Title:
Deformable insole
United States Patent 2092909


Abstract:
-This invention relates to improvements in foot supports, particularly foot supports which are built into shoes as manufactured, and to the methods by which replaceable foot supports are formed to fit the shoes and feet of the wearer, or the foot supports which are built into the shoes as manufactured...



Inventors:
Daniels, Claude H.
Application Number:
US4404035A
Publication Date:
09/14/1937
Filing Date:
10/08/1935
Assignee:
Daniels, Claude H.
Primary Class:
Other Classes:
12/142N, 12/146M, 12/148, 36/30R, 264/223, 264/267, 264/DIG.30
International Classes:
A43B7/28
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Description:

-This invention relates to improvements in foot supports, particularly foot supports which are built into shoes as manufactured, and to the methods by which replaceable foot supports are formed to fit the shoes and feet of the wearer, or the foot supports which are built into the shoes as manufactured are formed to fit the feet of the wearer.

It is well understood that the feet of different persons have individual characteristics, and it is almost impossible to obtain a correct fit when the shoes are manufactured from standard designs of lasts. Even though the size of the shoe may be correct for the foot to which it is fitted, the insole does not fit the sole of the foot and form the proper support for the arch. Replaceable supports for the feet, such as heel cushions and metatarsal supports, etc., are not manufactured in a sufficient number of shapes and sizes so that a support may be selected to fit the individual foot. Furthermore, it is a difficult proposition to properly position such arch supports in the shoes.

According to my invention, foot supports are manufactured which, when completed, will permanently retain the shape of the particular foot and shoe with which such support is to be associated, or if built into the shoes to form a part of the shoe, will permanently retain the shape of the foot which is to wear the shoe.

In my invention foot supports are formed which ,are initially plastic and moldable at normal temperature so that such a foot support can be placed in a shoe and the foot inserted into the shoe so that pressure applied to the foot causes the foot support to take the shape of the foot and, according to my invention, the shape of the foot support produced by the pressure of the foot may be permanently retained by causing the plastic material of the foot support to be transformed to a non-plastic form retaining state.

Thus, according to my invention, the foot supports may be individually manufactured or initially built into the shoes, and comprise a material which is initially plastic and moldable at normal temperature retained within a flexible envelope or covering. The plastic material may be of a composition which will harden upon contact with the air, or which may be hardened by the application of heat, or which may be hardened by first wetting the material and subsequently drying it. Plastics of the first type may comprise a composition known as "plastic wood" or a rubber composition that is soft and moldable. In all cases the foot support is molded by the presa sure of the foot to the desired shape and then, when and if desired, either by admitting air into the support or by applying heat, or by drying a previously moistened foot support, the material will be transformed to a non-plastic or rigid inflexible mass which will retain the shape to which it has been molded and may thereafter be used as a proper and correct arch support for the individual foot.

In the drawing:Fig. 1 is a plan view of a foot support, a portion of which is broken away to show the interior thereof; Fig. 2 is a sectional elevation of a shoe having a foot support incorporated therein; Fig. 3 is a cross section of the foot support shown in Mg. 1; Fig. 1 illustrates one form of a foot support which can be manufactured for insertion into a finished shoe. The envelope or flexible walled chamber 10 may be made from fabric, thin leather or other material. The top and bottom layers II and 12 of the material may be stitched as at 13 to leave a filling opening at one end. It is preferable to make the material of the envelope airtight and this may be done by applying an adhe- 25sive sealing compound 14 of cement, liquid latex or a similar substance. If desired, the sealing compound may be readily sprayed on the exterior of the stitched envelope and then the envelope may be turned inside out to bring the sealed surface to the inner side.

The envelope is filled with material 16 which is plastic and moldable at normal temperature. The envelope after being filled is sealed at the filling opening by cement or latex 18. It is particularly desired that the material used *for the filling in the foot support be moldable at normal temperature so that the support may be placed in a shoe and the shoe applied to a foot.

It would be objectionable to have the foot rest upon a heated body. The pressure of the foot causes the foot support to take the shape of the foot and in such operation there is a tendency to raise the arch of the foot and to cause the bones of the foot to return to their normal positions. After the foot support has been molded to fit the individual foot and shoe with which it has been associated, it may be transformed from a plastic body to a non-plastic body so as to permanently retain the desired shape. Foot supports of this form may be built into the shoes as they are manufactured and may extend the full length of the shoe, as illustrated in Pig. 2. In this figure the shoe 20 has a layer of flexible material 22 which is stitched or otherwise secured to an underneath layer 24 to form a chamber which receives the filler 16. The bottom layer 24 need not be as flexible as the upper lsyer 22, and the insole of the shoe may form the layer 24.

For the filling material it is preferable to use a composition that hardens upon contact with air such as a material known as "plastic wood" and described in Griffiths Patent No. 1,838,618 issued December 29, 1931, although I desire to use cork flour instead of wood flour in the composition to obtain a light weight composition. The essential ingredients of the mpotoe composition are a solution of nitro cellulose, such as celluloid, in a volatile liquid such as benzol, and a filler of finely divided cork which will form a putty-like plastic mass which hardens upon exposure to the air. Nondrying oils and resinous materials may also be included in the composition, as fully described in the Griffiths patent.

When an air hardening composition is used it may be found desirable to exhaust the residual air so far as possible from the envelope after it has been filled so that the material will remain plastic and moldable for a long period of time.

This may be done by the use of a hypodermic needle which may be inserted through the material 18 used for the seal at the filling opening.

The air may be pumped out by the hypodermic : " needle. By using a fine hollow needle only a small opening is made through the sealing compound which will close as the needle is withdrawn.

When it is desired to cause hardening of the "plastic cork" composition, the envelope is punctured or perforated or an opening is made in some manner to admit air. The rate of hardening is dependent upon the degree to which the air is permitted to enter the envelope to evaporate the solvent, and is therefore controllable by the user.

-40 The period of hardening may be prolonged by making only small holes in the envelope which retains the plastic body.

It is within the scope of my invention to use other materials as the filler which are cold moldable and transformable to a non-plastic state.

For example, cold molding resins may be used which are transformed by heat to a solid infusible body. A material like plaster of Paris could be used which is moldable when wet and is hardened by drying. It is also within the scope of my invention to use rubber in a moldable putty-like state such as latex which is still moldable due tc the presence of water or crude rubber which haw been rendered soft by a solvent. The rubber wil harden as the water or solvent is removed upor contact with the air. The drying or hardening may be more rapidly accomplished by blowing heated air into the shoe.

It will be understood that the plastic mate rial will remain in a plastic moldable state s, long as it is retained in the air-tight envelope ani the foot support.may be used in the muldabl form. It is preferable, however, after the foe impression has been obtained, to cause a trans 05 formation of the mass to a non-plastic form re taining state. When the rubber composition i used the foot support will be yieldable but wi elastically return to the shape in which it h£ been molded. In the other forms of the compos: tion the foot support will be inflexible and cor stitute a rigid body.

I claim: 1. A unitary article for receiving an impressic from a foot and for permanently retaining su( impression, comprising a receiver having flexit walls, said walls being sealed against the passage of air, a mass of plastic material in said receiver which is adapted to harden upon access to air, said walls being perforable to admit air for such hardening when desired. 2. Aifoot support comprising a plastic moldable mass which is transformable in the presence of air to a non-plastic form retaining shape and an air-tight sealed envelope of flexible material enclosing said mass for retaining said mass in its plastic state.

3. 'he method of forming a foot support which consists in formin g an air-tight envelope of flexible material, filling said envelope with a plastic, moldable mass which is transformable in the presence of air to a non-plastic form retaining shape, sealing said envelope after it has been filled to retain said mass in a plastic moldable state, and placing said envelope in a shoe whereby pressure applied by the foot thereto will mold the envelope to the shape of the foot.

4. The method of taking the impression of a foot which consists in filling a flexible walled chamber with a plastic mass capable of hardening upon access to the air, sealing said chamber, perforating a wall of said chamber immediately prior to taking a foot impression, and allowing the material to harden after the foot impression has been taken.

5. The method of forming a foot support adapted to be used in a shoe, which consists in forming an envelope of flexible material, filling said envelope with a plastic mass which hardens upon access to the air, placing said envelope in a shoe, inserting the foot into the shoe and apply- 5 ing pressure to the foot, whereby the plastic mass is caused to take the shape of the foot, and making an opening into the envelope to admit air when it is desired to cause hardening of the plastic mass to retain a foot impression. 6. The method of forming a foot, support adapted to receive and retain the impression of a foot, which consists in forming a flexible walled envelope, filling said envelope with a plastic mass capable of hardening upon access to air, abstracting the residual air from said envelope after it has been filled, sealing said envelope after the air has been removed and perforating the envelope when it is desired that the plastic mass shall harden to retain a foot impression.. 7. The method of forming a foot support which consists in forming a flexible walled envelope s having a filling opening, sealing the exterior of I said envelope with an adhesive solution, reversing i said envelope to bring the sealed surface to the g inner side, filling said envelope with a plastic g mass capable of hardening upon access to the air, removing the residual air from said envelope so that said material will remain plastic for a long D period of time, and subsequently perforating a d wall of said envelope when it is desired to cause e hardening of said material.

it 8. The method of making a foot- support - adapted to receive and retain a foot impression which consists in forming a plastic mass capable is of hardening upon contact with another element, 11 sealing said mass within an envelope, making a is foot impression thereon and making an opening i- into said envelope when it is desired to admit i- the element which will cause hardening of the mass to retain the foot impression.

9. The method of forming a foot support >n which consists in forming an envelope of flexible ,h material, sealing the walls of said envelope, fill6le ing the envelope with a plastic mass capable of hardening in contact with the air, and abstracting the residual air from the envelope to retain the plastic state of the filler for a long period of time.

10. A foot support adapted to receive and retain a foot impression comprising a filler sealed within and retained in a plastic state by a flexible impervious envelope through which an opening may be readily made to admit an element which will cause hardening of the filler.

11. A foot support adapted to receive and retain a foot impression comprising a filler hermetically sealed within and retained in a plastic state by a flexible impervious envelope through which an opening may be readily made to admit air which will cause hardening of the filler.

12. A foot support comprising a fabric envelope, a filling compound which is moldable at normal temperature under the pressure of a foot retained within the envelope and a sealing coating on the envelope which prevents hardening of the filling compound for some time.

13. A foot support comprising a fabric envelope, a filling compound which is moldable at normal temperature retained within the envelope and a sealing coating of rubber applied to the envelope which prevents hardening of the filling compound for a long period of time.

CLAUDE H. DANIELS. 15