Title:
Golf club
United States Patent 2130395


Abstract:
This invention relates to tubular metallic golf club shafts. It is now pretty generally known that a steel tubular golf club shaft has vibrations under impact with the ball far in excess of a hickory golf club shaft. It is also a well known fact that this excess vibration, particularly in...



Inventors:
Lard, Allan E.
Application Number:
US9355436A
Publication Date:
09/20/1938
Filing Date:
07/31/1936
Assignee:
Lard, Allan E.
Primary Class:
Other Classes:
473/318
International Classes:
A63B53/12; A63B59/00
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Description:

This invention relates to tubular metallic golf club shafts.

It is now pretty generally known that a steel tubular golf club shaft has vibrations under impact with the ball far in excess of a hickory golf club shaft. It is also a well known fact that this excess vibration, particularly in the so-called iron clubs, communicates an unpleasant feel or sting to the fingers.

I have found that prior efforts to reduce said excess vibration through the use of a resilient filler material have failed because such resilient material does not substantially reduce or retard the said vibrations. I have succeeded where others have failed because of my use of a substantially non-resilient dowel in conjunction with friction in an entirely novel manner.

Therefore, a main object of this invention is to so retard the shaft vibrations resulting from impact of the club head with a golf ball to such an extent as will eliminate the unpleasant feel or sting, above alluded to.

Another object of my invention is to provide simple inexpensive means operable to retard such vibrations and which may be readily applied to the ordinary steel tubular golf club shaft.

Other objects of the invention will be readily apparent from the following specification wherein I have described a shaft which is a preferred embodiment of my invention, which is illustrated in the accompanying drawings, wherein: Fig. I illustrates a golf club of the "irons" type employing a shaft embodying my invention, said view being of longitudinally spaced fragments and some portions being shown in elevation, other portions in longitudinal medial section; Pig. 2 is a fragmentary view of a golf club, showing a lower end portion of a steel tubular shaft and a club head hosel, both in longitudinal medial sectional view, and a slitted tapered adhesive coated dowel, shown in elevation, inserted in said shaft, said shaft and dowel being illustrated as being bent under the strain caused by impact of the club head with a golf ball: Fig. 3 is a view similar to that of Fig. 2 but showing a reverse or reactive flexure, which follows the initial bending as shown in Fig. 2 due to the resilient reaction of the steel tubular shaft.

Figs. 4, 5 and 6 illustrate in elevation successive steps which may preferably be followed in the making of a dowel preferably employed in said embodiment.

Fig. 7 illustrates in elevation a possible modiSfication, comprising a friction coated solid dowel. Fig. 8 shows a modified dowel in the process of being made from two like parallel wood pieces each of half-round sectional form.

Fig. 9 shows in plan, an upper split end of the dowel of Figure 6 with adhesive or friction material applied to its outer surfaces. Fig. 10 is a view of a complete golf club a portion of the hand grip covering adjacent the shaft end being removed to expose the upper end of the shaft which is notched for a purpose later herein described. Fig. 11 illustrates in elevation another modified dowel construction which I may employ.

Fig. 12 illustrates in elevation still another dowel construction which may be employed.

Fig. 13 illustrates in transverse section, anupper split end of another modified form of dowel inserted in a tubular shaft, embodying my invention.

Fig. 14 illustrates in transverse section, an upper split end of another modified form of dowel inserted in a grooved tubular shaft, embodying my invention.

Referring now to the above drawings and referring first to the embodiment of my invention illustrated in Figs. 1 to 6 incl., and Figs. 9 and 10, Fig. 4 shows a tapered dowel 2 (a wooden rod) slit with a .009 cutter to within 3" of the small end, to form prongs or forks, 6 and 7. The dowel 2 is turned to conform to the shape and dimensions of the internal wall of the shaft I for a, distance of approximately 22" from the small end, but of a somewhat smaller diameter for a purpose hereinafter stated. The dowel 2 is preferably dipped as shown in Fig. 6, in a non-resilient adhesive and spun to obtain a uniform thickness that will snugly register with the aforesaid wall of the shaft I when inserted in the same, space for which is provided by the slightly reduced diameter of dowel, as stated above.

The non-resilient adhesive when applied is. warmed to cause it to be of a dipping consistency, and is composed preferably of a mixture approximately the same as used in surgical adhesive tape.

The prongs 6 and 7 are preferably first pinned together by pin 5, to prevent contact of the adhesive 3 with the flat faces 4 of the split dowel 2 during dipping. It is then chilled and the oins 5 withdrawn as shown in Fig. 6, leaving said faces 4 free to slide on each other under the bending action of impact, and the dowel 2 is inserted in. the shaft I under light pressure, it being preferable that the dowel be not driven too tightly into the shaft.

The shaft I is now driven in the socket 8 of the iron head and pinned with the usual rivet 9, which also passes through the dowel 2 and anchors the same. One of the round sections 6 between the edges of the slot 4, faces the front and the shaft I is so pinned in the head 10. A notch II, Fig. 10, is filed in the upper end of the shaft I to indicate said front, this being in order to insure that when the dowel is assembled into a golf club such as shown in Fig. 10, the workmen may readily insert the shaft I containing the dowel into the club head hosel 8 in the proper relative angular position so that one of the round sections 6 of the dowel will face the front of the shaft, i. e., will be positioned on the same side siof the shaft as is the striking face I a of the club head I0.

When a ball is impacted by the head 10 of a club having the usual resilient steel shaft, the shaft I is thereby flexed and almost instantane eous rebound occurs followed by other rebounds (vibrations). In the use of my improved shaft employing the split wood dowel, under such conditions, the flat faces 4 of the dowel 2 being in compressed engagement, move on each other creating friction which retards such movement, and causes the dowel to become nonresilient.

This may be demonstrated by taking one of these split dowels, and winding it lightly with a cotton string throughout its length and then bending it laterally in the direction of alignment of the two split-separated forks or prongs 6 and 7. It will be seen that the friction existing between the engaged faces of the prongs by the compressive action of the string prevents the return of the bent prongs to their former straight form and therefore causes it to become nonresilient. It is understood, of course, that the split dowel 2 is wound with the string merely to produce approximately the same pressure it will receive when it is inserted in the shaft I under the aforesaid light pressure.

When the shaft is flexed due to impact of the club head with a ball, the vibrations of the shaft are subdued not only by the frictional contact between the engaging flat faces of the dowel prongs 6 and 7, but also by the frictional engagement of the outer rounded faces of the prongs which, as previously stated, are covered with a facing of the said non-resilient adhesive material, since the outer rounded surfaces of the prongs move relatively in opposite longitudinal direction relative to the engaged wall surfaces with the adhesive material engaging also the inner wall surfaces of the shaft, and such friction between said moving parts retards the first and subsequent rebounding vibrations of the steel shaft to an extent that eliminates the previously mentioned unpleasant feel or sting. If it were not for the resiliently reactive properties of the steel shaft, the shaft containing the dowel would remain permanently bent, but, of course, this would be highly undesirable, and therefore, the dowel is inserted in the shaft with light pressure, and I find that when so inserted the vibration retarding effect of the split dowel can be very nicely adjusted to the resilient qualities of the steel shaft to sufficiently subdue the vibrations to accomplish the object of achieving a sweeter feeling shot and without impairing the efficiency of the shaft in driving a ball.

Fig. 8 shows a modification in which the dowel is composed of two half-round members 13 and 14 and the lower three inches glued together. The members 13 and 14 are preferably first of semicylindrical form, and of a diameter which may be for instance, as indicated at 16, and are then placed face to face, and the lower three inches of the length of the abutting faces are glued together. A pin 5 at the upper end of the dowel serves temporarily to hold the two members 13 and 14 together. The dowel is then turned to tapered form as before described, below the portion marked 16 , the portion 16 being gripped by the chuck of the turning lathe. After turning, the upper enlarged portion 16 above the point 16a is sawed off so that the remainder of the dowel is entirely of tapered form. The dowel is then dipped in the non-resilient adhesive material and otherwise prepared for use precisely in the manner of the split dowel as shown in Figs. 4, 5 and 6.

Figs. 2 and 3 show the action the flexed split dowel performs which converts same into a nonresilient dowel. Fig. 2 shows a backward flexure upon impact with the ball and it will be noted that the back side 6 protrudes beyond the front side 7, said back side 6 having moved relatively under flexure. On the rebound this is reversed, and Fig. 3 shows the front side 7 protruding beyond the back side 6 said front side 7 having moved relatively under flexure. The normal position is shown in Fig. 1. The friction between these two flat faces is what causes, as before stated, the dowel to become non-resilient.

The relative movement which takes place, under flexure, between the flat faces also is bound to take place between the half-round sections and! the wall of the shaft, thus creating still more friction and consequently further retarding the vibrations of the steel shaft.

Fig. 7 shows a modification in which a solid dowel, without a slot, is employed. This dowel. is likewise tapered and some friction material applied. The friction material is preferably "tacky" and drags on the resilient dowel and on the resilient shaft, and under flexure the frictional and stretching action of the friction material, to some extent, retards the vibrations of impact but not so effectively as the split dowel.

SBoth the solid and the split dowels are preferably affixed at a lower end portion to a lower portion of the shaft. -45 Fig. 11 shows a modification in which a dowel 2 preferably split (it may be un-split) as previously described is' dipped in said non-resilient adhesive and wound spirally with a cotton string 15, the convolutions abutting. What adhesive is forced up between the convolutions is wiped and the surface made round and smooth.

Fig. 12 shows a modification in which a dowel 2 preferably split (it may be un-split) as previously described is wound, the convolutions abutting, with a ΒΌ/4" tape 16 having the said nonresilient adhesive applied to both sides.

As the dipped, wound, or taped dowel is pushed into the tapered shaft, the pressure on the adhesive material from the wall of the shaft on one side and from the dowel on the other excludes the air and hermetically seals the adhesive material so that it remains adhesively pliable indefinitely. The pores of the wood are sealed with any pore-sealing dip to prevent the wood dowel absorbing the adhesive material.

I may have a plurality of sections, as illustrated in Fig. 13, for instance, four one-quarter round sections a-b-c and d instead of two half-round sections. I may employ balsa wood sawdust with a non-resilient adhesive binder molded by the shaft to fit the internal wall of the same. I may employ a butted tube made from a thin tapered strip of wood steamed and formed to fit the internal wall. The invention is applicable to iron or wood heads. The shaft may or may not b tapered.

In Fig. 14 I have illustrated an embodiment oJ my invention which employs a dowel which is particularly formed with an exterior surface containing longitudinal grooves in order that such dowel may be employed with grooved tubular shafts of the general type disclosed in my prior Patent 1,450,091 dated March 27, 1923, and for purpose of example I have illustrated herein a dowel with an upper split end of the type illustrated in Fig. 6 as being inserted into the tapered grooved tubular shaft 2 1. The dowel sections are shown at 26 and 27, the view being a transverse sectional view through the grooved tubular shaft and an upper or split portion of the dowel. Between the engaging surfaces of the dowel and shaft, there is interposed as in the previous embodiments the adhesive material 23.

The two dowel sections in the case of a three grooved dowel and shaft will preferably have their abutting faces extending diametrically as shown at 24, although the dowel may be split to provide two, three, or more sections, and it will be well understood that various modifications in form of the dowel outer surfaces and the division of the upper end of the dowel into sections, may be employed with the purview of my invention, and that my invention may be employed with shafts having varying number of grooves such as one, two, three, four or more grooves.

In this invention I have given careful consideration to the matter of weight. No golf club manufacturer will adopt any device that materially increases the weight of the shaft beyond certain weights now specified.

I am aware that it has been proposed to insert in steel golf shafts resilient, heavy materials which do not retard the vibration and the weight 40- of which renders them useless, and that numerous constructions have been previously proposed involving merely a supposed reinforcement of the shaft against breakage, but involving the use of relatively resilient fillers, many of which actually increase the resiliency of the finished shaft, and therefore do not detract from the bending vibration. No case of prior construction is known to me, where the friction of relatively longitudinally moving surfaces of an inserted dowel or equivalent element and the inner walls of the shaft, and the differential relative longitudinal movement of the dowel, of different portions of a dowel, or between a dowel and the steel shaft wall would be employed to subdue the vibra05 tions occasioned in the use of a golf club having a steel outer shaft.

Regarding such expressions as "less resilient" or "less resiliency" employed in certain of the appended claims, I am aware that an article when 00 flexed must, by itself, return to its original shape in order to be truly resilient, but when the return is incomplete, I have used the above expression to cover the conditions.

I am aware that numerous and extensive de05 partures may be made from the embodiments of my invention herein illustrated and described, by employing the principles of my invention which have been above described in connection with a preferred embodiment and certain variant forms. I therefore claim as my invention: 1. A golf club comprising a shaft, a hand grip and club head responsively affixed to the two ends of the shaft, said shaft comprising a tube having a resiliently bendable intermediate portion, a sub.75 stantially less resilient frictional element subS stantially loosely telescoped within said tube being of such a length as to be longitudinally coextensive with at least a substantial portion of the length of said intermediate portion, said frictional element being split, the parts thereof adapted to move longitudinally differentially upon any bending of, and relative to the contiguous inner wall surfaces of said co-extensive tube portion, the outer surfaces of both said parts making retarding frictional contact with said inner wall surfaces, said frictional element outer surface comprising a cushioning material having adhesive qualities and so disposed as to be free of non-rebounding effects upon said tube, the split of said frictional element separating said element into two independently longitudinally movable portions relatively substantially aligned with the direction of movement of said club head when applied to strike a golf ball.

2. A golf club comprising a shaft, a hand grip and club head responsively affixed to two ends of the shaft, said shaft comprising a tube having a resiliently bendable intermediate portion, a substantially less resilient frictional element substantially loosely telescoped within said tube being of such a length as to be longitudinally co-extensive with at least a substantial portion of the length of said intermediate portion, said frictional element split to provide a transversly divided end, the ends of the two prongs thereof g0 adapted to relatively move differentially in opposite directions longitudinally of the tube upon bending of the said co-extensive tube portion, in either direction transversely of the transverse division of said divided frictional element and both making frictional contact with opposite lateral walls of the tube, a portion of said frictional element spaced longitudinally. from said divided end secured against longitudinal movement relative to the contiguous portion of said tube, said frictional element outer surface being formed of friction cushion material so disposed as to be free of non-rebounding effects upon said tube, and frictionally retarding laterally vibratile movement of said tube otherwise transmitted in relatively increased degree towards the hand grip end of said tube, the split of said frictional element separating said element into two independently longitudinally movable portions relatively substantially aligned with the direction of movement of said club head when applied to strike a golf ball.

3. A golf club comprising a shaft, a hand grip and club head responsively affixed to the two ends of the shaft, said shaft comprising a tube having a resiliently bendable portion, a substantially less resilient frictional element telescoped within said tube being of such length as to be longitudinally co-extensive with at least a substantial portion of the length of said intermediate portion, said frictional element split to provide a transversely divided end, the ends of the two prongs thereof adapted to relatively move differentially in opposite directions longitudinally of the tube upon bending of said co-extensive tube portion, in either direction transversely to the transverse division of said divided frictional element and both making frictional contact with opposite lateral walls of the tube, a portion of said frictional element spaced longitudinally from said divided end secured against longitudinal movement relative to the contiguous portion of said tube and with each other, and the outer surface of said frictional element comprising cushioning friction material disposed tobe freer of non-rebounding effect upon said tube, and frictionally retarding lateral vibratile movements of said tube otherwise transmitted in relatively increased degree toward the hand grip end of said tube, and the split of said frictional element separating said element into two independently longitudinally movable portions relatively substantially aligned with the direction of movement of said club head when applied to strike a golf ball.

4. A golf club comprising a shaft, a hand grip and club head responsively affixed to the two ends of the shaft, said shaft comprising a tube having an intermediate resiliently bendable portion, a wood dowel or equivalent element substantially loosely telescoped within said tube being of such a length as to be longitudinally coextensive with at least a substantial portion of the length of said bendable portion, said dowel element having an upper divided end, and secured by a lower portion against longitudinal movement relative to said tube, the prongs thereof adapted to move longitudinally relatively differentially upon any bending of the said coextensive tube portion, and said d prongs making frictional contact with each other and with opposite lateral walls of the tube, the opposite outer surfaces of said prongs being adhesively faced with a frictionally adhesive substance, said adhesive substance effecting a retarding frictional dragging action between said prong surfaces and said tube lateral walls and dampening rapid reed-like vibrations of said tube, the split of said frictional element separating said element into two independently longitudinal movable portions relatively substantially aligned with the direction of movement of said club head when applied to strike a golf ball.

5. A golf club comprising a club head includ5:40 ing a tubular hosel, a shaft having an end projected within and secured to said hosel, said shaft being of tubular metallic material, a wood or equivalent elongated friction element so disposed substantially loosely longitudinally within the shaft as to extend for a substantially bendable length thereof, and making frictional engagement with the lateral surface of the inner wall of the shaft, the said frictionally engaged portion of said elongated element being coated with a frictional adhesive substance, said substance engaging also the inner surfaces of the shaft inner wall and retarding rapid reed-like vibratile bending effects imposed upon the club head supporting end of said tube to dampen such effects.

6. A tubular shaft for golf clubs comprising hand grip and head supporting ends and an intermediate flexing portion, a dowel-like element of wood or equivalent material substantially loosely telescoped within at least a bendable portion of said intermediate shaft portion, the dowel having portions thereof relatively movable in frictional engagement upon bending of the dowel, said dowel preferably affixed at a lower end to a lower portion of said shaft being otherwise unsecured and sufficiently loosely fitted within the tube as to make frictional engagement with the inner surfaces of the walls of said shaft in portions of said shaft disposed upwardly from its secured end, and the outer surface of the dowel-like element comprising a relatively thin layer of cushioning material adapted to exert a frictional drag on the inner walls of the shaft as the dowel-like element is moved relative to said inner walls as the shaft is flexed.

7. A tubular shaft for golf clubs comprising hand grip and head supporting ends and an intermediate flexing portion, a dowel-like element of wood or equivalent material of substantially less resiliency than said tubular shaft material substantially loosely telescoped within at least a bendable portion of said intermediate shaft portion, the dowel having portions thereof relatively movable and in frictional engagement upon bending of the dowel, said dowel preferably affixed by a lower end to a lower portion of said shaft being otherwise unsecured and sufficiently loosely fitted within the tube as to make frictional engagement with the inner surfaces of the opposite lateral walls of said shaft in portions of said shaft disposed upwardly from its secured end, and a layer of friction material dis-placeable under pressure interposed between the upper outer surfaces of said dowel and shaft inner wall surfaces, said friction material being of substantially non-rebounding character and effecting a dragging action upon the contiguous surfaces of said wood element and shaft walls to dampen rapid reed-like vibratile movements of said shaft bendable portion.

8. A golf club comprising a tubular shaft, a hand grip and a club head responsively supported on the two opposite ends of the shaft, said shaft having an intermediate flexing portion, a dowellike element of wood or equivalent material of substantially less resiliency than said tubular shaft material substantially loosely telescoped within at least a bendable portion of said intermediate shaft- portion, said dowel preferably affixed by a lower end to a lower portion of said shaft being otherwise unsecured and sufficiently loosely fitted within the tube as to make frictional engagement with the inner surfaces of the opposite lateral walls of said shaft in portions of said shaft disposed upwardly from its secured end, and a layer of adhesive material interposed between the upper outer surfaces of said dowel and shaft inner wall surfaces, the upper portion of said dowel comprising separate prongs, said adhesive material being of substantially non-rebounding character and effecting a dragging action uponp the contiguous surfaces of said wood element and shaft walls to dampen rapid reedlike vibratile movements of said shaft bendable portion, the split of said frictional element separating said element into two independently longi- 0 tudinal movable portions relatively substantially aligned with the direction of movement of said club head when applied to strike a golf ball.

9. A golf club comprising a tubular shaft, a hand grip and a club head responsively sup- 5 ported on the two opposite ends of the shaft, said shaft having an intermediate flexing portion, a dowel-like element of wood or equivalent material of substantially less resiliency than said tubular shaft material substantially loosely telescoped co within at least a bendable portion of said intermediate shaft portion, said dowel affixed by a lower end to a lower portion of said shaft being otherwise unsecured and sufficiently loosely fitted within the tube as to make frictional engage- j65 ment with the inner surfaces of the opposite lateral walls of said shaft in portions of said shaft disposed upwardly from its secured end, said dowel having its upper end slitted in a direction extending transversely of said inner shaft wall 7O surfaces to effect differential relative longitudinal movements of the dowel forks caused by the bending of the shaft in portions of its length including said dowel, and a layer of adhesive material interposed between the outer surfaces of said dowel and shaft inner wall surfaces, said adhesive material being of substantially nonrebounding character and effecting a. dragging action upon the contiguous surfaces of said wood element and shaft walls to dampen rapid reed-like vibratile movements of said shaft bendable portion, the split of said frictional element separating said element into two independently longitudinal movable portions relatively substantially aligned with the direction of movement of said club head when applied to strike a golf ball.

10. A golf club comprising a club head including a tubular hosel, a shaft having an end projected within and secured to said hosel, said shaft being of tubular metallic material, and retarding means loosely fitting within the shaft walls throughout a substantial portion of the shaft length proceeding upwardly from said head, adapted to retard reed-like vibratile longitudinal movements of the engaged shaft wall portions relative to said retarding means incurred when said shaft wall portions are bent laterally involving resilient stretching of one wall portion and concurrent resilient compression of the opposite wall portion, said retarding means comprising an application of adhesive textile material, carrying a layer of adhesive material on its outer surface for engagement with the inner wall surfaces of the shaft, said adhesive material being of substantially non-rebounding character and effecting a dragging action upon the contiguous surfaces of said wood element and shaft walls to dampen rapid reed-like vibratile movements of said shaft bendable portion.

11. A golf club comprising a club head including a tubular hosel, a shaft having an end projected within and secured to said hosel, said shaft being of tubular metallic material, a laterally flexible elongated friction element loosely fitting within the shaft and extending for a substantial portion of the shaft length, adapted to frictionally retard longitudinal movements of said walls relative to the opposing friction element surfaces, said friction element comprising a dowel of wood and an exterior wrapping of tape, carrying on both its surfaces a coating of adhesive material, said adhesive material contacting also the contiguous inner walls of said shaft and effecting a drag thereon when said shaft portion is bent, and being substantially non-rebounding in character, and effecting a dampening action upon rapid reed-like vibrations of said shaft portion.

12. A shaft for golf clubs comprising a tube having hand grip and club head supporting end portions, and a resiliently bendable intermediate portion, a substantially less resilient frictional element substantially loosely telescoped within said tube being of such a length as to be longitudinally coextensive with at least a substantial Sportion of the length of said intermediate portion, said frictional element having a divided end, prongs thereof adapted to move longitudinally differentially upon any bending of the said coextensive tube portion, each of said prongs making frictional contact with opposite lateral walls of the tube, each of said prongs of said frictional element being faced with a layer of adhesive material, and an adhesive material coating the outer surface of the prongs for engagement with the inner wall of the shaft, said adhesive material contacting also the contiguous inner walls of said shaft and effecting a drag thereon when said shaft portion is bent, and being substantially non-rebounding in character, and effecting a dampening action upon rapid reed-like vibrations of said shaft portion, the split of said frictional element separating said element into two independently longitudinal movable portions relatively substantially aligned with the direction of movement of said club head when applied to strike a golf ball.

13. A tubular metallic shaft for golf clubs comprising a hand grip and head supporting ends and an intermediate flexing portion, a retarding dowel inserted within at least a bendable por- tion of said intermediate shaft portion, said retarding dowel being so loosely fitted within said shaft as to effect relative longitudinal movements of the engaged surfaces of said dowel and shaft subsequent to impact of the club head with a golf ball, whereby said dowel frictionally retards and dampens such shaft vibrations, said dowel and the dowel-enclosing portion of said shaft longitudinally grooved and the groove portion of said shaft projecting within the grooves of said dowel, an adhesive material interposed between the contiguous surfaces of said grooved dowel and grooved shaft, said surfaces being adhesively yieldingly bound by said adhesive material.

14. A tubular metallic shaft for golf clubs comprising a hand grip and head supporting ends and an intermediate flexing portion, a retarding dowel loosely inserted within at least a bendable 4 portion of said intermediate shaft portion, and a thin layer of plastic adhesive material interposed between and contacting opposing surfaces of said dowel and said shaft, said retarding dowel acting to retard reed-like vibrations of said metallic shaft after impact with the ball, said adhesive material being of substantially non-rebounding character and effecting a dragging action upon the contiguous surfaces of said wood element and shaft walls to dampen rapid reedlike vibratile movements of said shaft bendable portion.

ALLAN E. LARD.