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Title:
Pulsating jig
United States Patent 2122039
Abstract:
This invention relates to improvements in pulsator riffle jigs of which the following is a specification. This invention relates to devices for concentrating metallic ores and has reference more particularly to devices for concentrating fine gold ores and/or recovering gold from sands and...


Inventors:
Logue, Leland H.
Publication Date:
06/28/1938
Assignee:
DENVER PATENT COMPANY
Primary Class:
Other Classes:
209/500, 366/124, 366/160.1
International Classes:
B03B5/16
View Patent Images:
Description:

This invention relates to improvements in pulsator riffle jigs of which the following is a specification.

This invention relates to devices for concentrating metallic ores and has reference more particularly to devices for concentrating fine gold ores and/or recovering gold from sands and fine gravel.

It is an object of this invention to produce a pulsator riffle jig that shall be provided with both a flexible diaphragm and a periodically opening and closing valve or a pump operated in synchronism with the diaphragm for admitting water on the up stroke of the diaphragm only. Another object of the invention is to produce a device having a flexible diaphragm and means for flexing the same without producing lateral movements thereof or twisting strains.

A further object of this invention is to produce an apparatus of the class described in which there Swill be no cross-currents set up and in which the water will flow upwardly only through the screen.

A still further object is to produce a riffle jig of the pulsator type in which the screen can be ,- readily removed for cleaning.

The above and other objects that may become apparent as this description proceeds are attained by means of a construction and an arrangement of parts that will now be described in detail and for this purpose reference will be had Sto the accompanying drawings in which the invention has been illustrated in its preferred form, and in which Fig. 1 is a view taken on line I-1, Fig. 2, and 3shows the machine partly in section and partly in elevation; Fig. 2 is a section taken on line 2-2, Fig. 1; Fig. 3 is a section of the screen box, taken on line 3-3, Fig. 4; I Fig. 4 is a section through the screen box taken on line 4-4, Fig. 3; Fig. 5 is a section taken on line 5-5, Fig. 6; Fig. 6 is a top plan view looking downwardly in the direction of arrow 6 in Fig. 1; Fig. 7 is a diagrammatic view showing the relationship of the valve and the diaphragms; Fig. 8 is a view similar to that shown in Fig. 7 and shows the invention embodied in a single unit; and Fig. 9 is a section through the valve, taken on line 9-9, Fig. 7, the cover being shown in place thereon.

In the drawings numeral 5 designates the hutch of which there are two in the preferred embodiment. Each hutch has a rectangular top portion, one side 6 of which extends downwardly to the lowest point. The sides 7 and 8 terminate in triangular wall portions la and 8a and the front sides 9 also terminate in downwardly and rearwardly inclined triangular wall portions 9a, all as shown in Figs. 1 and 2.

At the bottom of each hutch a concentrate discharge opening 10 is provided whose size can be controlled by a movable slide II. Wall 9 terminates at 12, which is a considerable distance below the top of wall 6. Walls 7 and 8 have parts that terminate along line 12, and other parts that extend upwardly to the bottoms of the discharge spout 13 and the feed hopper 14, and to the corresponding positions on the chute 15. A partition wall 16 extends upwardly from point 17 and forms with walls 6, 7 and 8 a rectangular compartment in which the screen box is located.

Walls 6 and 16 are provided on their inner surfaces with supporting brackets 18 (Fig. 2). The screen or launder boxes are substantially identical in size and shape and have been illustrated in Figs. 3, 4 and 5. Each screen box has two parallel sides 19 and 20 to the upper ends of which angle irons 21 have been attached, as shown in Figs. 3 and 4; each angle has a flange 22 that extends outwardly in spaced parallel relation with the flanges 23 on walls 6 and 16. Bolts 24 extend through registering openings in flanges 22 and 23 and serve to clamp the screen box against the supporting brackets 18. Each box has end walls 25 and 26, and wall 26 carries the discharge spout 13. Secured to each flange 22 is a handle 27 by means of which the screen box can be removed and replaced. Each screen box has a perforated bottom 29 that is supported on spaced rods 30.

Located some distance above the bottom is an inclined screen 31 that is also supported on rods 32.

The screen 31 terminates short of wall 26 so as to leave an opening 33. In the preferred form, illustrated in Figs. 1, 5 and 6, there are two hutches placed side by side and connected by the chute 15 and these are substantially identical but the one shown on the right side in Fig. 1 is somewhat taller than the one on the left and carries the feed hopper or chute 14; the difference in height makes it possible to position the lower end of the screen 31 of the intake hutch above the upper end of the corresponding screen in the other hutch, all as shown in Fig. 1. When material, such as pulp or sand, is fed into the hopper 14 it will flow through the two screen boxes in series and will be discharged through the spout 13.

Located between walls 9 and 16 and walls 7 S and 8 of each hutch is a flexible diaphragm 34 of rubberized fabric or rubber composition. The edges of the diaphragm are secured to the horizontal flanges of the angle Irons 35 by means of bolts 36. In the machine illustrated the diaphragm is rectangular and has a central opening that is closed by a metal plate 37, and which is held in place by means of bolts 36 and a ring 38.

A walking beam 39 is mounted for oscillation about a pivot 40 and has attached to one end a connecting rod 41 whose other end is operatively connected with an eccentric 42 that is carried on the drive shaft 43. Shaft 43 is journalled in bearings 44 and 45, the former of which is attached to the wall 16 and the latter to an angle iron 46 supported on two vertical angle irons 47.

A pulley 49 is connected to the shaft 43 between the bearing 45 and the rotary valve 48. Further reference to valve 48 will be made hereinafter. Connecting rods 50 have their upper ends pivotally connected at 51 to the walking beam.

Pivots 51 are equidistantly spaced from pivot 40, but this is not an essential but in the construction shown it is believed to be preferable. The lower 26 ends of rods 50 are connected to the center points of the plates 37 as shown in Figs. 1 and 2.

When shaft 43 rotates the walking beam oscillates about pivot 40 and reciprocates the rods 50 and thereby flexes the diaphragms equally in opposite directions. Owing to the fact that the distance from pivots 40 and 51 is quite large and the angle of oscillation quite small and to the further fact that the beam is horizontal at the center of its arc of oscillation there is only a very small movement of the upper ends of the rods 50 toward and away from the pivot 40 with the result that the rods, for all practical purposes, may be said to reciprocate in a straight line. At any rate, the sidewise or rocking movement of the rods 50 is so small that it has no injurious effect on the diaphragms. If the same degree of flexure of the diaphragm were obtained by a construction In which the upper ends of rods 50 were connected with cranks or eccentrics giving the same effect, the rocking of the rods would be comparatively great and would subject the diaphragms to strains that would tend to greatly shorten their lives.

The use of a walking beam is a feature of construction that has considerable advantage in the combination shown and is in no sense a mere mechanical equivalent of a crank of equal throw.

The construction of the rotary valve 48 has been shown in Figs. 7, 8 and. 9, from which it will be seen that a rotary valve member 48a is carried by the shaft 43 and held against rotation thereon. A water supply pipe 53, which is in communication with a source of water under pressure, is connected with the cover 54 of the rotary valve and pipes 55 and 56 are also connected with the valve casing. The connection between the pipes 55 and 56 and the casing are 180 degrees apart. The rotor 48a has a flange 51 that extends 180 degrees about its circumference and serves in one position to connect pipe 53 with pipe 55 and when in another position to connect pipe 53 with pipe 56. When the pipes are connected to the housing 180 degrees apart pipe 53 will be connected with pipes 55 and 56 alternately, each pipe receiving water from pipe 53 during one half of each revolution of shaft 43.

The operation of the valve is so related to the operation of the diaphragms that water will be admitted to each unit on the upstroke of the diaphragms only, and in Fig. 7, the parts have been 76 shown so positioned that the water is just being admitted to the left-hand unit and the diaphragm is at the beginning of the upward stroke.

The length of time that the water is permitted to flow depends on the angular extent of the flange 57 and, as has been explained above, each pipe 55 and 56 receives water through a half revolution of shaft 43. It is also evident that instead of a single rotary valve a separate valve can be used for each pipe.

When the diaphragm moves downwardly water is displaced and this is then forced to the other side of the wall 16 and produces an upward flow through the screen. When the diaphragm moves upwardly the increased volume thus produced will be filled with water admitted through pipe 55 or 56, as the case may be, through the action of the valve and in this way a downward flow through the screen as well as the production of cross currents are prevented. It will be understood of course that the water or pressure fluid is introduced in an amount corresponding to or approximating the capacity or volume increase of the hutch under the action of the diaphragm.

It is evident that when the device is in operation there will be a continuous pulsation of water upwardly through the screen which produces an agitation of the sand and gravel supported on the screen 29, which is the fine screen, thereby facilitating the downward movement of the heavier metal particles which pass through the gravel bed, through the screen 29 and into the hutch and are finally discharged through the opening 10.

In Fig. 8 a modification has been shown in which a single unit is employed. The diaphragm is flexed by a mechanism employing a walking beam but the valve 48 has a rotor 48a that is provided with a flange 51 that extends 180* and which disconnects pipe 53 from pipe 55 during half of each revolution of shaft 43.

When this machine is in use pulp or sand and gravel mixed with water is fed to the Intake hopper 14 and flows over the coarse screen 31, which removes the oversized particles in the screen box, and water and the smaller particles pass through this screen and onto the fine screen 29. The coarser particles flow through the chute 15 and onto the screen 31 in the unit to the left where a further screening action takes place.

When shaft 43 is rotated the pulsations of the water produced thereby keeps the material on screens 29 continually agitated thereby facilitating the downward movement of the gold particles which finally pass through this screen and into the hutch. The upward flow of the water, produced by the downward flexing of the diaphragms agitates the material on screens 29 and causes some of it to pass upwardly through the openings 33. The effect of the pulsations on the material supported on screen 29 is to produce a classification in which the light material is on the top, the heavy material forms a bedding at the bottom, the heavy large-concentrates are on top of the bedding and directly above this are the middlings.

The gold and other metal values that pass through the screen 29 are finally discharged through the opening 10 and, owing to their passage through the sand and gravel on screen 29, they are thoroughly cleaned and are therefore in proper condition for amalgamation. The screen boxes can be readily removed for cleaning by loosening the clamping bolts 24 after which the handles 21 can be grasped and the screen boxes lifted out and cleaned.

The level of the overflow weirs at the outlet from the screen or launder sections can be varied I by adding or removing bars 58 as indicated in x Fig. 4.

Attention is called to the construction, including the walking beam 39, for flexing the diaphragms as this gives a substantially straight t line movement to the connecting rods 50 and avoids the production of twisting strains such as would be produced by a crank and this greatly prolongs the life of the diaphragms.

The combined action of the diaphragms and the valve that controls the admission of water produce a pulsating action without setting up of any cross currents.

The removable screen or launder sections make it convenient to clean the same and to remove the matted gold bedded on screen 29.

Instead of the valve 48 it is possible to substitute a pump that is driven from shaft 43. This has not been illustrated because it is an obvious substitution of a mechanical equivalent.

Owing to the fact that water is admitted when the diaphragm is flexed so as to increase the volume of the hutch a suction producing a downward flow through the screen as well as cross currents is prevented because sufficient water to compensate for the additional volume is admitted through the action of the valve.

Having described the invention what is claimed as new Is: 1. A jig of the character described, comprising a tank having a feed inlet and a discharge outlet determining a liquid' level therein, a screen dividing the tank into a sluice compartment and a hutch therebelow, means for alternately increasing and decreasirg the capacity of the hutch in a cyclic movement, and a driven valveelement cooperative with said means for introducing into the hutch pressure fluid in an amount corresponding to the capacity increase, said valve-element and said means being relatively timed to introduce said fluid during the capacity increase.

2. A jig of the character described, comprising a tank having a feed inlet and a discharge outlet determining a liquid level therein, a screen dividing the tank into a sluice compartment and a hutch therebelow, a reciprocatory flexible diaphragm for alternately increasing and decreasing the capacity of the hutch, and a driven valve-element synchronized therewith for introducing into the hutch pressure fluid in an amount corresponding to the capacity increase, said valve-element and said means being relatively timed to introduce said fluid during the capacity increase.

3. A jig of the character described, comprising a tank having a feed inlet and a discharge outlet determining a liquid level therein, a screen dividing the tank into a sluice compartment and a hutch therebelow, means for alternately increasing and decreasing the capacity of the hutch in a cyclic movement, a driven valve-element cooperative with said means for introducing into the hutch pressure fluid in an amount corresponding to the capacity increase, said valveelement and said means being relatively timed to introduce said fluid during the capacity increase, and a control to vary the quantity of fluid admitted to the hutch.

4. A jig of the character described, comprising a tank having a feed inlet and a discharge outlet determining a liquid level therein, a screen dividing the tank into a sluice compartment and a hutch therebelow, a reciprocatory flexible dia)hragm limiting the catpcity of the hutch, a nechanism for reciprocating the diaphragm rhereby to increase and decrease the capacity )f the hutch, and a driven valve-element co)perative with said means for introducing into he hutch pressure fluid in an amount corresponding to the capacity increase, said valveelement and said means being relatively timed ;o introduce said fluid during the capacity increase. 5. A jig of the character described, comprising a tank having a feed inlet and a discharge outlet determining a liquid level therein, a screen dividing the tank into a sluice compartment and a hutch therebelow, means for alternately increasing and decreasing the capacity of the hutch in a cyclic movement, and a driven valve-element cooperative with and timed relative to said means for introducing into the hutch at each capacity increase, an amount of pressure fluid equal to the increase.

6. A jig of the character described, comprising a tank having a feed inlet and a discharge outlet determining a liquid level therein, a screen dividing the tank into a sluice compartment and a hutch therebelow, means operable by a rotary shaft for alternately increasing and decreasing the capacity of the hutch in a cyclic movement, and a mechanism including a driven valveelement operable by rotation of the shaft and timed with relation to said means for introducing a pressure fluid into the hutch during each capacity increase thereof.

7. A jig of the character described, comprising a tank for fluids, an upright partition terminating at a distance from the bottom of the tank and dividing the tank into communicating chambers, there being a feed inlet and a discharge outlet in one of said chambers determining a liquid level in the tank, a flexible diaphragm in the other chamber at a lower elevation than the outlet and defining the upper end of said chamber, a screen in the discharge chamber providing a sluice compartment and a thereto lower hutch for settling solids, means for flexing the diaphragm whereby to increase and decrease the capacity of the hutch, and a driven valve-element operating with said means, and timed with respect thereto, to introduce a pressure fluid into the diaphragm chamber at each capacity increase.

8. A jig of the character described, comprising a tank having two communicating chambers, one of the chambers having a feed inlet and a discharge outlet determining a liquid level in the tank, a reciprocating closure for the other chamber below the liquid level in the tank to alternately increase and decrease the capacity of the hutch, a screen-element in the discharge chamber dividing the tank into an upper sluice compartment and a lower hutch for settling solids, and means including a driven valve-element timed relative to said reciprocating closure to admit a pressure fluid to the closed chamber at each capacity increase. 9. A jig of the character described, comprising a tank having a feed inlet and a discharge outlet determining a liquid level therein, two spaced screens in the upper portion of the tank, the uppermost screen being spaced from the discharge side of the tank to provide a passage to the discharge, and the lowermost screen being of finer mesh than the upper screen and dividing the tank into a sluice compartment and a hutch therebelow, means for increasing and decreasing the capacity of the hutch and a driven valve-element cooperative with said means, and timed relative thereto, to introduce into the hutch at each capacity increase, pressure fluid in an amount corresponding to the capacity increase, to thereby effect an upward flow through the screens and passage to the discharge.

10. A jig of the character described, comprising two tanks in side-by-side arrangement, each of the tanks having a feed inlet and a discharge outlet determining a liquid level therein, the discharge outlet of one tank extending into and providing the feed inlet for the second tank, a screen in each tank dividing the same into a sluice compartment and a hutch therebelow, a reciprocatory flexible diaphragm in each hutch for alternately increasing and decreasing its capacity, a mechanism connected with both diaphragms for moving the same simultaneously in opposite directions, and means including a driven valve-element so timed with respect to said mechanism as to introduce into the respective hutches at each capacity increase, pressure fluid in an amount corresponding to the capacity increase.

11. A jig of the character described, comprising a tank having a feed inlet and a. discharge outlet determining a liquid level therein, a screen dividing the tank into a sluice compartment and a hutch therebelow, means for alternately increasing and decreasing the capacity of the hutch in a cyclic movement, mechanism including a driven valve-element cooperative with said means for introducing pressure fluid into the hutch in an amount corresponding to the capacity increase, and a regulator controlling the flow of pressure fluid to the hutch, said valve-element and said means being relatively timed to introduce said fluid during the capacity increase.

12. A jig of the character described, comprising a tank having a feed inlet and a discharge outlet determining a liquid level therein, a screen dividing the tank into a sluice compartment and a hutch therebelow, means for alternately increasing and decreasing the capacity of the hutch in a cyclic movement, and a valve-controlled system including a driven valve-element cooperative with said means for introducing pressure fluid into the hutch in-an amount corresponding to the capacity increase, said valve-element and said means being relatively timed to introduce said fluid during the capacity increase. LELAND H. LOGUE.