Title:
Relay
United States Patent 2057380


Abstract:
This invention relates to improvements in relays and has for an object the provision of a double coil relay in which the core forms an armature adapted to reciprocate in one direction when one coil is energized and in an opposite direction when the other coil is energized. Another object of...



Inventors:
Keefe, Lincoln M.
Application Number:
US70079233A
Publication Date:
10/13/1936
Filing Date:
12/04/1933
Assignee:
Keefe, Lincoln M.
Primary Class:
Other Classes:
200/16B, 200/16R, 200/DIG.29, 335/54, 335/171, 335/187, 335/253, 335/255
International Classes:
H01H51/12; H01H3/62
View Patent Images:



Description:

This invention relates to improvements in relays and has for an object the provision of a double coil relay in which the core forms an armature adapted to reciprocate in one direction when one coil is energized and in an opposite direction when the other coil is energized.

Another object of the invention is the provision, in a double coil relay, of stationary contacts at either end of the coil structure in line with the reciprocating armature, and contacts positioned on each end of said armature in such a manner that one of the armature contacts engages one of the stationary contacts when the armature moves in one direction due to the energization of one of, the coils, and the other armature contact engages the other stationary contact when the armature is influenced by the other coil.

A further object of the invention is the provision of means including spring means engaging the armature and adapted to hold it under tension in either of its two positions with one of its contacts engaging one of the stationary contacts thereby ensuring a minimum contact resistance.

Still another object is the provision, in a double acting relay having a sliding core armature, of an armature having restrained spring loaded contacts in addition to the spring load provided for effecting a "toggle" action of the armature.

Another object is the provision of a double coil relay having a moving core armature adapted to reciprocate within the compass of the coils and having contacts external to the coil.

A further object of the invention is the provision of a relay having a moving core armature adapted to reciprocate within the center of the winding, and having a mercury tube adapted to be rocked by the movement of the armature.

Still a further object of the invention is the provision of a relay having a moving core armature adapted to close a pair of contacts at each end of its stroke and having auxiliary contacts adapted to be actuated at a point between the limits of the movement of the armature.

Other objects and advantages of the invention will become apparent to those skilled in the art, particularly the method of sealing the armature and the contacts away from the air, and the compact manner of mounting a plurality of these 50 relays in groups, which will be presently described.

Referring to the drawings: Figure 1 is a sectional elevation of the new and improved relay showing the relative positions of the windings, the contacts and the reciprocating core armature; Figure 2 is a sectional elevation of, a modified form of the relay shown in Figure 1; Figure 3 is an end view of the relay shown in Figure 2, showing the arrangement of the terminals; Figure 4 is a sectional elevation of a further modification of the improved relay in which the contacts are positioned outside of the zone of the windings; Figure 5 is an elevation of a portion of. the contacts as viewed along the line 5-5 of Fig. 4; Figure 6 is a plan view of the contacts and the contact strip of Figure 4; Figure 7 is a sectional elevation of another modification of the improved relay in which the armature is provided with restrained, spring loaded contactors; Figure 8 is an elevation of an embodiment of the invention similar to Figure 4, but with the provision of a rocking mercury switch adapted to be actuated by the reciprocating armature; Figure 9 is an elevation of a relay such as is shown in Figure 1, with the provision of auxiliary contact members adapted to be actuated between the two extreme positions of the armature; Figure 10 is a side view, partly in section, showing the method of mounting the improved relays in compact groups; Figure 11 is a fragmentary end view of a plurality of the devices shown in Figure 10 showing how conveniently they may be connected up; and Figure 12 is a diagrammatic sketch showing the relay connected up to control a plurality of circuits.

Referring again to Figure 1, a sleeve 20, preferably of a material having a different consistency and hardness from that of the armature 21, is provided and forms a support for the windings 22 and 23. It has been found that brass or bronze serves very nicely as a material from which to form the sleeve 20. The interior bore of this sleeve is reamed or otherwise highly finished to form an easy working fit with the armature 21.

It has been found desirable to cut a longitudinal slot in the sleeve or tube 20 to reduce eddy currents and the choking effect of a closed conductor around the core of the windings which in this case is the moving armature 21.

The moving armature designated by the numeral 21 has one end 24, and the other end 25 of full diameter to form a working fit with the interior of the sleeve 20. The mid-portion of the armature is machined in the form of two conical frustrums 26, 27 with their bases common along the midline 28 of the armature, the midline 28 being of substantially the same diameter as that of the ends 24 and 25.

A center head 29 is carried by the sleeve 20 and is preferably positioned midway between the ends thereof.

A plurality of radial holes 30 and 31 are formed in the center head 29 extending through and communicating with the interior bore of the sleeve 20.

The actuating coil 22 is wound on the sleeve 20 on one side of the center head 29 and the reset coil 23 is wound on the sleeve on the other side of the center head.

The armature 21 carries a contact point 36 on its end 24, and a contact point 37 on its end 25, substantially on the center line thereof.

With the armature 21 positioned within the bore of the sleeve 20, and the windings 22 and 23 in place thereon, the balls 32 and 33 are placed in the holes 30 and 31 after which the springs 34 and 35 are placed in the holes and an outer sleeve 38, the interior of which forms a working fit with the center head 29 retains the springs 34 and 35 in position with the balls 32 and 33 engaging the armature. The sleeve 38 is preferably made of iron or steel of high permeability as it encloses all the parts of the relay and forms a return path for the magnetic flux.

End heads 39 and 40 are provided and fitted into and flush with the ends of the outer sleeve 38 where they also form part of the path for the magnetic flux. These end heads 40 have bosses 41 and 42 respectively formed integral therewith 36 extending into and forming a fit with the interior bore of the sleeve 20.

The boss 41 and the end head 39 is bored out and provided with an insulating bushing 43 which carries a contact member 44 having a head formed thereon to cooperate with the contact point 36 when the armature moves to the right as viewed in Figure 1 due to the energization of the reset coil 23.

A conductor 47 passes through the end head 39 and is electrically connected to the sleeve 20, the connection being extended to the armature via portions of the surface of the armature in contact with the sleeve and via the spring loaded balls 32 and 33.

The end head 39 is also provided with Insulating bushings 48 and 49 through which the lead wires 50 and 51, forming the terminals of the reset coil 23 pass.

The end head 40 and its boss 42 is bored out and fitted with an insulating bushing carrying a contact member 46 having a head formed thereon to cooperate with the contact point 37 carried on the end 25 of the armature, when the latter is at the extreme left (Fig. 1) due to the energization of the actuating coil 22.

The left end head 40 is also provided with insulating bushings 52 and 53 through which the lead wires 54 and 55, forming the terminals of the coil 22, pass.

After the relay is assembled a sealing compound of a suitable plastic material is applied as an outer casing or enclosing envelope 56.

The armature 21 has a slot 57 milled in its outer surface parallel to the center line thereof, the function of which will presently be described.

The action of the spring loaded balls 32. and 33 against the slanting surface of the conical frustrum 26 resiliently holds the contact members 37 and 46 together, with a minimum of con76 tact resistance, when the armature is in one normal position. Likewise the action of these balls against the slanting surface of the conical frustrum 27 holds the contact members 36 and 4( together when the armature is in its other normal position. This spring action also propels the armature along in the sleeve for a portion of its stroke and aids the action of each of the coils when they are energized.

This may be illustrated by referring to Fig. 1, with the armature in the position shown, assume that the coil 23 is energized via its terminals 50 and 51. The armature starts to move toward the left and as soon as the spring loaded balls pass off of the surface of conical frustrum 26, past the midline 28 and on to the surface of the frustrum 27, the action of the spring loaded balls against slanting surface of 27 aids the action of the coil 23 in propelling the armature 20 to the right (Fig. 1) and when the contact member 36 engages 44 the action of the balls against the surface of 27 resiliently holds the members 36 and 44 into intimate contact.

The diagrammatic sketch, Fig. 12, shows a method of connecting the relay up to control two circuits. A source of current is indicated at 60, a circuit closing means 61 is shown as associated with the coil 22, and another circuit closing means is shown as associated with the coil 23. When the coil 22 is energized by closing 61, contact is established between contacts 37 and 46 and a circuit connected to 58 may be controlled. Likewise, when the coil 23 is energized due to the closing of 62, contact is established between contacts 36 and 44, and a circuit connected to 59 may be controlled. The slot 57 in the armature 21 may be of an appreciable depth to cut down eddy currents within the material of which it is formed and thereby increase to some extent the speed at which the armature operates. A suitable lubricant such as deflocculated graphite or a very light oil may be placed in the slot 57 before the relay is assembled and will last for the life of the relay, due to the protection afforded by the envelope 56 against dust and the humidity of the atmosphere. In the modification shown in Figures 2 and 3 a sleeve 63 has a V-shaped groove 64 formed therein extending inwardly toward the centerline of the tube. The armature 65 has a V-shaped groove 66 turned therein near the center of its length. A cross hole 67 is drilled in the armature having its center in line with the bottom line of the V-shaped groove 66. A longitudinal hole 70 is drilled in the armature from one end thereof to and communicating with the cross hole 67. 5.This hole carries a ball i7 which contacts balls 69 and 70 in the cross hole 67, and a spring 72 and the contact point 73 is forced in and serves as a retainer for the spring 72. The other end of the armature has a shallow hole drilled therein to ac- GO commodate the contact point 74.

In making the sleeve-armature assembly, the armature is placed in a straight sleeve and the V-shaped groove 64 is rolled into the sleeve, after which the armature cannot be removed. The three balls are placed in through the hole 70, followed by the spring 72 and the contact point 73 which forms a tight fit with the hole and serves as a retainer for the spring and balls. In the other end of the armature the contact point 74 is forced into the shallow hole provided for that purpose.

A center head 75 is placed on the sleeve 63 and the coils 22 and 23 are put thereon on either side of the center head 75.

End heads 39 and 40 similar to those described' in connection with Figure 1 are assembled with their respective bosses 41 and 42 extending into the sleeve 63, the connections to the sleeve and to the coils extending through insulating bushings in the heads 39 and 40, and an outer sleeve 38 is provided to complete the path of the magnetic flux.

The pressure of the spring 72, via the ball 71 is imparted to the balls 69 and 70 and they in turn press against the slanting sides of the groove 64, giving a "toggle" action effect to the armature. This action is in effect the same as the action of the embodiment shown and described in Figure 1, the difference being that in Figure 2 the spring loaded bails are carried by the armature and act against the slanting sides of the Vshaped groove formed in the sleeve 63, while in Figure 1 the spring loaded balls are carried by the sleeve, and the slanting sides of the conical frustrums are integral with the armature 21.

A further modification is shown in Figure 7 in which the sleeve 20, the arrangement of the spring loaded balls 32 and 33, as well as the heads 29, 39, and 40 is the same as that in Figure 1.

The armature 21 has the conical frustrums 26 and 27 which cooperate with the balls 32 and 33 in the same manner as described for Figure 1.

The armature has a hole 76 drilled therethrough on substantially its center line. Balls 77 and 18 are placed in the hole 76 with a spring 19 between.

The edges of the hole 76 at each end of the armature are spun over just sufficiently to retain the balls within the hole. These balls are used as contact members.

The right end head 39 and the left end head 40 have mounted in their respective insulating bushings 43 and 45 stationary contact members 80 and 81. The inner ends of these members are provided with concave curved faces adapted to be contacted by the balls 78 and 77 respectively.

The radius of the curved faces may be greater than or less than the radius of the balls 77 and 18 so that more than "point" contact may be obtained and so that, due to the resiliency of the ball with its associated spring, a wiping or selfcleaning connection between each ball and its cooperating member is obtained each time the relay is operated.

In the arrangement shown in Figure 4, the xrmature 82 is a round rod of any desired permeability, slotted at one end. A rectangular slab of bakelite or other suitable insulation 83 is positioned in the slotted end and secured to the armature 82 in any suitable manner; so that when the armature moves, the slab moves therewith.

A metallic insert 84 is set in flush with the lower surface of the slab 83 and ears 85 and 86 integral with 84 are flush with the upper surface of the 60' slab 83. In the embodiment shown the insert is substantially rectangular (Fig. 6) and the ears 85 and 86 are diagonally disposed in the upper surface of the slab of insulation 83 within the confines of the insert 84.

A cartridge 87 containing a spring 88 and a ball 89 is positioned below the slab 83 in such manner that the ball 89, under pressure of the spring 88, makes contact with the insert 84 for both positions of the armature.

Two cartridges 90 and 93 are supported side by side above and in contact with the slab 83 and, for convenience, in line with the cartridge 88.

The cartridge 90 contains a spring 91 and a ball 92, and the cartridge 93 contains a spring and a ball 94. With the cartridges 90 and 93 positioned as shown (Figure 6) the ball 92 contacts with the ear 85, and the ball 94 in the cartridge 93 rests on insulation of which the slab 83 is composed, when the armature 82 is in the position shown in Figure 4. With the conductors 95 and 96 included in an external circuit, this circuit would be completed when the armature is in the position shown, due to the energization of the coil 22.

When the coil 23 is energized the armature 82 moves to the right as viewed in Figure 4 and comes to rest against the stop 95 in the end head 96, at which time electrical connection between the balls 89 and 92 is broken due to the movement of the ear 85 out of the range of the ball 92, and connection between the balls 89 and 94 is established due to the fact that the ear 86 now engages the ball 94. The end head 97 is provided with an insert 98 of insulation to overcome any possibility of contact between the metallic insert 84 or the ear 85 coming in contact of metallic parts of the relay proper. The sleeve 20 in this case is a plain straight tube. The armature 82, the end heads 96 and 97 and the outer sleeve 36 may be made of iron or steel of any desired permeability.

In the modification shown in Figure 9, the construction may be the same as that shown in Figure 1 or Figure 7 with the exception that a disk 98 is placed between the ball 32 and the spring 34, and a rod 99 passes through a hole in the sleeve 38 and the envelope 56, and rests on the disk 98. A pair of contact arms 101 and 102 are insulated from each other and are insulatedly supported on the relay. The arm 101 on its un- 3 derside is provided with a button of insulation 100, against which the outer end of the rod rests.

The arms 101 and 102 are provided, respectively, with contact points 104 and 103, so arranged that contact is established momentarily between these points when the armature is nioving and the ball 32 rides over the midline 28, the high point of the combined slanting surfaces 26 and 21.

This makes it possible to establish a circuit or institute an impulse at a point half way between the time the armature contacts engage 44 and 46. As an example of the use of this modification is the inclusion of the contact arms 101 and 102 in a circuit with a source of current and an electrical counter which would indicate the number of times the relay has operated.

In the modification shown in Figure 8 the armature 21 is provided with rods 105 and 106 extending through the end heads. A yoke 107 is secured to the outer ends of the rods 105 and 106, and the armature 21, the rods 105 and 106, and the yoke 107 move as one when the windings 22 or 23 (Fig. 1) are energized.

The relay is provided with a support 109 carrying a pivot shaft II . A switch holder 110 is pivoted on the pivot shaft 111 and is provided with a slot 112 which is engaged by a pin 108 carried by the yoke 107. A mercury tube switch 113 is supported on the member 110 by means of the straps 114. When the armature 21 moves in one direction the mercury switch rocks in the opposite direction whereby one circuit connected to the latter may be broken and another circuit connected thereto may be closed. When the armature moves in the other direction the action of the switch is the reverse of that stated above.

SIn mounting a plurality of these relays in groups, two bakelite strips I I and 116 are provided with recesses which face each other and support the relays therebetween. In the outer surfaces, opposite to the recesses the strip II1 is provided with a plurality of longitudinal slots 17 and I 1, and the strip 118 is provided with slots 119, 120 and 121. These slots communicate with the recesses through holes. The lead wires, conductors and the end head conductors extend through these holes and cables for connecting to these conductors etc. lie in these slots as shown in Figure 11 and effect the desired connections without extending beyond the surfaces of the strips I 1 and 116.

Many changes may be made in the embodiments shown and described without departing from the spirit of the invention as defined by the appended claims.

What is claimed is: 1. In a relay, a sleeve, a pair of coils embracing said sleeve, a permeable magnetic core forming an armature adapted to reciprocate within said sleeve, a contact point on each end of said armature, a permeable end head secured to each end of said sleeve, an outer sleeve embracing said coils and supported by said end heads forming a return path for magnetic flux generated by either of said coils, stationary contact members supported within said sleeve by said end heads, one of said contact points being adapted to engage the contact member carried by one of said heads when the armature is in one extreme position and the other contact point adapted to engage the contact member in the other of said heads when the armature is in an extreme position opposite said 5 first position, and spring means embraced by said outer sleeve for retaining the armature in either of said positions.

2. In a relay, a sleeve having a highly finished bore, a center head mounted on said sleeve and having openings formed therein communicating with the interior bore of said sleeve, a pair of coils mounted on said sleeve, one being positioned on each side of said center head, a movable permeable magnetic core positioried within said sleeve and adapted to move in one direction when one of said coils is energized and adapted to move in the opposite direction when the other of said coils is energized, an end head secured to each end of said sleeve, an outer permeable magnetic sleeve carried by said end heads and enclosing both said coils, contact members Insulatedly supported within said sleeve on each of said end heads, contact points on each end of said core adapted to engage one of said contact members in either extreme position of said core, and spring means engaging said core via the openings in said center head adapted to resiliently hold the core in each of said extreme positions.

3. A relay as claimed in claim 2 in which the movable core has its midportion cut away to form two opposed conical frustrums having a common base line, and in which the spring means engages the surfaces of said frustrums and after riding over the common base line of said frustrums, due to the movement of said core, impels and facilltates further movement of and resiliently holds said core with a contact point engaging a contact member in either extreme position of the core.

4. In a relay of the character described a body having a hollow center sleeve with a pair of magnet coils wound thereon, a center head mounted on said sleeve between said coils and having openings formed therein communicating with the hollow interior of said center sleeve, a core adapted to reciprocate in said hollow, heads positioned at each end of said sleeve and each containing a contact member projecting into the hollow of said center sleeve and adapted to limit the movement of said core in each direction of movement, contact points carried by said core and adapted to engage said contact members, and spring means carried in said openings engaging said core within said center sleeve and resiliently holding the same in each of its extreme positions.

5. In a relay of the character described, a body having a hollow center sleeve with a pair of magnet coils wound thereon and a core adapted to reciprocate in said hollow, its movement being limited by heads at each end of said sleeve, contact members carried by said heads and extending concentrically into the hollow of said center sleeve, and contact points on each end of said core adapted to cooperate with said contact members, said core having its mid-portion so formed that, when engaged by spring means extending through said body between said coils, upon the energization of either of said coils the movement of said core is at first impeded and then facilitated by said spring means.

LINCOLN M. KEEE.