Title:
Drum major baton
United States Patent 2092354


Abstract:
This invention relates to a baton mainly de signed for drum majors, the general object of thi invention being to provide a baton which can be manufactured to sell at low cost and which car be easily manipulated and one which will withstand hard usage. This invention also consists in certain...



Inventors:
Morris, Leonard
Application Number:
US14223937A
Publication Date:
09/07/1937
Filing Date:
05/12/1937
Assignee:
Morris, Leonard
Primary Class:
Other Classes:
984/258
International Classes:
G10G7/00
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Description:

This invention relates to a baton mainly de signed for drum majors, the general object of thi invention being to provide a baton which can be manufactured to sell at low cost and which car be easily manipulated and one which will withstand hard usage.

This invention also consists in certain othe features of construction and in the combination and arrangement of several parts, to be hereinafter fully described, illustrated in the accompanying drawing and specifically pointed out in the appended claims.

In describing the invention in detail, reference will be had to the accompanying drawing wherein like characters denote like or corresponding parts throughout the several views, and in which:Figure 1 is a view of the complete device.

Figure 2 is a longitudinal sectional view of the device.

Figure 3 is a section on the line 3-3 of FigFigure 4 is a view of the device without the rubber tip and ball thereon.

25 In these views the numeral I indicates a shaft of suitable wood which has its ends bored to receive the lead 2. This lead may be melted and poured in the hole and then hammered so as to cause it to remain in place. There should be more lead used at the upper end of the device than at the lower end so that the baton will balance approximately one to two inches off center toward the ball at theupper end of the device.

A metal tube 3 preferably of brass fits over the major portion of the shaft I but the upper end of the shaft projects from the tube as shown in Figures 2 and 4. A screw 4 passes through the lower end of the tube into the shaft and the lead as shown in Figure 2. A rubber tip 5, similar to that used on crutches is placed on the lower end of the device and is held in place by cement or glue. I prefer to roughen the lower end of the tube so that the tip will stick more firmly thereto.

usInstead of using a screw a brass rivet may be The upper end of the shaft ed. which projects The upper end of the shaft I which projects above the tube being wrapped with wire as shown e at 6 and taped as shown at 7 after which a ball e 8 is slipped over this projecting end of the shaft, a washer 9 of rubber being placed between the ball and the upper end of the tube as shown in Figure 2. The ball is preferably sponge rubber though it may be made of hard rubber and has an opening therein to receive the projecting end of the shaft, cement or glue being used to hold the ball to the shaft. The device may be finished in any suitable manner. For instance it may be chromium plated or the brass can be polished and the parts can be colored as desired.

The rubber parts at the ends of the device not only protect the baton when dropped but they also prevent damage to furniture and woodwork during indoor practice. The weighted ends and light center facilitate twirling of the baton and the use of the wood shaft makes the device light and inexpensive while the metal tube makes twirling easier than if wood were used throughout.

It is thought from the foregoing description that the advantages and novel features of the invention will be readily apparent.

It is to be understood that changes may be made in the construction and in the combination and arrangement of the several parts, provided that such changes fall within the scope of the appended claims.

What is claimed is:1. A baton of the class described comprising a shaft of wood having its ends weighted, a resilient tip at one end of the baton, a resilient ball at the other end and a metal sleeve fitting over the wood where the same is exposed.

2. A baton of the class described comprising a wood shaft having weights in its ends, a metal sleeve enclosing the shaft and extending from one end to a point an appreciable distance from the other end, a rubber ball fitting over the expanded end of the shaft, a washer between the ball and the sleeve and encircling a portion of the shaft, and a rubber tip fitting over the other end of the baton.

MORRIS LEONARD.