Title:
Fountain pen
United States Patent 2119645


Abstract:
This invention relates to fountain pens and it has, as its primary object, to provide improved means for securing the ink-sack to the so-called "section" which holds the pen point and for securing the section in the barrel. As heretofore constructed, the section has been formed with a shank...



Inventors:
Pearson, Eric G.
Application Number:
US8798236A
Publication Date:
06/07/1938
Filing Date:
06/29/1936
Assignee:
Pearson, Eric G.
Primary Class:
Other Classes:
285/241, 285/243
International Classes:
B43K5/04
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Description:

This invention relates to fountain pens and it has, as its primary object, to provide improved means for securing the ink-sack to the so-called "section" which holds the pen point and for securing the section in the barrel.

As heretofore constructed, the section has been formed with a shank of two diameters adapted to be inserted into the barrel. The open end of the ink-sack was fitted to, and cemented upon, the inner and smaller diameter while the larger diameter was frictionally secured in the open end of the barrel.

That prior construction has not been entirely satisfactory, due to the fact that, under the 156 screwing action of the pen cap, the section would sometimes be turned relative to the barrel. Inasmuch as the ink-sack was cemented to the section, one end thereof also would be turned. It frequently happened that the ink-sack would either adhere to the inner surface of the barrel or catch upon the filler mechanism, with the result that the turning of the section, and the end of the sack secured thereto, would cause twisting of the ink-sack. This would prevent the ink from 256 flowing and. therefore, render the pen useless.

This invention has effectively overcome that difficulty by providing an improved and simplified construction which prevents relative rotation between the section and the barrel, and renders the cementing of the bag to the section unnecessary.

A drawing illustrating a preferred form of this invention, and several modifications thereof, has been annexed as a part of this disclosure, and in such drawing Figure 1 is a side elevation, partly in section, of a fountain pen, embodying the preferred form of the invention.

Figure 2 is a disassembled side view of various elements shown in Figure 1.

Figure 3 is an end view of a split sack-retaining sleeve later to be described.

Figure 4 is a detail view of a modified form of point-supporting section.

Figure 5 is an enlarged detail sectional view disclosing a modification of the construction shown in Figure 1, and embodying the pointsupporting section shown in Figure 4.

Figures 6 and 7 are side and end views, respectively, of the sack-retaining sleeve embodied in the construction disclosed in Figure 5.

Figures 8 and 9 are side and end views, respectively, of a second modified form of sack-retaining sleeve, and Figure 10 is a view similar to Figure 8 showing the sleeve constricted.

Referring more specifically to the drawing, and first to the construction shown in Figures 1, 2 and 3, the invention is disclosed as embodied in a fountain pen comprising a barrel I, a section 2 which carries a feed 3 and pen-point 4, and a collapsible rubber ink-sack 5. One end of the ink-sack is closed and the free open end 5a thereof is stretched and fitted upon the reduced inner end 2a of the section 2. In this construction the portion of the section which projects into the barrel is of uniform diameter and is shorter than in prior constructions while the ink-sack has approximately twice the bearing thereon.

After the open end of the sack has been stretched and placed upon the end 2a of the section 2 a split sleeve 6 is placed thereabout.

The bag 5, sleeve 6 and end 2a are then inserted within the open end of the barrel as shown in Figure 1. The parts are so proportioned that their insertion in the barrel causes the split sleeve S to be constricted about the end portion of the sack, thereby forming an ink-tight joint between the sack and the portion 2a of the pointsupporting section, without the use of cement or 2!the like. The sleeve 6 also forms a tight joint with the inner wall of the barrel i. Any tendency of the section 2 to turn causes the sleeve 6 to open slightly whereupon the edges 6a of the slot 6b more securely grip the inner surface of the barrel. Thus, through the action of the sleeve 6, the sack 5 is securely fastened to the section 2 and the section is locked against turning in the barrel.

It will readily be perceived that not only does this construction securely hold the parts against relative movement but also that the parts do not require the precision in manufacture required in prior constructions in which the section was fitted directly within the bore of the barrel. This is true because of the fact that the rubber sack 5 may readily be compressed about .005 of an inch, thus giving considerable tolerance as compared with prior constructions in which the section had to be fitted in the barrel with great precision.

In such prior constructions, if the section was the least bit too small it would turn in the barrel.

If it was slightly too large insertion thereof into the barrel would cause one of two defects, it would either split the barrel or it would expand the barrel so that the cap would not fit thereon.

The present invention obviates both of these defects and permits the parts to be completely machined before they are assembled with the assurance that they will fit after assembly.

In the modification shown in Figures 4 to 7, the reduced end 7a of the section 1, which corresponds to the section 2 of Figure 1, is formed, intermediate its ends, with an annular groove 7b and the split sack-retaining sleeve 8 is provided with a complemental annular depression 8a adapted, when the parts are assembled, to force the sack 5 into the groove lb as shown in Figure 5. This securely locks the parts against axial movement and facilitates withdrawing of the parts from the barrel, when necessary.

Figures 8 and 9 show still another form of split sack-retaining sleeve. In this form the sleeve 9 is split diagonally as indicated at 9x, instead of lengthwise as in Figure 2. This construction permits a materially greater degree of compression for a given width of slot, as the sleeve may be compressed, not only until the edges 9a and 9b of the slot abut, but further, as indicated in Figure 10, the parts moving axially as well as circumferentially after the opposite walls 9a and 9b of the slot have been brought into contact. From the foregoing it will be apparent that I have provided an improved and simplified means for securing an ink-sack to the point-supporting section of a fountain pen and for securing the section within the barrel. It will also be per3., ceived that this construction may be more readily assembled than prior constructions, that no cementing of the sack is required, and that, when assembled, the undesirable twisting of the section and sack relative to the barrel will be obvi35-ated.

Furthermore it will be apparent that, as the portion of the section which is inserted into the barrel is materially shorter than as heretofore constructed, a correspondingly longer ink-sack may be used, thereby proportionately increasing the ink capacity of the pen.

Having thus described the invention what I claim and desire to secure by Letters Patent of the United States is: 1. A fountain pen comprising a barrel; a pointsupporting section having a reduced portion, of uniform diameter, arranged within said barrel; an ink-sack fitted upon said reduced portion; and a diagonally split member surrounding said reduced portion and the sack thereabout and adapted to be compressed by insertion within said barrel to clamp said sack upon said reduced portion, said split member also serving to frictionally retain said section in said barrel.

2. A fountain pen comprising a barrel; a pointsupporting section having a reduced portion located within said barrel; an ink-sack having one end fitted upon said portion; and a sleeve, split in the general direction of its length but at an angle to its axis, surrounding said end of the sack and the reduced portion of said section, said sleeve frictionally engaging the inner surface of said barrel and serving to clamp said bag to said section and to prevent rotation of said section in said barrel.

3. A fountain pen comprising a barrel; a pointsupporting section having a portion arranged within said barrel, said portion being provided, intermediate its ends, with a groove; an ink-sack having one end fitted upon said portion; and a compressible clamping sleeve tightly fitted within said barrel and surrounding said sack and portion, said sleeve having a depression complemental to said groove and adapted when compressed by said barrel to force a portion of said sack into said groove, thereby to secure said section and sack together, said sleeve also serving to frictionally secure said section in said barrel.

4. A fountain pen comprising a barrel; a pointsupporting section having a portion arranged within said barrel; an ink-sack having an end fitted upon said portion; and a diagonally split compressible sleeve surrounding said portion and the end of said sack fitted thereon, said split sleeve normally being of larger diameter than the diameter of the bore in said barrel but being adapted to be constricted to an extent greater than the space between the walls of the split therein and to be inserted into said bore, the constriction of said sleeve serving to clamp said sack to said point-supporting section.

ERIC G. PEARSON.