Title:
Tone bar
United States Patent 2073331


Abstract:
This invention relates to an improvement in a tone bar which is commonly employed in playing a guitar or other stringed instrument in which the strings are positioned at a considerable distance above the frets. It has long been the custom when playing instruments of this kind to use a metal...



Inventors:
Allen, James S.
Application Number:
US2812335A
Publication Date:
03/09/1937
Filing Date:
06/24/1935
Assignee:
Allen, James S.
Primary Class:
Other Classes:
984/110
International Classes:
G10D3/00
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Description:

This invention relates to an improvement in a tone bar which is commonly employed in playing a guitar or other stringed instrument in which the strings are positioned at a considerable distance above the frets.

It has long been the custom when playing instruments of this kind to use a metal bar, commonly known as a steel, for depressing the strings. Iowever, considerable dissatisfaction has always been expressed where the metal bar is used because of the resultant distinctly unmusical, metallic tone.

Many unsuccessful attempts were made to overcome this difficulty. A steel having a soft metal contacting surface, also hardwood straight edges, have been used but because they did not entirely overcome the rasping metallic sound, or because the strings quickly cut grooves into the surface thereof, they have not received popular reception.

An additional source of dissatisfaction in the former steel resided in the fact that when the operator's fingers became damp the steel would become slippery and consequently, very difficult to hold. Dampness also seriously impaired the hardwood straight edges.

One of the chief objects of the musical accessory of this invention resides in the provision of means for eliminating the raucous metallic sound usually produced by the former method of depressing the strings.

Another and further important object of the invention is the provision of means for con35 structing the accessory in cylindrical form.

Still apother and further important object of advantage resides in providing the accessory with a gripping surface which is not affected by dampness.

The invention possesses other objects and features of importance and advantage, some of which, with the foregoing, will be set forth in the following description.

The invention, in a preferred form, is illustrated in the annexed drawing and hereinafter more fully described.

In the drawing: Figure 1 is an elevation of preferred embodiment of the tone bar of this invention.

Figure 2 is a vertical section thereof.

Figure 3 is an end view of the tone bar shown in Figure 1.

Figure 4 is an elevation showing a slight modiflcation in the construction of the tone bar. o Figure 5 is a sectional view of the modified tone bar shown in Figure 4.

Figure 6 is an end view of the modified tone bar shown in Figures 4 and 5.

Figure 7 is a sectional view of a still further , modification.

Figure 8 is also a sectional view of a slight modification of the preferred embodiment.

Figure 9 is an end view of the tone bar shown in Figure 7.

Figure 10 is an end view of the tone bar shown :10 in Figure 8.

Figure 11 is a sectional view showing another slight modification of the preferred construction. The reference numeral 10 indicates in a general way the body of the tone bar which is preferably constructed of a non-corrosive, non-rusting, relatively heavy metal, such as stainless steel, Monel metal, or any other suitable metal. The body 10 is preferably made up from rod stock and may be formed of a single piece of metal or in more than one piece, as is clearly shown in Figure 5.

In the preferred embodiment of the tone bar as shown in Figures 1, 2 and 3, threaded holes 12 are formed in the ends of the body 10, as is best shown in Figure 2. The holes 12 may be used in cooperation with screws for positioning a handle on the accessory. Positioned on the body 10 and entirely surrounding it is a fiber sleeve 14. The ends of the body 10 may protrude beyond the sleeve 14, as is best shown in Figures 4 and 5, or the sleeve 14 may extend beyond the ends of the body 10, as is best shown in Figures 8 and 11.

In the construction of the preferred embodiment as shown in Figures 1, 2 and 3, and also in tte modifications, the body 10 is forced, under pressure, into the sleeve 14 where it is secured by friction.

In the modification shown in Figure 7, the ends of the body 10 are indented 16 to provide a finger rest for the operator. Additionally, the indentations 16 provide a means for securely holding the tone bar as it is rolled up and down the strings of a musical instrument.

Closures 18, as best shown in Figures 8 and 11, may be inserted in the ends of the sleeve 14 to provide a non-slipping end for the operator's inger to rest against.

It will be apparent from the foregoing that the netal body is used chiefly to increase the weight )f the tone bar, yet is used in such a manner that the metal does not contact the strings of a musical instrument when the tone bar is used thereon.

Moreover, because any portion of the fiber sleeve may be used as a working surface, and because of the fact that friction is greatly reduced as compared to metal working surfaces, the accessory is exceptionally long lived.

Furthermore, because of the cylindrical form of the tone bar and the fact that it may be rolled, even the slight sound created by sliding the fiber over wound strings may be eliminated.

I am aware that many changes may be made and numerous details of construction varied throughout a wide range without departing from the principles of this invention and I, therefore, do not purpose limiting the patent granted hereon otherwise than as necessitated by the prior art.

I claim as my invention: 1. In a tone bar, a metal bar, said bar being circular in cross section, and a cylindrical fiber sleeve secured to and covering the entire peripheral surface of said metal bar.

2. In a tone bar, a fiber cylinder, a metal core positioned within said cylinder, said core being circular in cross section, the ends of said cylinder extending beyond the ends of said metal core, and a closure secured within each outwardly extending cylinder end.

3. In a tone bar, a hollow fiber member cylindrical in formation and having a closed end and an open end, a metal member conforming in shape to the interior of said fiber member positioned therein, and a closure member secured within the open end of said cylindrically shaped fiber member.

4. A tone bar for stringed instruments comprising, a metallic body, said body being circular in cross section, and a non-metallic cylindrical ,10 sleeve-like member secured to and covering the outer surface of said metallic body.

5. A tone bar for stringed instruments comprising, a metallic body, said body being circular in cross section, a non-metallic cylindrical sleevelike member secured to the outer surface of said metallic body, said cylindrical sleeve-like member being of sufficient length to cover approximately the entire circumferential surface of said metallic body. 6. A tone bar for stringed instruments comprising, a metallic body, said body being circular in cross section, a non-metallic cylindrical sleevelike member secured to the outer surface of said metallic body, and a concave depression formed in each end of said metallic body.

JAMES S. ALLEN.