into cooperation with the receiving member.

7 Since the belt is made of plate members, sharp angles are produced when these members rela. tively pivot at the pulley. Therefore, wherea in the upgrade movement of the belt, the mem bers may continuously conform substantially ti the surface of a plane, at the pulley the belt wil take on the form of a section of a polygon. With this in mind, the belt has been designed of a plurality of plate-forming sections on each of which is formed depressed areas, the area being arranged so that, if two. sections be brought adjacent each other and brought into edge to edge abutment, the areas of one section will cooperate with the areas of the other section to form substantially a single closed, complete recess.

The dimensions of the recess may be, and for purposes indicated, preferably are determined so that the recess be large enough to receive any single disk that may be desired to be assorted by the apparatus, but not large enough to receive even two of the smallest disks for which the machine is designed.

While in each pair of recessed areas on adjacent plates, the units may be substantially of the same extent, the upgrade recessed area preferably is smaller in its effective extent than the downgrade area. A function is derived from this construction in that, while, in certain of the relations hereinafter to be described, the downgrade portion of the recess will itself comfortably receive and retain the smallest disk to be handled by the apparatus, its relation to other portions of the apparatus also will positively assure that such disk will be separated from the recess at the proper moment. The largest disk intended to be assorted by the machine, by this construction, may also be supported independently on this lower portion of the recess without overbalancing. Even when the belt turns at the pulley, and up. to a certain point in its rotation, a point determined for certain purposes of this invention, the disk will still remain securely balanced, retaining its position on that downgrade portion of the recess until it may, with complete safety, bridge across and be received upon the disk-receiving member, thus deriving the result that the disk will not tip over and fall down the slot formed as the belt turns the corner.

As force is applied to a belt constructed as described, elongation occurs. Finally, such elongation may become a set condition in the metal, and the plates retained adjacent to each other will be moved slightly apart to form a slot. It is easily seen that a slot of any length would dangerously affect the efficient operation of the apparatus, where the slot is of a length that 6( disks might fall through, if a disk, by chance, register with the slot while in upstanding position, as occurs especially in the hopper.

In this structure, the edges of the plates are formed with a plurality of notches, thereby pro- 51 ducing a plurality of fingers. Fingers and notches on the edge of one plate are related to fingers and notches of the adjacent edge of the next plate to form an interlock when the plates are in the plane-forming position of the upgrade, t6 Sand thereby constitute substantially a continuous surface. Any slot which might form between two adjacent plates is broken up into a plurality of separated slots. By properly dimensioning prongs and cut-outs, each slot section will be a Sreduced so that passage of a disk through the Sbelt may not occur.

In order to make the construction of apparatus of this type inexpensive, the conveyor belt, which, Sas indicated, has a plurality of recesses formed 7 - therein, has belt sections made up first, of a plate s the edges of which are formed as indicated to - provide prongs and indentations. With this plate Sis assembled, at the top face, a metal stamping 1 the opposed edges of which are formed of a plu- 1 rality of semi-circular cut-outs. With plate and stamping so assembled, the cut-outs define the recessed areas in exactly the same manner as if the metal plates themselves had been gouged or machined out. Furthermore, the stampings, at the edge of the upgrade portion of the recesses, are belled outwardly to form an upstanding curved edge, raised above the level of the metal stamping. By reason of this belled edge, if two disks should happen to be within the same recess at any time with the disks in edge-to-edge relationship, one of those disks necessarily is positioned with a face resting on the belled-out edge.

That disk thereby is raised to extend beyond the belled-out edge at a sharp angle to the surface of the belt. Disks, so positioned, are easily engaged by members disposed with relation to the belt, the members causing the disks first to roll sideways out of the line of the recess in which it first has been engaged; then, completely pushed out of relation to the recess, the disk slides downwardly along the belt, and into the mass of disks in the hopper again to enter a recess for its upward travel. The disk, once separated from the recess in this manner, has no tendency to interfere with other disks properly arranged in their respective recesses by falling, end over end, down the belt. The disk, as it is separated, moves to a position where it will slide smoothly down the belt without such interference.

For side-swiping members, fingers having angularly disposed faces may be utilized. These fingers rest by gravity against the belt, riding over the belled edge as well as other portions of the belt as the belt moves along. The fingers may have broad faces but narrow shanks, the faces terminating at their ends in points reducing the amount of metal necessary. Owing to the belledlt out portions over which the finger face must ride, these pointed ends are kept from engaging with the walls of the recess.

The fingers, for each successive line of recesses longitudinally of the belt, may be disposed 5 at different elevations. In such case, it would be preferred that alternate fingers be disposed at the same elevation. In this manner, fingers at different elevations, in spilling disks, will not drive them directly against a next adjacent fin0 ger.

Deposits of sticky substances on disks are wellknown hindrances to efficient operation of disksorting machines. In this case, such substances might restrain the disks from sliding off the 5 belt onto the disk-sorting member, when the disks have been brought to a proper position. For this purpose, associated with the pulley are a plurality of pins or similar members. As the belt passes over the pulleys, these members act through suit0 able openings in the belt to tip the coin away from the surface of the belt and, in spite of the retaining force of any such substance, to force the disk off the belt. Openings other than for cooperation with the members, or depressions 5 in the belt surface, may be provided to reduce to a minimum the amount of surface of the disk actually contacting the belt. The effect of any such sticky substances thus is reduced and even eliminated.

The hopper, for receiving bulk disks, is formed to gravitate the disks downwardly. The lower end of the hopper may be divided, by means of partitions, into a plurality of individual entrances to a plurality of stalls, each of which and its 5 partitions being so arranged that disks can move into the stall to form, if at all, combinations in which one disk is positioned above the other, and not one beside the other, in the same recess. The stalls taper sharply downwardly so that, at their bottoms, but a single disk at a time can enter, so that the disks, gravitating downwardly, finally are disposed flat against the belt.

Combinations which may be formed are produced after the belt moves beyond the stalls and beneath the pile of other disks in the hopper. Such combinations cannot be "flat" combinations, that is, two disks flat on the bottom plate of the belt. Different combinations result, one in which the two disks are in edge-to-edge relationship, one of them being sustained at a sharp angle by the upturned belled edge, or the second disk being disposed immediately on top of and in face to face contact with the first, possibly being so retained by some sticky substance. Any such combination is easily broken up by the fingers. The thickness of the stamped-out plate, though not sufficient to extend above the edge of any of the disks, is sufficient to provide a recess wall to engage a disk edge, but not sufficient to engage two disks, resting one upon the other. The height of the belled-out edge from the bottom of the recess is made sufficient to clear the top of one disk properly in the recess but not a faceto-face combination. The fingers will break up any such superposed combinations. The belled-out edge is disposed also so that the finger will be brought down against the belt face in sufficient time to engage against the top face of a disk properly in a recess frictionally to wipe the disk back against the downhill wall of the recess. As a result of this, the disk, when the belt commences to turn the corner at the top of its travel, will be in the position discussed in relation to overbalancing. Before the disk may be deposited upon the disk-receiving member, the belt will progressively and substantially gradually move into a position in which the coefficient of friction of the metallic surface of the disk against the metallic surface of the belt approaches the angle of the coefficient of friction necessary to effect sliding of the disk off the belt and onto the disk-receiving member. By the manner of association of belt and disk-receiving member, before the belt will have moved into any such relationship, the sections of the belt will have moved to a position in which the slot between belt and member will be substantially closed.

The disk-receiving member may have a slotted edge to cooperate closely with the slotted edge of the upgrade portion of the recess. Further, as the slotted edges cooperate, a prong inserted into at least one of the upgrade edge slots engages beneath a disk in the recess, and, with continued rotation of the belt, completely separates the disk from the recess, the disk being shoved by the belt onto the disk-receiving member. The disk, during this transition, goes through a movement from the original flat disposition on the belt, to an angular position with relation to the disk-receiving member, and finally to a slightly tilted position on the disk-sorting member, all without imparting to the disk any tendency to roll. end over end, or on edge.

From the disk-receiving member, the disk slides downwardly, by gravity, along the disk-sorting chute. That member assures that one edge of each disk will constantly contact with the same edge or wall of the disk-sorting chute. Assortment in accordance with diameters is thus made T5 possible. For this purpose, in addition to the normal downgrade of the chute, it is deviated laterally and obliquely from the normal slope of, or gravitational direction down, the inclined plane Sin which the chute is disposed.

Differences in thickness between two disks in the same grade are'accounted for by this apparatus. Even where flattening or other abuse may have occurred to a disk, still, within extreme limits, the apparatus has been made to function, eliminating possibility of error in assorting disks into their respective groups. Not only slight differences in diameters, but even where the disks have been maltreated and their diameter disproportionately increased to that of the next disk in size, still, by certain elements of this apparatus, the effect of efficient separation into the proper group will not be lost. As specific instances are the three smallest coins now in use in this country 0 are, the ten-cent piece or "dime", the one-cent piece or "penny", and the five-cent piece, commonly known as the "nickel", these being progressively larger in the order named. Pennies, either intentionally or otherwise, are flattened; Sin extreme cases, such flattening may enlarge its diameter to that of a nickel.

The coin thickness necessarily decreases, or, at least, a fin is produced at the coin edge. The constantly contacted edge of the disk-assorting chute, for this purpose, has a groove defined in connection with it. That groove will receive any such fin when the coins roll down the chute.

The length of the opening through which disks of that class, of proper diameter, should be preScipitated, is made of a sufficient length that, as the disk rolls along down the chute with one edge constantly in contact with the chute edge, the reduced fin will finally roll around to a position where it may enter the groove. Now the actual Sextent of disk bridged across the chute will be within the narrow limits of disks of the proper dimensions, and the disk will precipitate through the opening for disks of its evaluation.

The disk chute itself is constructed with the 5 purpose in view that a small portion of the disk shall be in frictional contact during rolling movement. Also, considering the distance within which the complete assortment of the disk must take place, the change of the angular position of the disk must be gradual. Disks delivered from the belt are practically flat against the slope of the plane. The smaller, and lighter disks, when deposited upon the disk-receiving member, are substantially flat against its bottom, and then Sgradually progress to an inclined position, the tilting not impelling the disk to rotate, end over end, or into a vertical position. The largest and heaviest disks are quickly brought to their full tilt upon reception on the disk-receiving member.

s0 Other objects of this invention will hereinafter be set forth, or will be apparent from the description and the drawings, in which is illustrated an embodiment of apparatus for sorting coins, and carrying out the invention.

S The invention, however, is not intended to be restricted to any particular construction or arrangement of parts, or to any particular application of such construction, or to any specific manner of use, or to any of various details thereof herein shown and described, as the same may be modified in various particulars or be applied in many varied relations without departing from the spirit and scope of the claimed invention, the practical embodiment herein illustrated and deor scribed merely showing one of various forms and modifications in which the invention might be embodied.

On the drawings, in which the same reference characters refer to the same parts throughout, and in which is disclosed a coin-sorting apparatus: Fig. 1 is a side elevational view, portions being broken away in cross-section to illustrate the general arrangement of elements of the apparatus embodying the invention; Fig. 2 is a plan view of the apparatus; Fig. 3 is an enlarged elevational view of a portion of the belt; Fig. 4 is a cross-sectional view, on the line 4-4 of Fig. 3; Fig. 5 is a detail plan view of one of the members used in making up a belt section; Fig. 6 is an elevational view of the member shown in Fig. 5; Fig. 7 is a detail view, on an enlarged scale, illustrating the relation of belt and coin-separating element as they move into the relation necessary to separate the coin from the belt for its movement down the chute; Fig. 8 is a similar view, illustrating the cooperation of a pin for separating a coin from its recess; Fig. 9 is a view, similar to Figs. 7 and 8, illustrating the manner in which a large coin is affected by the apparatus, and the manner of cooperation between belt and coin-separating member to effect discharge of a coin from the conveyor belt; Fig. 10 is a plan view of the coin-separating member, illustrating its cooperation with the 3t coin-receiving chute; Fig. 11 is a cross-sectional view, on the line 1 -11 of Fig. 10; Fig. 12 is a plan view of a pocket-defining wall for the hopper, only a portion being shown; 4{ Fig. 13 is a cross-sectional view, on the line 13-13 of Fig. 12; Fig. 14 is a view, from the downgrade side of a wiper finger, illustrating its construction; Fig. 15 is a profile elevational view of the finger 41 shown in Fig. 14; Fig. 16 is a bottom plan detail view of the wiper finger; Fig. 17 is a plan view of a chute embodying the invention; 5 Fig. 18 is a longitudinal cross-sectional view, on the line 18-18 of Fig. 17; Figs. 19, 20, 21, 22 and 23 are cross-sectional views, respectively, on the lines 19-19, 20-20, 21-21, 22-22, and 23-23, of Fig. 17, illustrat- 5 ing various relationships of the dime, penny, nickel, quarter and half dollar, respectively, to different portions of the chute intended for their cooperation immediately before their discharge; and 6 Fig. 24 is a cross-sectional view, on the line 24-24 of Fig. 17, illustrating details of the formation of the coin-assorting chute at that point.

It is to be understood that the specific description of certain of the elements of the coin-assort- 6 ing machine M, shown on the drawings, is given only to make clear one possible method of construction for apparatus embodying features of the invention. For instance, the machine shown includes a frame F to carry the many parts of 7 the apparatus. This frame may be made in any well-known manner, as, for instance, from a plurality of metal stampings, castings, or sheet metal parts, or, as in this case, from a pair of plates 10, assigned to define the sides of the apparatus. 7 2,15 These plates are retained in fixed, spaced-apart relationship, as, for instance, by cross-bolts 12 and such other rigidifying devices, as may be necessary, all of which require no specific description here. On a pair of cross-braces 14, a motor 18 may be supported within the confines of plates 10, here being shown carried upon a platform 14 at the lower portions of the plates.

Through a shaft 18 and a system of pulleys and belts, the motor transmits power to rotate a pulley 20, and through that pulley, a shaft 22 extending transversely between plates 10 at the upper end of the frame.

Shaft 22 carries a polygonal pulley or pulleys 24 between the plates, over which is carried a belt 26 which is stretched down to and around a bottom pulley or pulleys 28 similar in construction to pulley 24. Suitable means, such as adjustable bearings 30, may be provided for pulley 28 to adjust the tension on the belt. The bearings may be supported in a carriage 32, the position of which may be fixed with relation to the frame by means of bolts 34 extended through slots 36 in plates 10 and engaging against the .5 plates to retain the carriage against movement.

Preferably cooperating with the belt at its lower end there is associated with the frame a hopperdefining structure 38. Immediately above that structure may be disposed a receiving pan 40.

;I Between the hopper structure and the top end of the top surface of the belt may be disposed wiping fingers 42. At the top end of the belt coin-separating element 44 cooperates with the belt as it turns around pulley 24; element 44 Sdischarges onto coin-assorting chutes 46. The coin-assorting chutes are provided with a plurality of openings through which the coins are precipitated onto guides 48 for collection in containers 50 after proper assortment takes place. 0 Coins delivered to the apparatus are deposited upon receiving pan 40, the bottom of which may have a plurality of openings 52 formed there, through. The diameter of such openings may be made slightly smaller than that of the smallest coin to be asssorted by the apparatus. Disks smaller than those to be assorted by the apparatus and dirt, falling through these openings, are received in a removable receptacle 54 located beneath the receiving pan. Receptacle 54, by a pair of pins 56 in its end walls, received in slots 58 in plates 10, is removable at will to dispose of the debris. The bottom of the receptacle, at edge 69, may rest on a shoulder 62 defined in wall E4 provided for that purpose. Receiving pan 40 - itself is pivoted upon the frame, for moving it to upraised position when coins thereon will be dumped into the hopper defined by plates 10 and structure 38.

The hopper-defining structure includes wall 64, shown in Figs. 12 and 13, having an upstanding baffle-defining section 66, which, by suitable securing means, may serve to retain the wall in fixed relation to the frame. The wall may include, in addition to the portion defining shoulder 62, or as an integral part of that portion, an angularly downwardly directed, pocket-forming element 68. The element includes a face disposed at an angle to top surface 72 of the belt. A pocket 74 is thus formed, the pocket tapering with the taper of face 70 toward its lowest point, as seen from Figs. 1 and 13. Face 70 then merges into another face 76 disposed substantially parallel to the plane of movement of surface 72 and closely adjacent that surface, in fact close enough that no coin may slip between ,110 5 surface 72 and face 76. In this manner, but a single coin at a time may get down to the very bottom of the pocket at any point, and none may get beyond face 70.

A plurality of partitions 78 may be extended from face 70 downwardly toward surface 72, coming into as close relationship to surface 72 as possible without creating a frictional drag on the belt. Recesses 80, defined in the belt, are arranged in substantially parallel lines, extending longitudinally of the belt. The partitions serve to separate, within pockets 74, each line from the other, and thereby, each recess from the other. Thus but a single coin may assume a position immediately over a recess within the confines of the pocket at any time in the operation of the machine. Partitions 78 are so disposed, and their edges are so sharply defined that, as the belt moves upwardly, the tendency of coins to remain in a position between compartments 82 of pocket 74 resting against an edge of a partition, will be overcome, the coins tending to slide laterally and gravitate into a compartment and thus into a recess.

Each recess 80 may have a substantially circular formation, its diameter being large enough to receive flat against its bottom 84 the largest coin to be assorted, but not large enough to reseive on that bottom any two coins. The belt may be made up of a plurality of sections 86, each 80 substantially identical in construction. To simplify the construction of the sections, each may include a plate 88 and a strap 90. Both plate and strap may be stampings, and preferably are so manufactured for cheapness and efficiency. 85 Each strap has its opposed longitudinal edges 92 and 94 defined by a series of substantially semi-circular cut-outs 96 and 98, respectively.

Each strap is secured to the top surface of a plate so that two sections, thus constituted and brought together into edge-to-edge relationship, through the cooperation of a pair of cut-outs 96 and 98, and the top surface of the plate define a recess 80.

While the width of strap 90 may be substantially the same as that of plate 88, and for certain purposes, the edge boundaries of strap and plate may be made coextensive, still certain specific results are attained by disposing the edges of the strap not in the same line as the edges of the plate. For instance, prongs 100 between 50 cut-outs 98 extend beyond edge 102 of the plate upon which that strap is assembled, while prongs 104 terminate short of edge 106. In this manner, the distance from the rear-most portion 108 of cut-out 96 to edge 106 is more than half the entire width of the recess 80 finally formed by cooperation of the two cut-outs. The center of each semi-circle defining a cut-out is removed from edge 102 or 106, as the case may be, and each cut-out 96 now includes, in addition to its own semi-circular extent, a portion which will be enclosed by prongs 100 when the sections are brought together and they are in proper relation to prongs 104, as shown in Figs. 3 and 4.

The edges 102 and 106 of each plate may be formed for interlocking engagement, as, for instance, by means of a series of teeth 110 and related notches 112, the teeth of one edge being received in the related notches of the other edge. The extent of each individual tooth and notch is such that, when the edges of a pair of sections, the plates of which are so formed, are interlocked, the extent of the crevices between plates will, at no time, be greater, and, in fact, in all cases, will be less than the diameter of any coin to be handled by the apparatus. By this arrangement, while the sections are disposed in flat condition, there is no possibility that a coin, if it should get to an upright position, as within the hopper, may fall through a crevice or slit 114 formed between adjacent sections 86.

Strap 90 may have the edge defining cut-outs 98 stamped or otherwise worked or formed to project upwardly above the normal surface of the strap to delineate for each cut-out a belled edge I1G, extending above the surface of the strap. Thus, if a pair of coins happen to assume the relationship shown in dotted lines in Fig. 4, that is, in which two coins, in the same recess, are in edge-to-edge contact, one of the coins, due to the fact that the recess can receive only a single coin fiat against bottom 84, must be supported on edge 116, and thus have an extending edge 18 raised sharply above the surface of the strap.

For economy of space, the recess-forming cutouts are positioned as closely adjacent each other as possible. However, on each prong 100 there will appear end portions of two belled edges, between which a groove 120 will be formed. This groove is of sufficient extent to permit the belt to slide past partitions 18, which, if desired, may, for this purpose, extend below the level of face 76, providing an auxiliary face, the coaction of partition and groove, to some extent, serving, where desired, together with the side plates, for guiding the belt to bring the recesses into proper relation to coin-separating element 44.

3 Wiping fingers 42 are supported from a framework 124, either made a part of, or in any suitable manner secured to frame F. Preferably, the framework is secured to a pair of end plates 126 extending upwardly from and secured to the inner faces of plates 10 and themselves functioning, together with associated straps 128, secured beneath the belt and spaced vertically from the ends of plates 126, to form grooves through which the edges of the belt sections are 4constantly guided. The belt is thus retained against any vibration and in a substantially fixed plane of movement. Efficient operation was found to result when the inclination of the belt was in the neighborhood of 500 to the horizontal.

Framework 124 itself and rods 130 carried there5by for pivotally mounting the fingers are spaced above the belt a distance sufficient that any one coin intended to be assorted by this apparatus may roll downwardly, on its edge, along 5 the belt without interference from any part of the framework. Upon rods 130, which are carried in lugs 132, provided as part of the framework, are pivoted, for individual movement without affecting others, arms 134. In the structural arrangement here disclosed, two rods 130 are provided; each rod has a set of such arms. Each line of recesses, extending longitudinally of the belt, has at least one arm. Arms pivoted on the same rod are, desirably, spaced from each 85 other to leave between adjacent arms at least one line of recesses not affected by an arm pivoted on that same rod. The arms affecting such intermediate line or lines are then arranged on the other rod.

The arms are preferably formed with pivot bearings at one end, while the other end is enlarged to provide a wiper head 136. This head, as shown in Figs. 2, 14, 15 and 16, provides an edge face 138, which, as the face 140 of head 76 136 normally rests, under the gravitational force of the arm, upon the belt, is at a sharp angle to the longitudinal center-line of the recess with which that finger is to cooperate. The head, including vertically extending face 138 for engaging coins in the manner to be indicated, as the belt moves beneath the head, will engage against any coin jutting above belled edge 116, or, in any other manner, projecting into its path.

Due to the angular disposition of this edge, the coin will be impelled laterally. When properly associated, this sidewise camming function will result in removal of excess coins to a position intermediately of adjacent recesses, where the coin will be freed and permitted to gravitate downwardly along the belt, between the recesses and into the mass in the hopper, all without affecting the coins, properly deposited or retained in recesses. During the sidewise camming, no appreciable pressure acts upon the other coin in the recess. At the same time, the 2( coin acted upon is caught between the fingerface and any other surface so that the coin will smoothly, and without catching, slide laterally out of the undesired condition. The angular arrangement of face 140 also disposes a wall 142 21 on the up-grade side of the finger. Coins, released from above that particular finger and travelling down along the belt, will be deflected by that wall to a path between, rather than over, lines of coins properly retained in the recesses. 31 The arms are constructed especially for the purpose of breaking up any combination where two coins assume a position within the same recess. These fingers ride over belled edges 118 as the belt moves upwardly, and are thereby 31 raised slightly above the true level of strap 90.

The pointed end 144 of each arm is thus protected against possible engagement with cutout 99 which might damage either cut-out or arm. The lifting of the arm away from the surface of the plate will not lessen the efficiency of the apparatus as either the belled edge itself will have positioned the extra coin for engagement by the cam faces, or, where two coins are positioned one on top of the other, the rise of the finger over the belled edge will not permit the finger to clear the superposed coin. This is due to the fact that the thickness of strap 90 is just sufficient, at portion 108, to engage and retain the edge of any coin, but not sufficient to extend up to the top face of any coin, while the level of belled edge 116 is less than the height of any two superimposed coins to be handled by the apparatus.

As the belt arrives at pulley 24 and then commences its rotation around that pulley, sections 86, which are retained for relative pivoting movement by such means as hinges 143, will pivot relatively, leaving an open slot or crack 148 and producing an angularly formed member, as seen a in Figs. 1, 7, 8 and 9. Pins !58, which may be made a part of, or otherwise assembled with polygonal pulley 24, will enter openings 152 and project through the openings beyond bottom 84, as shown in Figs. 7, 8 and 9, causing movement f of a coin 154 to a tilted position away from the bottom. Any adhesive contact of coin and plate will be broken. To reduce the effects, and thereby the possibility of adhesion, openings 152 may be provided in as large a number as desired to 1 relieve bottom 84 of as much surface of contact as possible, although the number of pins 150 may remain limited to one for each section-recess position.

Now, as section 86 moves to the position shown I in Fig. 9, a number of different relationships may arise. In the case of a small coin 56, such as the dime, the coin is continuously retained by, and does not extend beyond, the shelf provided by the plate and teeth 110. Opening 158, between belt and coin-separating element 44, as a danger to an over-balanced coin, requires no consideration as the coin, hugging the rear wall of cut-out 96, and made to do so by frictional wiping of face 140, LO will have no such force acting on it. As the section continues to turn further toward the vertical position, an angle will finally be reached when the coin will tend to slide off onto the coinseparating member. That angle closely approxi5 mates the frictional angle, and the finger 160 of the pronged edge 162 of the coin-separating element may accordingly be located to receive the coin in that position under normal circumstances.

Where, for some reason, as continued adhesive !0 contact, the coin does not properly separate from the belt and discharge onto coin-separating element 44, finger 160, as section 86 rotates into position, engages in one notch 164 of notches 112. The finger comes upon the coin from below, ;5 as shown in Fig. 9, prying it loose and compelling it to assume a position on the coin-separating element. Tooth 166, normally cooperating with notch 164, is shown cut away into an inclined surface to facilitate the entrance of finger 160 0 into the notch and not to interfere with the rotation of the belt around the pulley, as indicated by the line of clearance 168 for finger 160. The finger is likewise bevelled off to facilitate this cooperation.

5 Where a large coin such as the half dollar is carried in a recess, the construction of the recess is such that, even in the position of Fig. 9, the possibility of overbalancing is eliminated. Since the rear-most edge of cut-out 96 is more than half the diameter of any coin to be handled by the apparatus, behind edge 106, more than half the coin will be retained upon that portion of the plate enclosed by cut-out 96, as shown in Fig. 9.

To assure that this relationship shall exist in all cases, fingers 42 may be positioned, as shown in dotted lines in Fig. 3, so that the upper extremity 170 of face 140 will be in a line displaced laterally toward the center-line of the recess, and away from the line tangent to the recess paralleling the direction of movement of the belt. In this construction, belled edge 116 will move beyond extremity 170 and permit face 140 to be brought down against a coin 172 within the recess while in a position such as shown in the drawings. Face 140 will thus become effective to drag the coin back along the plate until it abuts the rear edge 108. As indicated herein, the thickness of strap 90 being less than that of any coin to be handled by the apparatus, the face will be retained out of possibility of engagement with edge 108 as the face, as appears from the drawings, is of such extent that, at all times, it will ride either upon belled edge 116 or upon the top face of the strap, or upon a coin in the recess.

Also, as an additional protection against overbalancing of coins carried upon the plate in that portion defined by a cut-out 96, teeth l10 and their associated notches 112 at edges 106 may be lengthened to form a table for properly supporting the coin.

Now, after the sections move beyond the relationship shown in Fig. 9, the section marked 174 will approach the position previously attained by the section marked 176, its angular position finally becoming substantially the angle of the coefficient of friction. The coin will then commence sliding off the plate but, by that time, the coin will have been brought immediately over the edge 162 of coin-separating element 44, upon which it will discharge, such discharge being completed „ before belt and separating element are in the relationship indicated in Fig. 8, where a coin might be thrown down slot or opening 158.

During discharge of a coin by the action of the coin-separating member in the manner indicated, a positive upward pressure will be applied to the coin at its forward edge by finger If80. The coin will now bridge across between finger and the plate from which it is being removed, and will be brought from a sharp, downwardly sloping position to the plane of bottom 178, or, in the case of larger coins, to the plane determined as indicated in Figs. 10, 11, 22 and 23. By, in effect, lifting the forward edge of the coin, the tendency of the rear edge to fall forward, as the coin is deposited on the coin-separating element, and thereafter to turn end over end, down the groove of the chute, or to roll down the chute on its end, with possible inaccuracy in the assortment of coins, is entirely counteracted.

The separating element includes a plurality of spaced apart walls 180 extending from bottom 178 upwardly substantially at right angles thereto. The walls are spaced apart a distance such that any coin within the limits to be handled by 80 the apparatus with the possible exception of the lrgest coin, as here the half-dollar, will be deposited on the element substantially flat against bottom 178. An inclined plane 182, a part of each wall, restricts the dimensions of bottom I78 between the walls, the plane, if by chance a coin should be incorrectly positioned laterally, effecting a lifting of one edge of the coin as it slides under gravitational effort. That lift, and the continued sliding of the coin, will be sufficient to impel the coin laterally until one edge comes into 40 abutment with the vertical face 183 of the associated wall, when, except in the case of the single large coin, the coin will be substantially flat against the bottom. The single large coin, for which no assorting opening in the chute need be 45 provided as it may be treated as a final discard, will continue to ride with a small portion of its face upon incline 182, although its edge, as the edges of all the other coins, will be forced into the angle formed by the intersection of vertical 50 face 183 and bottom 178.

The separating element, in discharging its coins into chute 46, thus delivers the largest coin or half-dollar tilted. The top edge passes off the coin, when finally brought up to position, rides 55 off incline 182 along a portion 184 of uniform level, which portion, at the end of the element, guides the coin over to rest against a prong 18S which may be formed as an integral part of the chute. In the specific structure here shown, the chute is made from an angle section 188 to one leg 190 of which, at or adjacent its extremity, a bar 192 is affixed in any well known manner. By this means, a channel is defined with prong 186 5 appearing as an integral portion of bar 192.

Where chutes are positioned substantially as shown, that is, wall 194 of one chute is immediately against bar 192 of the next adjacent chute, wall 194 may be cut away to permit the proper relationship of prong 186 for the purposes indicated, sufficient of wall 194 remaining, or a strap 196 being located in the chute, to retain the bottom end of the coin, as shown in Fig. 10.

Since, as the coin passes from portion 184, no obstruction, even as much as a fine edge, should be interposed, prong 186 is moved slightly away from the discharging edge of portion 184. Prong 183 may be struck out of the bar by cutting an inclined plane 198 at the upper end thereof and then, by a kerf 200 or similar means, by bending the remaining metal laterally into the position of Fig. 24. In this manner, substantially stockbar metal may be used, and expensive machining of a long strip of metal is eliminated.

The large coin, after being guided by the prong, which also may have an inclined upper face 202 to raise the coin gradually, is received against face 204 inclined inwardly toward the chute. This face is of such dimensions that the coin, resting against it and with an edge constantly in angle 206 between wall 194 and leg 191, will extend above bar 192 and ride down the chute without any substantial change in its ango gular position.

As shown in Figs. 2 and 10, walls 180 extend down the slope of the element paralleling substantially the slope of the element, that is, the line along which a member, under normal gravi26 tational force, would be impelled. Face 183 of the wall is positioned to be aligned with or otherwise -to provide a smoothly flowing communication with wall 194, which may be the other leg of the angle or, for certain purposes, strap 196, hereinafter to be described.

Wall !94, however, deviates from the path defined by wall 180 to the extent that its angle will be interposed not only to react against the pressure of the coin tending to slide off face 204, but 36 also to compel the coin to move al6ng a path angularly displaced from the true gravitational path or slope of the chute, sufficiently that the coin edge will continuously contact with the walls at the angle throughout the further movement of the coin down the chute. This function was found to be properly effectuated where the chute deviated but 80' from the normal slope of the chute, where that slope was 65° from the horizontal.

The end of bar 192 at inclined plane 198 is of 4some thickness; however, by positioning bottom 1 78, at the point of communication of element and chute, slightly above bottom 208 and above or in line with the beginning edge of plane 198, the coin, travelling from element to chute, will 6commence its movement down the chute with one edge upon the plane and the other edge falling down upon bottom 208. This slight tilting movement assists in initiating the sliding moveSment of coins with relation to face 204 upon which they now tend to dispose themselves.

Such sliding movement naturally forces an edge of a coin into angle 206.

Coins, such as the quarter, will continue in contact with plane 198 continuously until its top edge is reached. Then it will glide along face 204. Other coins, such as dimes, pennies and nickels, after moving slightly along the plane, will assume the tilted condition, one face being 5 in contact with the sharp line intersection 210 between plane 198 and face 204. Continued movement of the coins down the chute causes the increase of their tilt until the edge arrives at the proper height, when the edge will then move into contact only with face 204. As shown in Figs. 19 to 22, inclusive, face 204 is disposed so that its contact with the coin edge is practically that of point to point. At the lower end of the coin, practically but two points are in contact.

T7 Frictional resistance to movement is thus cut to a sharp minimum. The relationship of a dime to face 204 is shown in Fig. 19, of a penny, in Fig. 20, of a nickel, in Fig. 21, of a quarter-dollar, in Fig. 22, and of a half-dollar, in Fig. 23.

In all of these cases, the coin is supported practically at only three points. At the same time, the angle of tilt is merely sufficient to remove any substantial portion of a face of the coin from contact with a surface of the chute. In the construction shown, the tilt was approxi- 1C mately 300. By such slight tilt, the distance from which the coin must rotate when spilled into its proper opening is small, and the assorting movement, therefore, quickly completed.

Face 204 is cut away in different degrees at it different sections. Three different levels for the face are bound at the cut-outs 212, 214 and 216.

In addition to cutting short face 204 at each of the cut-outs, the bar is undercut at each of these cut-outs. For instance, while, at cut-out 2( 212 the distance between wall 194 and face 204 is greater than the diameter of a dime, but less than that of the penny, an undercut shoulder 218 permits free downward movement of the dime when, in moving down the chute, it comes to 21 cut-out 212, and its ultimate precipitation through opening 220 in the chute bottom, after which a proper guide will deliver the coin to its proper container. The position of the coin immediately before precipitation is as small an an- 31 gle to the bottom of the chute as possible so that, immediately after passing the position of face 204 supporting it, the coin will speedily pass through the opening without first necessarily twisting through any considerable space. For 31 this reason, the portion of bottom between wall 1S4 and the opening has practically no effect on the rotation of the coin into. the opening. When the liberated edge of the coin is about to pass into the opening, this bottom portion will, in 4 fact, impart an upward kick to the coin edge leaving it, so that its discharge may be fully completed.

In like manner, cut-out 214 and its undercut shoulder 222 are formed for proper discharge of 4 a penny through a related opening 224. Cutout 216 and its undercut shoulder 226 are intended to initiate the precipitation of the nickel toward opening 228.

In this relation, it is to be noted that coins 5 at the top of the chute move much slower and gain momentum under gravitational action as they move down the chute. The distance required, therefore, for completion of its rotation, after arriving at cut-out 212, for precipitation of 5 the dime into its opening 220, may be made proportionately smaller than that for the penny into opening 224, the penny, moving with greater and increasing velocity, requiring this greater distance properly to complete its rotation. For this reason, in each case, cut-outs 212, 2 4 and 216 are positioned somewhat in advance of their respective openings 220, 224, and 228, as the momentum of the coin will, in each case, carry it beyond the particular one of the boundary walls 230, 232 and 234 into the proper opening.

In assorting pennies, dimes and nickels, owing to their close approach in diametrical dimensions, and even in the dimensions of their thickness, the fact that slight flattening at the edges of either dime or penny may make that coin of the same effect as penny or nickel, respectively, is a problem overcome by this apparatus. For this purpose, the chute-width defining function of wall 194, at least from the coin-separating element down to a position just adjacent opening 228, may be performed by strap 196, secured to wall 194 in any suitable manner. The strap is spaced from bottom 208 sufficiently to define a groove 236, this groove, as seen in Figs. 19, 20 and 21, being bevelled and tapered inwardly. Coins, mutilated as indicated by flattening, will have their edges reduced in thickness to increase their diametrical dimensions, forming fins 238. As the mutilated coin moves down the chute, at some point in its rolling movement, the fin, being less in thickness than the normal coin, and the groove being properly dimensioned to exclude coins of proper thickness, will seat within the groove. The lengths of the respective openings 220 and 224, for dimes and pennies, are, in relation to this function of the apparatus, respectively, long enough to permit the coin to roll on its edge the distance of its circumference, to permit any fin, wherever on the periphery of the coin it may be located, to come to position within the groove. The effect of the enlarged coin diameter is thus eliminated, the depth of the groove being properly dimensioned for that purpose; the cooperation of the coin will then take place with the chute as if the coin were of normal diameter, and assortment will be in the proper opening.

While bar 192 could be continued to the termination of the chute to complete the'assortment of the nickels, quarters and half-dollars, for certain purposes, it is desired to terminate the rod with cut-out 216 and undercut shoulder 226, which are just immediately above opening 228.

Beyond the bar, a cast member 240 is secured to angle section 188, continuing, in so far as its top face 242, the functioning of face 204 for guiding half-dollars. Since the nickels, quarters and half-dollars are greatly divergent both in thickness and diameter, strap 196 and its accompanySing groove 236 may be eliminated from the section of the chute to handle these coins. The stepping of the quarter back against wall 194, after release from strap 196, is made ineffectual to cause precipitation of that coin through opening 228, immediately at that point, by a projection 244 from member 240, extending inwardly over opening 228.

This projection also has functions in connection with the fact that coins such as the nickel and quarter will have become endowed with considerable momentum when they have travelled to this position. In the case of the nickel, momentum may have become so great that the coin might fly across its opening 228, over boundary wall 245 and through opening 246, provided for quarter-dollars. To anticipate this possibility, projection 244 includes a cam surface 248, as its bottom face. The surface will be in line to engage the nickel, rotating downwardly after clearing cut-out 216, turning the nickel sharply downwardly into opening 228.

Top face 242 is relieved further inwardly than cut-out 216 so that the quarter will begin its rotation immediately on passing to member 240.

Projection 244 is relieved at its upper surface into a downwardly inclined plane 250, to permit this fall away of the quarter. A projection 252 extends from member 240 immedaitely below projection 244, the projection having a cam surface 254 cooperating with quarters falling along plane 250, to drive the quarter through its opening 246.

Half-dollars will roll off the chute, after continuing to the end of face 242. In this manner, all the coins are properly assorted and separated into individual containers.

The operation of the apparatus will be clear from the above description. Summarizing, it is noted that coins deposited upon pan 40 and after separation of undesired elements, are dumped into hopper-defining structure 38. From that position, belt 26 separates them into individual charges by the cooperation of the recess formation and of the wiping fingers. At the top of the belt, the coins are separated from the belt by element 44 and transmitted to chutes 46. Gliding down the chutes, the coins, in accordance with their denominations, are precipitated through openings 220, 224, 228 and 246 or off the end of the chute, being delivered down guides 48 into proper receptacles 50. MVany other changes could be effected in the particular apparatus designed, and in the methods of operation set forth, and in specific details thereof, without substantially departing from the invention intended to be defined in the claims, the specific description being merely to illustrate an operative embodiment capable of carrying out the spirit of the invention.

What is claimed as new and useful is: 1. A conveyor belt for disks, the belt being designed for use in a machine to separate a mass of the disks into unit charges, the belt consisting of a plurality of sections connected together at adjacent edges, each section consisting of a flat plate having superposed thereon a member provided with a plurality of cut-outs at each edge of the member, the sections being constructed so that, when laid in edge-to-edge abutting relation, the cut-outs at the abutted edges will define closed recesses upon the plates. 2. A conveyor belt for disks, the belt being designed for use in a machine to separate a mass of the disks into unit charges, the belt consisting of a plurality of sections connected together at adjacent edges, each section consisting of a fiat plate having superposed thereon a member provided with a plurality of cut-outs at each edge of the member, the sections being constructed so that, when laid in edge-to-edge abutting relation, the cut-outs at the abutted edges will define closed recesses upon the plates, the edges of the plates being formed with a plurality of indentations associated with the cut-outs, the indentations being so proportioned that any portion of an edge of the plate extending continuously in the same direction and associated with any cut-out shall be less than the diameter of any disk to be handled by the belt.

3. A conveyor belt for disks, the belt being designed for use in a machine to separate a mass of the disks into unit charges, the belt consisting of a plurality of sections, each section consisting of a flat plate having superposed thereon a member provided with a plurality of cut-outs at each edge of the member, the sections being constructed so that, when laid in edge-to-edge abutting relation, the cut-outs at the abutted edges will define closed recesses upon the plates, the -edges of the plates being formed with a plurality of indentations to form a plurality of prongs, the prongs at the edge of one plate being interlocked with the prongs at the edge of the next adjacent plate and the interlocked prongs cooperating with the cut-outs so that the length of a single, continuous, unidirectional portion of the slit between an associated recess-forming pair of cut-outs shall be less than the diameter of any disk to be handled by the conveyor, the plates being connected at their adjacent edges for pivoting movement with relation to each ot'her. T7 4. In combination, an endless belt comprising a plurality of flat plate members connected together for angular movement with relation to each other, the members having recesses defined g thereon for reception of disks therein, each recess being dimensioned to receive flat against the bottom thereof but a single disk within the dimensions of disks to be transported by the belt, the wall of the recess in the direction in which the belt is to be moved being constructed to displace additional disks to extend obliquely upwardly away from the face of the belt.

5. In combination, an endless belt comprising a plurality of flat plate members connected together for movement with relation to each other, the members having recesses defined thereon for reception of disks therein, each recess being dimensioned to receive flat against the bottom thereof but a single disk within the dimensions of disks to be transported by the belt, the wall of the recess in the direction in which the belt is to be moved extending above the surface of the member in which that portion of the recess is formed, and a wiper having an edge cooperating with the face of the belt, the edge engaging and displacing any additional disks which may build up a combination by assuming a position upon a disk properly positioned on the bottom of the recess, the edge riding up upon the raised wall and rising above and out of coacting relation to any disk properly positioned within a recess, the length of the wall being sufficient to maintain the edge in raised position until the the disk in the recess has been brought directly beneath a5 that portion of the wiper.

6. In combination, an endless belt comprising a plurality of flat sections connected together for angular movement with relation to each other, the sections each consisting of a flat strip and a cut-out strip, the cut-out strip being disposed upon one face of the flat strip, sections located in immediate adjacency producing, by the cooperation of their cut-out strips, a plurality of recesses for reception of disks therein, each recess being dimensioned to receive upon the portions of the flat strip left free by cooperating cut-outs but a single disk within the dimensions of disks to be transported by the belt, each cut-out strip having one of its recessforming edges disposed to extend above the level of its other recess-forming edge.

7. In combination, an endless belt comprising a plurality of flat sections connected together for angular movement with relation to each other, the sections each consisting of a flat strip and a cut-out strip, the cut-out strip being disposed upon one face of the flat strip, sections located in immediate adjacency producing, by the cooperation of their cut-out strips, a plurality of circular recesses for reception of disks therein, each recess being dimensioned to receive upon the portions of the flat strip left free by cooperating cut-outs but a single disk within the dimensions of disks to be transported by the' belt, each cut-out strip having portions of one of its recess-forming edges disposed to extend above the level of its other recess-forming edge, a pair of cut-outs in adjacent strips being required to form a recess, each cut-out strip being located so that its higher edge projects over an edge of the flat strip.

8. In combination, an endless belt comprising a plurality of flat sections connected together for angular movement with relation to each other, the sections each consisting of a flat strip and a cut-out strip, the cut-out strip being disposed upon one face of the flat strip, sections located in immediate adjacency producing, by the cooperation of their cut-out strips, a plurality of recesses for reception of disks therein, each recess being dimensioned to receive upon the portions of the flat strip left free by cooperating cut-outs but a single disk within the dimensions of disks to be transported by the belt, each recess-defining portion of the flat strip ic having a plurality of portions of its surface relieved to leave but limited portions thereof for contact with a disk supported in the recess, some of the relieved portions consisting of openings extending through the flat strip, a pulley for lr engaging the belt to move it into. its various positions, and pins on the pulley for extension through an opening at each recess to dislodge disks seated within the recesses.

9. In a coin conveying apparatus, a belt for 2C use in separating a mass of coins into individual charges of single coins, the belt comprising a plurality of sections, the sections being retained in association so that they may be arranged flat with longitudinal edges of pairs a of sections substantially in juxtaposition, the sections being capable of relative hinging movement with relation to each other to separate the edges from the juxtaposed relationship, portions of two adjacent sections at the juxtaposed edges 3; being formed to provide a plurality of coin-receiving recesses, the juxtaposed edges being formed to provide a non-rectilinear slit between adjacent sections.

10. In a coin-conveying apparatus, a belt for use in separating a mass of coins into individual charges of single coins, the belt comprising a plurality of sections, the sections being retained in association so that they may be arranged flat with longitudinal edges of pairs of sections substantially in juxtaposition, the sections being capable of relative hinging movement with relation to each other to separate the edges from the juxtaposed relationship, portions of two adjacent sections at the juxtaposed edges being formed to provide a plurality of coin-receiving recesses, the juxtaposed edges being formed to provide a non-rectilinear slit between adjacent sections, and means for receiving coins from the belt, the receiving means being formed to cooperate with one of the slit-defining edges after the sections have been hingedly moved out of the flat relationship.

11. In a coin-conveying apparatus, a belt for use in separating a mass of coins into individual charges of single coins, the belt comprising a plurality of sections, the sections being retained in association so that they may be arranged flat with longitudinal edges of pairs of sections substantially in juxtaposition, the sections being capable of relative hinging movement with relation to each other to separate the edges from the juxtaposed relationship, portions of two adjacent sections at the juxtaposed edges being constructed to define a plurality of coin-receiving recesses, the juxtaposed edges being formed to provide a non-rectilinear slit between adjacent sections, and means for receiving coins from the belt, the receiving means having an edge formed to cooperate with one of the slitdefining edges after the sections have been hingedly moved out of the flat relationship, the edge of the receiving means including an extended prong, and an indentation cut in the edge of a recess-forming section and the associated section being cut-away at that point to permit the prong to enter- beneath a coin retained in- a recess and cause- it to be raised at an angle to the bottom of the recess.

12. Apparatus for conveying- disks of various sizes for- assorting- into groups all: of- which in a group are of substantially the same size, the apparatus including a conveyor belt for moving the disks to a predetermined elevation, the belt having a plurality of disk-receiving: depressions, and a supply hopper cooperating with the conveyor, the supply hopper including a pocket extending downwardly along the conveyor and tapering downwardly to-an end portion; the end [5 portion- of the tapered pocket beingg of a dimension such that only a single disk can at any instant be positioned at any point in the portion, each: of the depressions having means- cooperating with an adjacent wall of the- pocket for ex10 pelling from the end portion disks not seated within the depressions; 13. Apparatus for conveying a. promiscuous collection of disks for assorting into distinct groups according to their size; the sorting op!5 eration being a function of gravitational action, the apparatus including means for raising the disks to a predetermined level,.the raising means including a travelling surface having a plurality of disk-receiving recesses formed therein, 0 each recess being dimensioned to receive one disk of any size within the limits of operation of the apparatus but no combination of two or more of said disks, each recess having a boundary edge shaped to cause excess disks not flat 5 against the bottom of the recess to-be biased sharply at an angle to the raising means, and means to sweep out of that relationship any disk on the raising means not wholly within: a recess 0 14. A conveyor belt for disks, the belt, when a mass of disks is deposited thereon and the belt is moved relatively to the mass, being designed to cooperate for the separation of the mass into unit charges, the belt consisting of a plurality 5 of sections, each section being substantially flat and having delineated thereon depressed areas at its edge; the sections:being constructed so that, when laid in edge-to-edge abutting relation, the depressed areas at abutted edges will define Sclosed recesses upon the belt.

15. A conveyor belt for disks, the belt, when a mass of disks is deposited thereon and the belt is moved relatively to the mass, being designed to cooperate for the separation of the mass into 5 unit charges, the belt consisting of a plurality of sections, each section being substantially flat and having delineated thereon depressed areas at its edge, the sections being constructed so that, when laid in edge-to-edge abutting relation, the de) pressed areas at abutted edges will define closed recesses upon the belt, the abutted edges being non-rectilinear and, when in abutment, providing susbtantially a closed surface for the belt top, the line of abutment being continuous in the same straight line at no point for a distance greater than the diameter of any disk to be handled by the belt.

16. A conveyor belt for disks, the belt, when a mass of disks is deposited thereon and the belt is moved relatively to the mass, being designed to cooperate for the separation of the mass into unit charges, the belt consisting of a plurality of sections, each section being substantially fiat and having delineated thereon depressed areas at its edge, the sections being constructed so that, when laid in- edge-to-edge abutting relation, the depressed areas at abutted edges will define closed recesses, upon the: belti the abutted edges being non-rectilinear, the sections being connected for hinging movement: with relation to each other, into,,andaout:of edge-abutting relation the edges, when the sections are hingedly moved so that their top surfaces'define a continuous plane, moving into-abutment and providing substantially an unbroken-surface for the belt top. 'to 17 A-.conveyor belt for disks, the belt, when a mass ofi disks is: deposited thereon and the belt is moved relatively to the mass, being designed to cooperate for the separation of the mass into unit charges; the belt consisting of a plurality of sections, each section. being substantially flat and having delineated thereon, depressed areas at its edge, the-sections being- constructed so that, when laid: in edge-to-edge abutting relation, the depressed areas:at: abutted edges will define closed '20 recesses upon the belt, the abutted edges being cut: out to provide prongs, the sections being connected, for hinging movement with relation to each other, into :and:out of edge-abutting relation the edges,, whenthe sections are hingedly moved '5 so that: their top surfaces define a continuous plane, moving into abutment and the prongs and cut-outs.interlocking to provide: substantially an unbroken surface for the belt; top, the edges of cut-outs and prongs being continuous in the same straight line at no point for a, distance greater than. the diameter of any disk to be handled by the:belt.

18. A belt having a substantially planar surface, the belt having a plurality of recesses defined in said' surface for the reception of disks therein- each recess being dimensioned to receive flat against: the bottom thereof but a single disk within the dimensions of disks to be transported by the belt, the surface of the belt immediately at the wall of the recess in the direction in which the belt is to be moved being sloped upwardly out of the plane of the belt. 19. A belt having a. substantially planar surface, the belt: having a plurality of recesses defined'in said surface for the reception of disks therein; each recess- being- dimensioned to receive flat against the bottom thereof but a single disk within the dimensions of disks to be transported by the belt, the surface of the belt immediately at the wall of the recess in the direction in which the belt is to be moved being sloped upwardly out of the plane of the belt and up to the edge of the recess, the normal depth of each recess other than at said wall being less than the thickness of any disk to be transported by the belt, the depth of the recess at the edge defined by the upwardly sloped belt surface being less than the combined thicknesses of any pair of disks to be transported by the belt but greater than the thickness of any such single disk.

20. In combination, a belt having a substantially planar surface, the belt having a plurality of recesses formed in said surface for the reception of disks therein, each recess being dimensioned to receive flat against the bottom thereof but a single disk within the dimensions of disks to be transported by the belt, the surface of the belt immediately at the wall of the recess in the direction in which the belt is to be moved being sloped upwardly out of the plane of the belt surface, and means normally resting upon and sliding over the surface for clearing the surface of disks not disposed flat against the bottom of a recess, the clearing means riding upon and over the upwardly sloped surface.

21. In combination, a belt having a substantially planar surface, the belt having a plurality of recesses formed in said surface for the reception of disks therein, each recess being dimensioned to receive flat against the bottom thereof but a single disk within the dimensions of disks to be transported by the belt, the surface of the belt immediately at the wall of the recess in the direction in which the belt is to be moved being sloped upwardly out of the plane of the belt surface and up to the edge of the recess, the normal depth of each recess being less than the thickness of any disk to be transported by the belt, the depth of the recess at the edge defined by the upwardly sloped belt surface being less than the combined thickness of any pair of disks to be transported by the belt but being greater than the thickness of any such single disk, and means normally resting upon and sliding over the surface for clearing the surface of disks not disposed flat against the bottom of a recess, the clearing means being moved by an associated upwardly sloped surface out of engaging relation to a disk properly positioned within the recess.

22. In combination, an endless belt comprising a plurality of flat sections connected together for angular movement with relation to each other, the sections each consisting of a flat strip, and a cut-out strip, the cut-out strip being disposed upon one face of the flat strip, sections located in immediate adjacency producing, by the cooperation of their cut-out strips, a plurality of circular recesses for reception of disks therein, the recesses being dimensioned to receive upon the portions of the flat strips left free by cooperating cutouts but a single disk within the dimensions of disks to be transported by the belt, each cut-out strip having one of its recess-forming edges to extend to an elevation above the level of its other recess-forming edge, a pair of cut-outs of adjacent strips being required to form a recess, each cut-out strip being located so that the edge having the higher elevation projects beyond an edge of its associated flat strip, whereby even the disk of the largest type to be handled by the belt may be stably retained in a recess without overbalancing even after the immediately adjacent section and its cut-out strip has been swung away from recess-forming position.

23. In combination, an endless belt comprising a a plurality of flat sections connected together for angular movement with relation to each other, the sections each consisting of a flat strip, and a cut-out strip, the cut-out strip being disposed upon one face of the flat strip, sections located 1( in immediate adjacency producing, by the cooperation of their cut-out strips, a plurality of recesses for reception of disks therein, the recesses being dimensioned to receive upon the portions of the flat strips left free by cooperating 1 cut-outs but a single disk within the dimensions of disks to be transported by the belt, the recessdefining portions of the flat strips having a plurality of portions of the surfaces relieved to limit the portions thereof for contact with disks sup- 2, ported in the recesses, some of the relieved portions consisting of openings extending through the flat strips, a pulley for engaging the belt to move it into its various positions, and means on the pulley for cooperation with openings to dis- 2 lodge disks seated within the recesses.

24. In a coin-conveying apparatus, a belt for use in separating a mass of coins into individual charges of single coins, the belt comprising a plurality of sections, the sections being hingedly 3 associated so that they may be arranged flat with longitudinal edges of pairs of sections substantially in juxtaposition, the sections being capable of relative hinging movement with relation to each other to separate the edges from the juxta- 3 posed relationship, portions of two adjacent sections at the juxtaposed edges being formed to provide a plurality of coin-receiving recesses, a pulley, the belt being turned around the pulley, the juxtaposed edges being formed to provide a 4 non-rectilinear slit between adjacent sections, and means for receiving coins from the belt, the receiving means being positioned to cooperate with the belt as it is turned around the pulley and the sections are hingedly moved apart. 4 ALFRED C. O. BOCK.

JACOB J. ERNAU.