Title:
Detection of bad coins
United States Patent 2096647


Abstract:
The present invention relates to, and has for its object the provision of, a. novel method of and means for distinguishing between and separately disposing of genuine and spurious coins. In testing the validity of coins in accordance with the invention, a number of sharpened, pointed or edged...



Inventors:
Leonard, Pettersson Hjalmar
Application Number:
US5489335A
Publication Date:
10/19/1937
Filing Date:
12/17/1935
Assignee:
Patentakticbolaget, Ambia
Primary Class:
International Classes:
G07D5/02
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Description:

The present invention relates to, and has for its object the provision of, a. novel method of and means for distinguishing between and separately disposing of genuine and spurious coins. In testing the validity of coins in accordance with the invention, a number of sharpened, pointed or edged members are pressed against the coin to be tested with such an adjusted pressure that when soft metals, for instance lead, tin, type metal, non-alloyed copper or the like, are encountered the points or edges force their way into and fasten or stick to the coin so that the latter becomes held by the points or edged whereas, on the other hand, when coins of harder metals or alloys, such as silver, copper or nickel alloys, are tested, the points or edges are not able to enter the coin, the result being that, when the sharpened members are moved away from the testing position, they bring with them coins of soft metal but leave behind coins of hard metal. In this way the spurious coins may be distinguished and separated from the genuine coins.

The invention will be more fully understood upon reference to, the accompanying drawings, wherein is illustrated, by way of example only, one particular mechanical device for carrying the invention into effect. Various other objects and features of the invention will also become apparent upon a consideration of the detailed description of the embodiment thereof which follows.

Referring now to the drawings, wherein like reference characters indicate like parts throughout the several views: Figure 1 is a vertical section through one form of coin testing device embodying the present invention while Figure 2 is a section through the same device but with the parts in other positions, a portion of the device being shown in full in both figures.

Figure 3 is a vertical projection viewed from the line 3-3 in Figure 1, whereas Figure 4 is a vertical projection viewed from the line 4-4 in Figure 1.

Figure 5 is a vertical projection, and partly a section on the line 5-5 in Figure 7, of an alarm or signalling device co-operating with the coin testing device shown in Figures 1 to 4.

Figure 6 is a horizontal section on the line 6-6 in Figure 5.

Figure 7 is a vertical projection viewed from the line 7-7 in Figure 5.

Figure 8 is a circuit diagram of the alarm or signalling mechanism of Figures 5-7.

In the embodiment of the invention illustrated in the drawings, a coin chute 3 is provided through which pass the coins 1, 2 to be tested and in which are disposed certain detents adapted to control the passage of the coins therethrough and the locating of the same in testing position. A yoke 4 is fixed laterally of the coin chute 3 and a swingable bracket 5 is pivoted thereon. In thd position shown in Figure 1 a projection 6 of the bracket 5 extends horizontally through an aperture T in the coin chute into the path of the coin I. The bracket 5 is also provided with another horizontal projection 8 which extends through another aperture 9 in the coin chute but does not reach into the path of the coin I in the position shown in Figure 1. The bracket 5 is further provided with a vertical extension 10 which carries a stud II extending laterally therefrom at right angles to projections 6 and 8. This stud is freely movable in an elongated aperture 12 in a slide 13 which is slidably mounted at 14 near the edge of the coin chute and is provided with a stud 15 extending lengthwise into the coin chute. Between the stud 15 and a quadrangular projecting arm 16 a spring 17, Figures 2 and 3, is stretched which tends to hold the slide 13 and the stud 15 in their left-hand positions shown in Figure 1, the stud 15 then projecting into the path of and supporting a coin 2 in testing position.

The front wall of coin chute 3 is provided with a lateral aperture 18 of a somewhat larger diameter than the coins to be tested. The chute 3 is in direct communication with a chute 19 positioned for genuine coins and in indirect communication through aperture 18 with a chute 20 for bad or spurious coins. The testing device proper consists of a slidable block-like member 24 on which are mounted a plurality of pointed or edged members such as teeth 22, 23 the operative portions of which are formed with such angles and surfaces that, upon the points entering into a coin of soft metal, they are firmly retained by means of friction against, and/or adhesion to, the walls of the depressions in the coin caused by the entering of the points.

For this purpose the angularities of the surfaces of the coin penetrating portions of teeth 22, 23 with respect to the axes thereof are made less than the angular limit for frictional immobility between the material of the teeth and the coin metal according to the well-known principles for a socalled self-locking edge or screw. If points are used they are preferably of conical shape with a very acute angle at the vertex as in a needle. The slide member 24 on which teeth 22, 23 are mounted is provided with a substantially rectangular frame 25 which slides in a suitable guide bracket secured to the front wall of the chute and co-operates with a cam 27 mounted on a rotating shaft 26, rotation of said shaft and cam imparting to the frame 25, the slide 24 and the teeth 22, 23 a reciprocating motion perpendicularly to the flat side of the coin 2 which is held in testing position in the coin chute by stud 15. The shaft 26 may be driven from an electric motor put into operation automatically in a manner well-known in the art when one or more coins are entered into the slots of a coin-freed and/or change giving apparatus of which the present testing device is intended to be a part. Said motor may also be started if and when an operator manipulates a member provided for this purpose.

In order to avoid displacement of the coin 2 from the testing position in a direction either perpendicular to' or parallel with the path of the testing member 24 during the forward motion of said member, the stud 15 is provided to prevent the coin 2 from falling down while a circular disc 28 is positioned opposite the points 22, 23 to prevent an extended forward movement of the coin. The outer edge of the disc 28 is provided with a flange 29 engaging the rear wall of the coin chute and the disc is loaded on its outside by a pressure spring 30 the compression of which can be adjusted by means of the screw 31 threaded into the yoke 4. The pressure exerted by the spring 30 should be such that the teeth 22, 23 can enter into the metal of coin 2 if it is softer than the prescribed limit, but are prevented therefrom when the coin is made of harder, genuine metal. Such an adjustment is quite easy to attain in practice.

A hole in the slide testing member 24 receives a stud 32 formed on and projecting downwardly from a strike-off member 33 in the shape of a disc. In an annular recess 50 in the slide member 24 is disposed an annular spiral spring or the like 49 which yieldingly pushes a number of pins 48, disposed in radial holes in the slide member, into frictional engagement with the stud 32. The strike-off disc 33 has formed therein openings 34 and 35 which register with the teeth 22, 23.

The thickness of the disc 33 is less than the lengths of the teeth 22, 23 so that when the slide member 24 is moved to its extreme lefthand position the teeth 22, 23 reach and engage the coin. At the moment when the teeth 22, 23 first contact the coin there should be a clearance between the rear end surface 36 of the slide member 24 and the strike-off disc 33 of such an amount that if the coin is spurious the teeth may be sunk deeply enough into the coin metal to adhere firmly thereto. In the case of a genuine coin the teeth cannot enter into the coin metal so that instead the spring-loaded disc 28 is dislocated to the left a corresponding distance.

A gear wheel 37 is mounted on the shaft 26 and meshes with another gear 38 secured to a shaft 39 on which a cam disc 40 is mounted. The cam disc 40 is provided with a recess 41 which, in the position shown in Figure 1, is engaged by a lever 42 pivoted at its lower end on a brackSet member fixed to the front wall of the coin chute. The free end of the lever 42 is connected by means of a link 43 with a laterally projecting arm 44 of the swinging bracket 5. A spring 45 tends to hold the lower portion of the bracket 5 in its left-hand position and 'the upper part thereof in its right-hand position so that the arm 42 bears against the cam disc 40.

The device functions in the following way.

With the elements in the positions shown in Figure 1, a coin I entering the coin chute is caught and prevented from falling through the chute by the projection 6 which extends into the path of the coin. Assuming that the motor driving shaft 26 is then started either automatically or manually, said shaft is rotated and, through gears 37 and 38, places shaft 39 in operation.

Rotation of the cam disc 40, compare Figure 2, causes the arm 42 to run up on the cylindrical portion 96 thereof with the result that the link 43 moves the upper end of swinging bracket 5 rearwardly and carries the projection 6 out of the path of the coin I so that the latter is released and drops down. Simultaneously with the swinging out of the projection 6, however, the projection 8 moves into the path of the coin I, catches 2o the latter and holds it in the position shown in Figure 2. Shortly thereafter the recess 41 again comes opposite the arm 42 so that the projection 8 is moved out of and the projection 6 into the coin path. The coin I held by projection 8 then drops down to the testing position indicated by the character 2 in Figure 1 in which it is supported by the stud 15, while at the same time the projection 6 prevents any further coins I from entering. Simultaneously the cam 27 pushes the frame 25, the slide member 24 and the teeth 22, 23 to the extreme left-hand extreme position. During the next revolution of shaft 26 the operation will proceed according to one of the following two alternatives. Alternative 1 If the coin is genuine and of a comparatively hard metal so that the teeth 22, 23 cannot enter into the coin metal, the procedure is as follows. 40 During the rotation of the cam 27 to its extreme left-hand position the teeth 22, 23 push the coin and the wall 28 to the left a short distance against the action of the spring 30. Shortly thereafter the cam releases its engagement with the left-hand portion of the frame 25 and engages instead the right-hand portion thereof, as shown in Figure 2, and moves the slide member 24 away from the chute, thereby releasing the teeth 22, 23 from engagement with the coin. At the same time the arm 10 swings to its extreme right-hand position and carries the pin 15 out of the path of the coin 2, thereby permitting the latter to freely drop down through the chute 19 adapted to receive genuine coins. Alternative 2 If the coin is spurious and of a comparatively soft metal so that the teeth in their extreme left-hand position enter into and fasten or ad- G0 here to the coin metal, the procedure is as follows. The strike-off disc 33 will then be held between the coin 2 and the rear end surface 36 of the slide member 24. During the return motion of the slide, and before reaching the position 05 shown in Figure 2, an abutment surface 46 formed on the disc 33 will come into contact with an abutment surface 47 fixed with respect to the coin chute frame and thereby prevent further forward movement of the strike-off member 33 and the coin 2, leaving said member in the position shown in Figure 2. When the slide member 24 continues its return motion to the position shown in Figure 2, the teeth 22, 23 release their engagement with the coin 2 and the latter drops down through the coin chute 20 adapted to receive spurious coins.

The strike-off member 33 will be unnecessary if the coin is instead directly stopped and released from the testing member at a point above the chute 20 by means of a stationary abutment, such as 47.

If desired, the chute 20 may communicate with a chute 21 cooperating with an alarm device such as that illustrated in Figures 5 to 8. According to the embodiment illustrated, the front wall of the chute 21 is provided with a lateral aperture 51 into which projects a stop abutment 52 carried by a double-armed lever 53, 54. The lever 53, 54 is pivoted at 55 on a suitable bracket or fixed frame portion 56. Two pairs of spring contacts 57, 58 and 59, 60 also extend into the opening 51.

These pairs of contacts constitute the legs of U-shaped plates 61 and 62, respectively, which are fixed at their base portions to, but insulated from, the walls of the coin chute 21 in the event that the latter are not insulated per se. An alarm device, such as a bell 63, is mounted on a suitable bracket or frame portion 64. A clapper 65 is pivoted at the point 66 on the same frame portion and carries an arm 67 co-operating with a pawl 68. The clapper 65 is actuated by a spring 84 so that it is normally held out of contact with the bell 63. An electromagnet 70 of horseshoe type tends to attract the clapper 65 to strike the bell.

The clapper 65 also carries a circuit breaking contact 71 which engages a fixed contact 72 in the inoperative position of the clapper but opens the circuit therethrough in the operative position thereof. The pawl 68 co-operates with a ratchet wheel 69 in such a manner that the latter is advanced one step in the direction of the arrow in Figure 5 at each reciprocation of the clapper 65.

A ratchet 73 for preventing back slippage of the wheel 69 is pivoted at 74 on the frame portion 56.

The opposite end of the rachet 73 is jointedly connected with a link 75 the opposite end of which is jointedly connected with the arm 53 at the point 76. On the ratchet wheel is secured a pin 77 so disposed in relation to the arm 54 that the latter projects into the path of the pin. The ratchet wheel alsocarries an adjustable disc 78whichis secured thereto by screws 79 but may be angularly displaced in relation thereto due to the provision of slots 80 through which the screws extend. On the disc 78 there is also provided a pin 81 co-operating with the arm 54. Ratchet wheel 69 also carries on the side opposite to pin 77 and disc 78 a spring housing 82 containing a spiral spring 83 which tends to rotate said wheel against the direction of the arrow in Figure 5 to the starting position. A leaf spring 84 is provided with a preferably insulated nipple 85 co-operating with a recess 8S inthe arm 54.

The parts are electrically interconnected in the manner shown in Figure 8. From one pole of the current source a circuit may be traced through a series resistance 88, the spring contacts 59, 60, the coin 87, the spring contacts 57, 58, the winding of the horeshoe magnet 70, the contacts 71, 72, the clapper 65, the line 89, and the resistance 90 to the opposite pole of the current source. If desired, a switch 91 can be adapted to disconnect the resistance 90 so that the current may pass instead through a signal device or the like interconnected between the terminals 92, 93.

The device functions in the following manner.

If and when a spurious coin 87 has been tested and detected and enters the chute 21, it is stopped by the abutment 52. In this position a circuit is closed through the coin as shown in Figure 8 and the electromagnets 70 are energized and attract the clapper 65. Movement of the clapper against the bell then opens the contacts 71, 72 so that the electromagnet 70 is again de-energized whereupon the clapper 65 is swung back under the action of the spring 84 and the contacts 71, 72 are again closed. The clapper 65 is thus given a reciprocating movement so that the bell 63 gives a ringing signal. At the same time the pawl 68 is given a reciprocating motion with the result that the ratchet wheel 69 and its pin 81 are advanced stepby-step in the direction of the arrow in Figure 5.

When the pin 81 reaches and actuates the arm 54 the abutment 52 is moved outwardly from beneath the coin 87, carrying with it a cross rod 94.

The rod 94 raises the spring contacts 59 and 60 which in turn, through the intermedium of an insulating rod 95 fixed to the contacts 57, 58, raise the latter out of engagement with the coin 87. At the same time the nipple 85 drops into the recess 86 so that the arm 53 is held in this position for a short moment. The coin may then drop down freely and continue its passage through chute 21 to its ultimate destination. As soon as the arm 53 has taken up its swung-out position the link 75 holds the ratchet 73 out of engagement with the ratchet teeth of the wheel 69. Then when the pawl 68 slides out of engagement with the teeth at the next oscillation of the clapper 65 the wheel 69 will be released and rotate under the action of the spring 83 against the direction of the arrow back to its normal at rest or starting position As the ratchet wheel approaches its starting position the pin 77 will actuate the arm 54 so as to return it to the position shown in Figure 5, in which position the abutment 52 is in the path of and ready to retain the next coin entering the chute, and the springs 57, 58 and 59, 60 are in position to contact therewith. At the same time the ratchet 73 again takes up an operative position in relation to the ratchet wheel 69 and the device is ready to give a signal if and when the next spurious coin is inserted in the apparatus. If desired, the alarm device may be disposed at a distance from the testing apparatus, as in a watchroom or in the localities of the police force or the like. It may also be adapted to actuate a lamp or other visual or acoustic signal. It is to be understood that the embodiment of the invention disclosed herein is for purposes of illustration only and is not to be construed as defining the limits of the invention. For example, various changes, substitutions and modifications which will now become apparent to those skilled in the art may be made in the form, details of construction and arrangement of the parts without departing from the spirit of the invention. Reference is therefore to be had to the appended claims for a definition of the limits of the invention.

What is claimed is:1. In a coin testing device for distinguishing between and separately disposing of genuine coins and spurious coins made of a metal softer than that of the genuine coins, means for holding the coins to be tested in testing position, a testing member having mounted thereon a plurality of elements having sharpened portions adapted to engage the coins, means for moving said testing member toward and away from the coin testing position so as to bring said sharpened elements into contact with the coins, yieldable means for limiting the pressure exerted by said elements against the coins to an amount insufficient to effect penetration thereby of a genuine coin, said pressure being such and the sharpened portions of said elements having such angles and surfaces of engagement with the coins that upon contact with a spurious coin of soft metal said sharpened portions are forced into the coin in such manner that the latter becomes adherent thereto, a strike-off member interposed between the testing member and the coin testing position and having openings therein through which the sharpened portions of said elements may extend for engagement with the coins, said strike-off member being movable with said testing member toward and away from the testing position, and means for limiting the extent of movement of said strike-off member away from the testing position to an amount less than that of said testing member whereby continued movement of the latter after said strike-off member has reached the limit of its movement releases the adherence between said sharpened elements and any spurious coin that may be engaged thereby.

2. In a coin testing device for distinguishing between and separately disposing of genuine coins and spurious coins made of a metal softer than that of the genuine coins, means for holding the coins to be tested in testing position, a testing member having mounted thereon a plurality of elements having sharpened portions adapted to engage the coins, means for moving said testing member toward and away from the coin testing position so as to bring said sharpened elements into contact with the coins, yieldable means for limiting the pressure exerted by said elements against the coins to an amount insufficient to effect penetration thereby of a genuine coin, said pressure being such and the sharpened portions of said elements having such angles and surfaces of engagement with the coins that upon contact with a spurious coin of soft metal said sharpened portions are forced into the coin in such manner that the latter becomes adherent thereto, a strike-off member interposed between the testing member and the coin testing position and having openings therein through which the sharpened portions of said elements may extend for engagement with the coins, means providing a frictional connection between said strikeoff member and said testing member whereby said members normally move together toward and away from the .testing position but are capable of relative movement with respect to one another, and means for limiting the extent of movement of said strike-off member away from the testing position to an amount less than that of said testing member whereby continued movement of the latter after said strike-off member has reached the limit of its movement releases the adherence between said sharpened elements and any spurious coin that may be engaged thereby.

3. In a coin testing device for distinguishing between and separately disposing of genuine coins and spurious coins made of a metal softer than that of the genuine coins, a coin chute for the coins to be tested having opposite walls parallel to the flat faces of the coins, means for temporarily holding coins in testing position at a point within said chute, a testing member having mounted thereon a plurality of elements having sharpened portions adapted to engage the coins, means for moving said testing member toward and away from the coin testing position in a direction perpendicular to the walls of said chute so as to bring said sharpened elements into contact with the coins, one of the walls of said chute having an opening therein adjacent the coin testing position through which said sharpened elements are moved, the opposite wall having an outwardly movable section of greater area than that of the coins to be tested, and spring means for yieldingly resisting movement of said movable section, the pressure exerted by said spring means being so adjusted as to limit the pressure exerted by said elements against the coins to an amount insufficient to effect penetration thereby of a genuine coin, said pressure being such and the sharpened portions of said elements having such angles and surfaces of engagement with the coins that upon contact with a spurious coin of soft metal said sharpened portions are forced into the coin in such manner that the latter becomes and remains adherent thereto until forcibly removed therefrom.

HJALMAR LEONARD PETTERSSON.