Title:
Golf glove
United States Patent 2083604


Abstract:
This invention relates to golf gloves. An object of the invention is to provide a glove which may be worn during regular play or in practice for the specific purpose of overcoming the tendency of the average golfer to incorrectly grip the clubs throughout the swing. It seems to be universally...



Inventors:
Peter, Hay
Application Number:
US9145936A
Publication Date:
06/15/1937
Filing Date:
07/20/1936
Assignee:
Peter, Hay
Primary Class:
Other Classes:
2/20, 2/161.2, 473/205, D29/116.2
International Classes:
A63B71/14; A63B23/12
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Description:

This invention relates to golf gloves.

An object of the invention is to provide a glove which may be worn during regular play or in practice for the specific purpose of overcoming the tendency of the average golfer to incorrectly grip the clubs throughout the swing.

It seems to be universally recognized at this time that in the game of golf it is the left hand which should control the swing and guide the club head throughout the hitting motion. Many theories are advanced for this conclusion, but it is believed that experience indicates that inasmuch as the swing is from left to right (in the case of a right hand player) it is because the left side of the player is foremost in the conclusion of the swing that the left hand is the logical member to produce both control and power.

To carry this theory into practical and satisfactory effect necessitates a proper gripping of the club with the left hand during all parts of the swing, that is in the addressing of the ball, the backswing, and the downswing. Certain it is that when the left hand is properly positioned on the club grip and the grip is firm, from the beginning to the end of the swing, the possibility of hooking or slicing or other error in making the shot is reduced to a negligible minimum.

It is a common fault, however, among all classes of golfers to improperly grip the club with the left hand at varying stages of the swing with disastrous results.

For example, many players properly grasp the club at the moment of addressing the ball, but lose the grip by relaxing the third and fourth fingers as the backswing progresses. As the downswing commences their desire to obtain maximum distance with the shot is telegraphed to the hands and there is a tendency to grip the club handle too tightly. When this is done the muscles on the left side of the body, including the hand and arm, are "frozen" to the extent that all semblance of desirable control and power are lost.

Under these circumstances some means of insuring a firm grip on the club throughout the swing is necessary and desirable. In many instances the use of such a device may be temporary only for proper training as to gripping. In other instances players may find its use an adfentageous permanent supplement to the playing equip#nent.

It is therefore an object of the present invention to provide a glove so constructed as to teach the correct use of the third and fourth fingers of 6s the left hand in gripping the clubs for the better results to follow and at the same time provide an article which is both convenient and comfortable in use.

Other objects will become apparent as the specification proceeds. Reference is now had to the accompanying drawing in which Figure 1 is a perspective view of the glove in use.

Figure 2 is a plan view of the back of the glove.

Figure 3 is a plan view of the palm side of the glove.

Figure 4 is a plan view of the back of a glove embodying a modification of the invention. The numeral 10 indicates a glove of basically conventional construction, to which the present invention has been added.

A reinforcing strap II, having a buckle 12, is stitched to the wrist portion of the glove so that the connection thereof takes place on the outside of the wearer's wrist. The use of this reinforcement is to overcome the strain put on the glove during its use and makes it possible to secure the same to the player's hand. A stub strap i3, integral with the strap II, projects therefrom at substantially a 45* angle, from a point adjacent the thumb on the palm side, toward the fourth finger, and carries a buckle 14.

A strap 15, substantially as wide as two of the glove fingers is secured to the back of the glove to overlay the fingers or stalls 16 and 1 by stitching or other suitable means as at 18. As illustrated in Figure 2 of the drawing the loose end of the strap IS is reduced as at IS for engagement with the buckle 14.

As clearly illustrated in Figure 1, in use the end 19 of strap 15 is drawn into engagement with buckle 14, thus substantially closing the third and fourth fingers of the wearer. Care should be exercised not to draw strap 15 too tightly about the third and fourth fingers since this would tend to tighten the muscles of the player too much and at the same time it would limit the freedom with which the club grips may be inserted and withdrawn from the loop thus formed. It will be appreciated that it is purely optional whether the, player unloosens strap IS when selecting clubs for each shot or simply adjusts the same at the beginning of the play and slides the club handle under the fingers and controlling strap. Since substantially all club grips are of uniform size it is probable that the average user would prefer to adjust the strap 15 once for the use of all clubs during subsequent shots, occasionally removing glove 10 for relaxation.

The modification illustrated in Figure 4 comprises the substitution of a mitten 20 for the third and fourth fingers 16 and I7, respectively illustrated in Figures 1 to 3, inclusive, as a means of securing the fingers accommodated therein against relative movement. In this form a strap 21 is stiched or otherwise secured adjacent the tip of the mitten 20 for engagement with buckle 14.

Experiments have proved that the subject matter of the present invention is quite useful for the purpose designed whether it be a means for teaching the correct thing to be done in play or as a device for constant use in actual play.

These experiments have indicated that the glove overcomes any tendency to loosen the grip at the critical stages of the swing and thereby promotes control and accuracy in the making of the various shots.

It is to be appreciated that the invention may take many forms in addition to those illustrated in the drawing and therefore I do not wish to be understood as limiting myself to the preferred form only. For example, it would seem entirely feasible to manufacture a glove incorporating the improvements of this invention by cutting strap 18 and its reduced portion 19 as an integral part of the back of the glove 10 and secure the inner halves of fingers 16 and 17 thereto by the usual stitching.

Similarly other means may be found in lieu of a buckle and strap arrangement to secure the third and fourth fingers of the hand against opening. For instance, it may be feasible to stitch the tops of the glove fingers for the third and fourth fingers of the hand to the palm of glove so that the same would be in a substantially closed position at all times or an extension piece may be provided for fingers 16 and 17 to be stitched to the wrist portion of the glove. Also it may be that good manufacturing practice would dictate the use of a snap fastener or other fastening means for buckle 14.

It is also quite obvious that gloves embodying the principle of this invention may find many uses in addition to the game of golf. For example, the principle may be useful in other sports such as tennis, badminton, and even in certain industries.

Therefore, it is to be understood that in illustrating but two forms I do not wish to limit myself to these forms only but rather desire protection according to the scope of the appended claims.

I claim: 1. A golf glove having means for securing the third and fourth fingers thereof in a substantially fist like closed position regardless of the position of the other fingers of said glove.

2. In a golf glove, a buckle disposed adjacent the wrist section on the palm side thereof, a strap secured to the back of the third and fourth fingers thereof, said strap having a reduced portion for engagement with said buckle.

3. In a golf glove, fastening means disposed adjacent the wrist section on the palm side thereof, and a flexible member secured to the third and fourth fingers of the glove which when engaged by said fastening means will retain said fingers in a substantially closed fist-like position. 4. In a golf glove, fastening means disposed at the inside wrist section thereof, flexible means secured to the stalls for the third and fourth fingers which when engaged by said fastening means will retain the said fingers of the glove in a substantially fist like closed position.

5. In a golf glove, means for securing the third and fourth fingers of the wearer against relative movement, and means cooperating with said first-named means for securing said fingers in a substantially fist like closed position.

6. In a golf glove, a strap attached to the back of the third and fourth fingers of the glove, and a buckle for said strap disposed adjacent the wrist portion of the glove. 7. In a golf glove, retainer means securing the third and fourth fingers against relative movement, and a buckle for said retainer means disposed adjacent the wrist portion of the glove.

8. In a golf glove, a strap attached to the third and fourth fingers to secure them against relative movement, and a fastener for said strap disposed on the inside wrist portion of the glove nearest the thumb.

9. In a golf glove, a strap attached to the third and fourth fingers to secure them against relative movement, a buckle for said strap disposed on the wrist portion of the glove nearest the thumb, and a reinforcing strap disposed about 5g the wrist portion.

PETER HAY.