Title:
Fastener
United States Patent 2100648


Abstract:
This invention relates to improvements in fasteners and particularly to a cord fastener for securing the slat raising cord to the lower slat of a Venetian blind. As is well known to those versed in the art, Venetian blinds usually include a plurality of slats which lie upon ladder tapes, the...



Inventors:
Lawson, Gottfrid C.
Carl, Lindquist
Application Number:
US5554035A
Publication Date:
11/30/1937
Filing Date:
12/21/1935
Assignee:
Lawson, Gottfrid C.
Carl, Lindquist
Primary Class:
Other Classes:
24/625, 160/178.1R
International Classes:
E06B9/388
View Patent Images:



Description:

This invention relates to improvements in fasteners and particularly to a cord fastener for securing the slat raising cord to the lower slat of a Venetian blind.

As is well known to those versed in the art, Venetian blinds usually include a plurality of slats which lie upon ladder tapes, the purposes of the tapes being to supply the proper vertical spacing between the slats as well as providing means for tilting the slats to close the blind. The blinds are raised by a pair of cords which extend over rollers in the top of the blind and down through apertures in the slats and have their ends secured to the bottom slat. Heretofore the raising cords have been secured to the bottom slat by extending them through holes in the slat and forming ,knots on the underside of the slat or by nailing the ends of the cord to the slat.

Many of the prior cord fastening arrangements had certain features which were undesirable.

For instance, it was often difficult, if not impossible, to unknot the cord for removing the slats, making it necessary to cut the cord to remove the slats. Should the cord be unknotted it is usually curled into various formations, making it difficult to thread through the slats. The cord being heavy, the connection of the cord to the bottom slat was stiff and limited the tilting movement of the slat.

In our present invention, the deficiencies present in the prior art devices have been eliminated; 'and a connection is provided which is very simple to operate; economical to manufacture and where the cord may be quickly and easily removed 38 and replaced without injury to either cord or slat, mahkng it possible to. quickly and easily remove the slats for cleaning, painting or repair.

The invention may also be quickly and easily applied to existing blinds.

Another feature of our invention resides in an improved hollow slat for blinds which is particularly adapted for use with our improved fastener and in which access may readily be had to the Interior.

Still other advantages and objects of the invention and the invention Itself, will become more apparent from the following description of an embodiment thereof which, together with the accompanying drawing, forms a part of this specifl60 cation.

In the drawing: Pig. 1 is a view partly in elevation and partly in section of an embodiment of our invention; Fig. 2 is a similar view with the certain parts vs rotated 90°; ig. 3 is an elevational view of the cord tip member; Fig. 4 is a similar view to Fig. 2 showing the position taken by the parts during separation thereof; Fig. 5 is a view showing how the slat may tilt relative to the holder; Pig. 6 is a fragmentary plan view of a portion of a slat showing the slat socket; Fig. 7 is a cross section of our improved slat; and ig. 8 is an enlarged fragmentary view of a part of Fg. 7.

Generally the fastener includes a male member secured to the end of the cord to form a tip, and which is insertable in a female member comprising a socket secured to or integral with the slat.

The tip comprises a cylindrical base portion I adapted to be secured to the end of the cord 2 by crimping or the like. A shank 3 of thin flat metal extends downward from the base and carries on its end a head which includes a curved end portion 4. Laterally extending shoulders 5 extend inward from the curved extremities of the head to meet the shank at right angles thereto. The head and shank may be divided by a kerf 6 which extends through the head Into the shank 3, permitting the opposite head portions to be bent or flexed toward or away from each other. Bending the heads toward each other decreases the overall size of the head. It is to be understood, however, that the kerf may be eliminated.

The socket includes a sheet metal member adapted to be secured over a recess in the slat, or if the slat is metal as illustrated, the socket may be formed integral with the slat.

The metal is deformed to provide a substantially elliptical zone 10 with the long axis of the zone extending transversely across the slat; the metal of the zone slants downward from the edge of the zone toward a rhombus or diamond shaped aperture II at the center. The aperture is longer from two opposite corners than from the other two corners and is so disposed that the longest part of the opening extends transversely across the slat.

The opposite corners of the aperture which extend lengthwise of the slat intersect the slanting side walls of the zone and cause the zone to have what is in effect a transverse groove 12 across the zone on the underside extending lengthwise of the slat.

The design of the tip is such that the tip cannot be removed from the socket except in one of two like.postions. This s accomplibed by form- I Ing the head by arcs whose centers are at the intersections of the shoulders 5 and shank 3 with the radii of the arcs equal to the largest distance from opposite corners of the aperture 11. This is best shown in Fig. 3 where the arc 4a forming one-half of the curved head has the intersection 5a of the shoulder 5 and shank 3 as the center.

The arc 4b is formed in a similar manner with the point 5b as the center. The dimensions of the aperture II as previously stated are formed to coincide with the dimensions of the tip; that is the distance between the opposed corners of the aperture lying along the longitudinal center line of the slat and transverse to the zone 10 is slightly larger than the breadth of the shank 3 at the shoulders 5. This permits free movement of the shank therethrough. The distance between the other two corners which lie in a line extending transversely across the slat and longitudinally in the bottom of the zone 10 is the same length as the radii which is used to form the arcs of the head 4.

To insert the tip in the socket it is presented edgewise to the slat and one of the corners 7 of the head is first inserted in the aperture I until the point 5b or 5a contacts with the edge of the aperture and the head extends across the aperture at the aperture's longest dimension. The point 5b of the tip is then held in contact with the corner of the aperture and rotated to a vertical position as shown in Figs. 2 and 4. Since the distance from the point 5b to the edge4boftheheadisequal to the distance across the aperture, the head may be rotated and the curved edge 4b just clears the edge of the aperture. When the tip reaches an upright position the shoulders 5 of the tip are both below the edge of the aperture as seen in Fig. 2. The tip may now be rotated 90° around its longitudinal axis (Fig. 1) which permits the shoulders 5 to slide up into the groove 12. Actually when the device is assembled it slides naturally into the groove, centering the cord in the center of the slat, the parts assuming the proper relation for effective operation.

By this construction and carrying out the proportional dimensions described, the tip can only be removed by' exactly reversing the insertion operation just described. Inasmuch as the aperture is longer in one direction than the other, it can only be removed through the longer side of the opening since the other distance is shorter than the radii forming the head, and since the groove 12 tends to keep the tip turned in the direction of the shortest dimension there is no chance of accidental removal.

We have found in actual practice that due to the kerf 6 the longest dimension of the aperture II may be made slightly less than the length of the radii forming the heads. The amount less being the distance across the kerf between the head portions. In this instance the operator presses the tip in the direction of the arrow R (Fig. 4) against the edge of the aperture to force the head portions into contact with each other, closing the gap formed by the kerf and decreasing the overall size of the head; the tip may then be rotated into the socket as previously described and when released expands to its normal size.

By this arrangement any possible dislodging of the tip from the socket is prevented.

Fig. 5 shows clearly how the tip and socket permit extreme tilting of the slat. The shoulders 6 lie in the groove 12 and form the pivot point for the slat. The shank may lie below the plane : of the surrounding portion of the slat within the zone 10, permitting the slat to be rotated closer to the cord 2.

The tip also provides a convenient means for threading the cord through the slats.

The slat 15 Illustrated is made of sheet metal and is of substantially C-shaped cross section with the free edges 19 curved inwardly. It may be desirable to close the bottom of the slat with a metal strip to lend the appearance of solidity and this may be accomplished as best shown in in Figs. 7 and 8. In effecting this it is desirable to have the:strip fit close to the slat and at the same time reduce the frictional engagement and increase the manufacturing tolerances to permit easy insertion and removal of the strip which removal permits access to the interior of the slat.

The strip which closes the bottom comprises a flat body 16, the edges IT of which are bent back upon the body and then outward to form the groove 18. The free edges 19 of the slat which are, as previously explained turned in, slightly toward the upper plane of the slat are adapted to slide within the groove 18. When the edges 19 of the slat are in the groove 18 they engage the groove at two points, namely, the outside edge 18a and the inside portion at 18b. Thus the inherent resiliency of the material of the slat provides a resilient engagement for the slat and closure member, permitting the closure member to completely seal the open space, but decreasing the frictional engagement between the two and allowing easy separation and engagement of the parts.

The end of the slat may be closed by a cupshaped member 20 conforming to the end of the slat.

Having thus described our invention in an embodiment thereof, we are aware that numerous and extensive departures may be made therefrom, but without departing from the spirit thereof, and the disclosures in the drawing are not intended as a limitation upon the scope thereof.

We claim: 1. In a slat for a Venetian blind comprising a section of sheet metal bent in the form of a channel and having oppositely disposed inwardly extending free edges, a cover plate for closing the gap between said edges comprising a flat strip of metal formed to provide grooves on its edge adapted to be slidably engaged with said free channel edges.

2. In a slat for Venetian blinds comprising a sheet metal body of open channel formation and having the free edges curved and extending to- .55 ward each other, a cover for closing the opening in said channel including a metal strip, grooves provided on the edge of the strip comprising the metal of the strip folded backward upon itself and then outwardly in spaced relation, each curved free edge of the channel engaging a groove of the strip tangentially to the edge and having its free edge engaging the outwardly extending portion to provide a close flexible engagement between the strip and the channel. 3. In a slat for Venetian blinds comprising a sheet metal body of open channel formation and having the free edges curved inwardly and extending toward each other, a cover for closing the opening in said channel including a metal strip, grooves provided on the edge of the strip comprising the metal of the strip folded backward upon itself and then curving outwardly in spaced relation to the first mentioned bend, each curved free edge of the channel engaging the 76 first mentioned bend tangentially and having its free edge engaging the outwardly curved portion to provide a close flexible engagement between the strip and the channel.

4. In a slat for Venetian blinds comprising a sheet metal body formed to provide an open channel having the free edge portions extending toward each other and curved inwardly, a cover for closing the opening in said channel including a flat metal strip, U-shaped grooves provided on the edge of the strip comprising the metal of the strip folded backward upon itself and then bent outwardly in spaced relation to said first fold, each free edge of said channel adapted to engage in one of said grooves contacting therewith tangentially to the first mentioned bend and having its free edge bearing flexibly against the outwardly extending portion of the groove to provide a close flexible engagement between the strip and the channel.

5. In combination with a Venetian blind, a fastener for securing a cord to a bottom slat comprising a tip for the end of the cord having a head, a socket in the slat formed to provide an aperture to receive and having walls to retain the tip in the slat.

6. In a device of the class described, a tip adapted to be secured on the end of a cord, a shank for the tip and a head carried on the end of the shank, a slat, a socket in the slat having a wall formed to provide, an aperture, said tip adapted to be insettable through said aperture, said head adapted to engage the socket walls adjacent the aperture to retain the tip in the socket.

7. In a device of the class described, a tip adapted to be connected to the end of a cord, and having a shank and a head on the end of the shank, a slat having a socket therein formed by an indentation in the top wall of the slat, said indentation having an aperture centrally thereof for receiving said tip.

8. In a device of the class described, a cord tip having a shank and a head on the end of the shank, said head being formed with a kerf dividing the head into like parts, a slat having a socket therein formed by an indentation in the top wall of the slot, said identation having an aperture centrally thereof for receiving said tip, said tip being insertable through the aperture by closing the slot formed by the kerf to reduce the overall dimensions of the head.

9. In a device of the class described, a tip adapted to be secured to the end of a cord, a S5 shank depending from the tip, and a head carried thereby, a slat having a socket therein formed by an indentation in the top wall of the slat, said indentation having an aperture centrally thereof for receiving said tip, said tip being insertable through said aperture by engaging the underside of said head against the edge of the aperture and rotating the same to an upright position, said tip being non-removable from the aperture when in the upright position. 10. In a device of the class described, a tip adapted to be secured to the end of a cord, a shank depending from the tip, and a head carried thereby, a kerf in the head dividing the same into two spaced parts, a flat sheet of metal having an indentation extending downwardly below the plane of the rest of the sheet and formed at the center of the indentation with an aperture, said tip being insertable through said aperture by engaging the underside of said head against the edge of the aperture and pressing the separated head parts toward each other to close the kerf, and rotating the same to an upright position, said kerf being adapted to expand to normal size to render the tip non-removable from the aperture when in the upright position. 11. In a device of the class described, a tip adapted to be disposed on the end of a cord and including a shank with a head on the end thereof, 'the extremity of the head being arcuate, a thin sheet of material having a downwardly extending boss formed at the center with a noncircular aperture, said tip being removable only through the longest dimension of the aperture.

12. In a device of the class described, a tip adapted to be secured to a cord, a thin shank on the tip and a head on the end of the shank having an arcuate extremity and shoulders joining the shank at the base of the head, a slat having a socket for receiving and holding the tip formed therein providing an aperture longer in one direction than the other, the arcs forming said head having radii equal to or less than the longest distance across the aperture.

13. In a device of the class described, a tip adapted to be secured to a cord, a thin shank for the tip and a head on the end of the shank having an arcuate extremity and shoulders joining the shank at the base of the head, means to hold said tip to a slat including a socket for the head comprising an indentation slanting downward and formed at its center to provide an aperture longer in one direction than the other, the arcs forming said head having their centers adjacent the opposite side of the head at the juncture of the head and shank and the largest distance across the aperture being equal to or less than double the length of the radii forming said arcs.

14. In a device of the class described, a metal tip comprising a socket for attachment to a cord, a thin shank extending from the socket and having a head on the end of the shank, said head having arcuate extremities with shoulders at right angles to the shank at the base of the head, means to hold said tip to a slat including a socket for the head comprising a downwardly extending indentation formed at its center to provide a rhombus shaped aperture, the arcs forming said head having their centers adjacent the opposite side of the head at the juncture of the head and shank and the largest distance across the aperture being equal to or less than double the length of the radii forming said arcs.

15. In a device of the class described, a tip adapted to be secured to a cord, a thin shank on the tip and a head on the end of the shank having an arcuate extremity and shoulders joining the shank at the base of the head, a kerf extending through the head into the shank, means to hold said tip to a slat including a socket for the head comprising an indentation slanting downward and formed at its center to provide a rhombus shaped aperture, the arcs forming said head having their centers adjacent the opposite side of the head at the juncture of the head and shank and the largest distance across the aperture being equal to or less than double the length of the radii forming said arcs.

16. In a device of the class described, a tip adapted to be secured to a cord, a thin shank for the tip and a head on the end of the shank having an arcuate extremity and shoulders joining the shank at the base of the head, a kerf extending through the head into the shank and dividing the head into equal parts, means to, is hold said tip to a slat Including a socket for tne head comprising an elliptical indentation slanting downward and formed at its center to provide a rhombus shaped aperture with the longest dimension from opposite corners extending longitudinally of said indentations, the arcs forming said head having their centers adjacent the opposite side of the head at the juncture of the head and shank and the largest distance across the aperture being less than doublef the length of the radii forming said arcs.

17. In combination with a Venetian blind, a bottom rail or slat therefor, means to secure a cord to said rail including a socket in the rail and a tip for the cord, said socket being formed of a thin metal wall having a substantially oval indentation extending transversely of the slat, an opening in the lower-most portion of said indentation extending across the indentation, the edges of the metal at said opening slanting upward longitudinally of the slat and downward transversely thereof, said tip comprising a base adapted to be clamped to a cord and having a flat shank extending therefrom and ending in a flat head of an arcuate end formation, a kerf extending through the head into the shank, said head adapted to be insertable in said opening and to engage in the opening crosswise to the direction of the indentation and to ride upward into the notches formed by the upward slanting portions of said opening.

18. In a fastener for securing cords to the bottom rail or slat of a Venetian blind, including a thin metal member on the upper wall of the rail formed to provide a socket comprising an indentation of substantially elliptical plan extending transversely across the rail, and provided with an opening of substantially rhombus shape with the acute angles bisected by the longer axis of the ellipse and with the edges of the opening that converge to form the obtuse angle extending upward to provide oppositely disposed notches In alignment with each other and the longitudinal center of the rail, a tip for insertion in said socket comprising a base adapted to be fixed to the end of a cord and having a flat shank extending therefrom and terminating in a head having lateral extending portions, a kerf extending from the extremity of the head into the shank, said tip adapted to be inserted into said opening and said laterally extending portions adapted to ride in said notches to provide a fulcrum to permit said rail to tilt.

19. In combination with a Venetian blind, a bottom slat therefor comprising a aecton of sheet metal bent in the form of a channel and having oppositely disposed inwardly extending free edges, a cover plate for closing the gap between said edges comprising a flat strip of metal formed to provide grooves on its edge adapted to be slidably engaged with said free channel edges, a fastener for securing a cord to said channel section including a tip for the end of the cord having a head, said channel section having a socket formed to provide an aperture to receive and having walls to retain the tip in the slat.

COTPTRID C. LAWSON.

CARL LINDQUIST.

Patent No. 2,100,648.

CERTIFICATE OF CORRECTION.

GOTTFRID C. LAWSON, ET AL.

November 30, 1957.

It is hereby certified that error appears in the printed specification of the above numbered patent requiring correction as follows: Page 3, first column, line 48, claim 8, for the word "slot" read slat; page 4, second column, line 20, claim 19, for "secton" read rection; and that the said Letters Patent should be read with these corrections there in that the same ma - P 4 ri Signed and sealed this Ist day of February, A. D. 1938.

Henry Van Arsdale, Acting Commissioner of Patents.

(Seal) y n orm o the record of t e hold said tip to a slat Including a socket for tne head comprising an elliptical indentation slanting downward and formed at its center to provide a rhombus shaped aperture with the longest dimension from opposite corners extending longitudinally of said indentations, the arcs forming said head having their centers adjacent the opposite side of the head at the juncture of the head and shank and the largest distance across the aperture being less than doublef the length of the radii forming said arcs.

17. In combination with a Venetian blind, a bottom rail or slat therefor, means to secure a cord to said rail including a socket in the rail and a tip for the cord, said socket being formed of a thin metal wall having a substantially oval indentation extending transversely of the slat, an opening in the lower-most portion of said indentation extending across the indentation, the edges of the metal at said opening slanting upward longitudinally of the slat and downward transversely thereof, said tip comprising a base adapted to be clamped to a cord and having a flat shank extending therefrom and ending in a flat head of an arcuate end formation, a kerf extending through the head into the shank, said head adapted to be insertable in said opening and to engage in the opening crosswise to the direction of the indentation and to ride upward into the notches formed by the upward slanting portions of said opening.

18. In a fastener for securing cords to the bottom rail or slat of a Venetian blind, including a thin metal member on the upper wall of the rail formed to provide a socket comprising an indentation of substantially elliptical plan extending transversely across the rail, and provided with an opening of substantially rhombus shape with the acute angles bisected by the longer axis of the ellipse and with the edges of the opening that converge to form the obtuse angle extending upward to provide oppositely disposed notches In alignment with each other and the longitudinal center of the rail, a tip for insertion in said socket comprising a base adapted to be fixed to the end of a cord and having a flat shank extending therefrom and terminating in a head having lateral extending portions, a kerf extending from the extremity of the head into the shank, said tip adapted to be inserted into said opening and said laterally extending portions adapted to ride in said notches to provide a fulcrum to permit said rail to tilt.

19. In combination with a Venetian blind, a bottom slat therefor comprising a aecton of sheet metal bent in the form of a channel and having oppositely disposed inwardly extending free edges, a cover plate for closing the gap between said edges comprising a flat strip of metal formed to provide grooves on its edge adapted to be slidably engaged with said free channel edges, a fastener for securing a cord to said channel section including a tip for the end of the cord having a head, said channel section having a socket formed to provide an aperture to receive and having walls to retain the tip in the slat.

COTPTRID C. LAWSON.

CARL LINDQUIST.

Patent No. 2,100,648.

CERTIFICATE OF CORRECTION.

GOTTFRID C. LAWSON, ET AL.

November 30, 1957.

It is hereby certified that error appears in the printed specification of the above numbered patent requiring correction as follows: Page 3, first column, line 48, claim 8, for the word "slot" read slat; page 4, second column, line 20, claim 19, for "secton" read rection; and that the said Letters Patent should be read with these corrections there in that the same ma - P 4 ri Signed and sealed this Ist day of February, A. D. 1938.

Henry Van Arsdale, Acting Commissioner of Patents.

(Seal) y n orm o the record of t e