Title:
Exercise device
United States Patent 2131570


Abstract:
This invention relates to an exercise device and has for its object to enlarge the field of usefulness of a device adapted for kneeling and bodystretching. Another object is to provide such a device which may be inexpensively and attractively manufactured. A further object is to provide an...



Inventors:
Riley, Herbert E.
Application Number:
US3351735A
Publication Date:
09/27/1938
Filing Date:
07/27/1935
Assignee:
Riley, Herbert E.
Primary Class:
Other Classes:
482/106, 482/127
International Classes:
A63B21/04; A63B22/20; A63B21/00; A63B21/055
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Description:

This invention relates to an exercise device and has for its object to enlarge the field of usefulness of a device adapted for kneeling and bodystretching. Another object is to provide such a device which may be inexpensively and attractively manufactured.

A further object is to provide an exercise device capable of simulating a rowing machine, a weight lifter, and also a kneeling and body-stretching device.

The value of a device in which the user kneels and stretches the lower abdominal muscles by gripping a pair of handles which are moved toward and from the knees, with or without the action of a spring, is well known as an aid to general body health. Heretofore such devices have generally been limited in scope of usefulness to the intended exercise. Another objection to such prior devices has been that they are bulky, cumbersome and expensive. According to this invention these objections have been eliminated and an attractive exercise device provided, which can not only be sold at a reasonable price, but has its field of usefulness enlarged to permit its use in simulation of a weight lifting machine and also as a rowing machine.

Referring to the drawing, Fig. 1 is a perspective of one embodiment of this invention.

Fig. 2 is a top plan view of the device of Fig. 1, having additional handle attachments in position for use as a rowing machine.

Fig. 3 is a view of a portion of the reel housing showing the tension member and spring.

Fig. 4 is a top plan view of another embodiment of this invention.

Fig. 5 is a view partly in section of a portion of the device shown in Fig. 4.

The base 10 preferably slopes downwardly toward the reel and such base may be made of wood, molded plastics, metal stamping or it may be an aluminum die casting, for example. A sponge rubber knee pad II is set in a recess in the top of the base and the walls of this recess preferably have their sides inclined outwardly or undercut in order to assist in holding said sponge rubber pad in place. It will be understood that appropriate adhesive is also used to hold the sponge rubber pad in position. The slight inclination given the base also assists in keeping the pad in position.

In the forward portion of the base is secured a plate 12 and'this plate has mounted thereon a ring 13, which is adapted for angular displacement in the plane of the plate. The ring 13 carries a pivot pin 14 on which the reel housing 15 is adapted for angular displacement in a vertical plane. A tension member 16, preferably of fabric material, is wound on the reel I7 and within the reel is a spiral spring 18 adapted to wind up the tape upon the reel when pressure is released from the tension member. The central axis or spindle 19 is keyed to the reel housing by the flat side indicated so that one end of the spiral spring is attached to this spindle 19 and the other end of the spring is fastened to the reel 17. On the outer end of the tension member 16 is placed a quick detachable or snap fastener 20 adapted to engage an eyelet 23 on a non-rotatable rod or handle bar 22, on the outer ends of which are placed hand grips 2 1. Rollers 24 are freely rotat- 15: able on the bar 22 but are mounted against longitudinal displacement along the bar, these rollers preferably having an anti-friction or rubber-like tread so that when they are moved over the floor there is little or no tendency for them to slip sidewise.

When an operator kneels upon the pad II and grips the hand grips 21, the device of Fig. 1 may be used as a body-stretching exerciser by moving the grips as far in front as the user feels he may conveniently do and then the body is raised by pulling the hand grips and rollers toward the knee pad. This body-stretching exercise is particularly beneficial to the lower abdominal muscles adjacent the intestines with the resuit that it is beneficial in cases of constipation and other ailments. As long as the tension member 16 is fastened to the handle bar 22, the spring 18 assists in retracting the rollers toward the knee pad. If desired, after the user becomes proficient, the tension member may be detached from the handle bar 22 with the result that considerably more of an effort is necessary to retract the rollers toward the knee pad in this bodystretching exercise. Another use for the device of Fg. 1 is as a weight-lifting machine, when the operator may stand upon the knee pad II and on bending over and grasping the handle grips 21, he may raise them substantially straight up to any convenient height desired. In this vertical movement of the handle grips the reel housing will be moved about its pivot 14 until the tension member pull-out is in the direct line of force. Generally the spring 18 acts to more strongly oppose the force pulling out the tension member 16, the further it is pulled out.

A noteworthy advantage of the device shown in Fig. 1 as a body-stretching exerciser when kneeling is the ability of the handle bars to be moved sidewise a slight amount or any desired amount to couple the body-stretching with a twist. In order to direct the rollers at a slight angle to their normal path of movement it is only necessary to manually shift the hand grips until they are substantially normal to the direction in which it is desired the wheels 24 shall travel. For such slight side movements the non-slip tread surfaces of the wheels 24 assist in the prevention of their slipping on the floor should it be a waxed or polished surface. In moving the handle bars slightly to the side as just described, the ring 13 will turn with respect to the plate 12 so that the reel housing may at all times be substantially normal to the direction of the handle bars. The ease and facility with which the handle bars may be directed either straight out or somewhat to either side, without the use of any track or guide means is believed to be a worthwhile feature of this invention.

By attaching additional hand grips 25 and helical springs 26 to the eyes 27 on the handle bars, the device of Fig. 1 may be adapted to function as a rowing machine, in which case the user sits upon the knee pad 11 with his feet upon the handle bar 22 as a foot rest and then by grasping the hand grips 25, the foot rest may be moved relative to the seat and at the same time the hand grips moved to simulate a rowing action. The hand grips 25 and their coil springs 26 are preferably quickly detachable to or from the eyes 27 by means of snap fasteners 28 or some other type of quick detachable fasteners.

In Fig. 4 is shown another embodiment of this invention in which the knee pad 29 is elevated from the floor a little more than is the case in Fig. 1, so that a foot rest 30 may be formed at the side thereof. A hook 31 on the combined knee pad and foot rest is adapted to engage a cooperative recess in the frame 32 of the machine so that the frame and knee pad may be coupled together for use. The frame of the machine includes a pair of channel members 33 bent down at their ends 34 so as to have the channels raised about 2 inches from the floor. Transverse bracing members are secured to the down-turned ends 34 to give the frame rigidity. The seat 35 is mounted on rollers 45, not shown in full lines which slide in the channel members somewhat after the manner of the usual rowing machine seat. Secured to the sides of the rowing machine seat 35 are a pair of laterally extending handle grips 36 which are out of the way and not used when the device is used as a rowing machine. A number of helical springs 37 are secured at one end to one of the transverse frame members and at their other end to one of the yokes 38, which are not fixed to the seat 35. At pair of additional hand grips 39 are quickly detachable by snap fasteners 40 to tension members 41, which may or may not be elastic but preferably are not elastic. Each of the tension members is anchored at one end to the machine frame by the eyelet 42. Each tension member then passes around a pulley 43 on a yoke member 38 and thence around another pulley 44 secured to the machine frame adjacent the foot rest 30, and thence to the handle grips 39.

When used as a rowing machine the operator sits on the seat 35 with his feet against the foot rest 30 and grasps the handle grips 39 simulating the rowing movements, the pull upon the hand grips 39 is opposed by the springs 37'.

When the machine of Fig. 4 is to be used as a kneeling and body-stretching exerciser, the operator kneels on the pad 29 and grasps the handle grips 36 after the hand grips 39 have been detached by the snap fasteners 40 and the tension members 41 attached to the seat, either to an eyelet shown on the under side of the seat 35, or to a perforation through the seat. With the seat thus connected to the tension members it will be understood that the seat is initially much closer to the knee pad 29 than it is in the position illustrated in Fig. 4. As soon as pressure is applied to the hand grips 36 and the seat moves away from the knee pad, the springs 37 stretch as the yokes 38 move oppositely to the seat and increase the force opposing continued movement of the seat. In order to increase the effiectiveness of the springs, and sometimes, if desired, to do away with the springs, the seat 35 may be mounted on channels which slope upwardly and away from the knee pad or foot rest so that an increased effort is necessary in raising and pushing the seat up somewhat of an incline or hill.

Another use of the device of Fig. 4 contemplates the detachment of the combined knee pad 29 and foot rest 30 from the frame 32 of the machine by means of the connection 31. The machine frame may be then stood on either end with the channels in a substantially vertical position against a wall. Preferably both the top and bottom of the machine may be fastened to the wall when the frame is vertically arranged. If the end of the machine containing the pulley 44 is adjacent the floor then with the handles 39 attached to the tension members, a variety of exercises is available in which the machine simulates a weightlifting type exerciser. When the machine frame is vertically disposed the seat 35 and hand grips 36 may or may not be removed, but preferably they are so constructed as to be readily removable when the machine frame is placed upright. If the pulleys 44 are arranged at the top with the machine upright, then the device may simulate a weight-lifting type exerciser with a top puller.

While it is preferable to secure both ends of the machine against the wall, it will be understood that due to the outward thrust of the tension45 members exerted through the pulleys 44, at least that end of the machine frame adjacent the pulleys 44 should be fastened to the wall against outward movement.

Among the advantages of this invention may bementioned the provision of an exercise device which is especially economical of space and weight in the form shown in Fig 1. 1. The type of exerciser shown in Fig. 4, in which the handle grips are attached to a sliding seat 34 need not necessarily be used with any track or guides for the seat, since the seat 35 may be mounted on rollers having friction treads after the manner of the rollers 24 in Fig. 1.

If desired, the springs of each embodiment of the invention herein illustrated may be adjustable according to the type of user and the tension desired to be exerted. The device of Fig. 1 has no guide rail and therefore a greater freedom of movement in a horizontal direction, as well as greater freedom of movement in a vertical plane without the necessity of shifting any guideway or track for the rollers 24. It will be understood that in each embodiment illustrated other types of springs than those shown may be used. The device of Fig. 1, for example should have non-slip pads applied to the lower face of the base to prevent the base from slipping over the floor in any direction. When the device of Fig. 1 is used as a rowing machine according to the layout in Fig. 2, 76 it will be understood that the feet are preferably located between the eyes 27 and the central eye 23. The reel housing being universally mounted, is quickly adapted to properly position itself for almost any direction in which the tension member may be pulled out. The reel housing also. keeps out dust and is conducive to space economy.

The tape or tension member 16 as it passes out of the housing 15 engages loose guide pulleys on each side of it so that it is immaterial in which direction from the housing the tape is pulled.

I claim: 1. An exercise device comprising a seat, a foot rest, handle grips mounted outside some one of the foregoing parts of the device, rollers between said handle grips for supporting the same, said handle grips being adapted for use of the device in body-stretching when kneeling, a connection between said foot rest and seat, additional handle grips, a tension member detachably secured to said additional handle grips and connected adjacent said foot rest, and a retractile spring opposing a stress on said additional handle grips when the device is used as a rowing machine.

2. An exercise device comprising a knee pad, a base therefor, a rotatable substantially horizontal ring secured to said base, a spring reel and housing pivotally mounted on said ring for movement of the housing in vertical and horizontal planes, a tension member on said reel, hand grips to which said tension member may be secured, a bar spacing said hand grips, and laterally spaced rollers on said bar for supporting said hand grips as they are moved over the floor, said base and pad sloping downwardly toward said ring and reel.

3. An exercise device comprising a knee pad, a base therefor, spaced and connected hand grips, rollers on which said grips are mounted, a flexible tension member connected to said hand grips and knee pad, a spring opposing movement of said flexible tension member and hand grips away from said knee pad, said rollers being adapted to roll over the floor without any guide therefor other than the user's hands on said grips, whereby the rollers may be moved in different directions away from said knee pad at all times under resistance of said spring.

4. An exercise device comprising a knee pad, spaced and connected hand grips, a roller on which said grips are mounted to be rolled over the floor toward and from said pad, a spring cooperating with said pad and grips and pivotally mounted with respect to the pad, whereby said grips may be moved in different horizontal directions toward and from said pad, said pad having a slope toward the floor and hand grips.

5. An exercise device comprising a knee pad, spaced and connected hand grips, a roller on which said grips are mounted to be rolled over the floor toward and from said pad, a spring cooperating with said pad and grips and pivotally mounted with respect to the pad, whereby said grips may be moved in different horizontal directions toward and from said pad, a rod connecting said hand grips, a flexible tension member between said spring and rod, and attachments enabling said device to simulate a rowing machine, said attachments including additional hand grips secured to said rod with a spring between the rod and each of the additional hand grips.

6. An exercise machine comprising a knee pad, a rod, spaced and connected hand grips on said rod, a roller on said rod, a flexible tension member detachably secured to said rod, a retractile spring between said tension member and knee pad, a reel on which the tension member is adapted to be rolled up, and additional grips and springs mounted on said rod and adapted for use when the machine simulates a rowing machine, said reel being mounted to enable said tension member to be pulled out in different directions in both a horizontal and vertical plane, whereby said machine may be used as a body-stretching device when the user kneels on the pad and moves said grips toward and from the pad, or said machine may be used to simulate a weight-lifting type exerciser by pulling up on said tension member, or said machine may be used to simulate a rowing machine type exerciser by sitting on said pad with the feet on said rod.

7. An exercise device comprising a knee pad, a reel having a flexible tension member constructed to be unwound from said reel, a spring for rewinding said tension member on the reel upon release of pressure on the tension member, a base for said knee pad, a pair of hand grips to which said flexible tension member is secured and a universal connection between the reel and base to permit the tension member pull-out to occur in different directions in either a horizontal or a vertical plane relative to said base.

8. An exercise device comprising a knee pad, a base below the knee pad, a reel, a pivotal connection below said reel and between said reel and base for mounting the reel above the base, a flexible tension member wound on said reel, a spring for opposing the pulling out of said tension member and rewinding the same on the reel upon release of pressure on the tension member, a laterally extending bar to which said tension member is connected, spaced rollers on said bar, hand grips on said bar, whereby said bar may be moved over the floor in different directions in any part of its travel toward or from the reel and knee pad.

9. An exercise device comprising a seat, a rest against which the feet may be placed when sitting on the seat for simulation of rowing movements, handles between said seat and foot rest, spring means connected to the handles for opposing their movement away from the foot rest when the device is used as a rowing machine, roller mounted hand grips on one of the first two mounted elements for use in body stretching, and spring means opposing relative separation of the seat and foot rest during body stretching when kneeling adjacent one of them.

HERBERT E. RILEY.