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Title:
Electric hemostat or cautery
United States Patent 2050904
Abstract:
This invention relates to an improved electric instrument adapted for use as a hemostat or as a cautery, and particularly adapted for use with safety in stopping hemorrhages or for treating infections within the uterine or other cavities of the human body. The primary object of the present...


Inventors:
Talley, Trice Spencer
Application Number:
US75488834A
Publication Date:
08/11/1936
Filing Date:
11/26/1934
Assignee:
Talley, Trice Spencer
Primary Class:
Other Classes:
219/235, 606/29
International Classes:
A61B18/08
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Description:

This invention relates to an improved electric instrument adapted for use as a hemostat or as a cautery, and particularly adapted for use with safety in stopping hemorrhages or for treating infections within the uterine or other cavities of the human body.

The primary object of the present invention is to improve instruments of the above kind in which the cautery tip constitutes a resistance or heating element, and wherein said tip is of such form as to insure use of the instrument with safety within the uterine or other cavity.

A further object is to provide an instrument of the above character which is extremely simple and durable in construction, economical to manufacture, and efficient in use.

The nature and the details of the present invention will be readily understood from the following description when considered in connection with the accompanying drawing, in which: Figure 1 is an elevational view of an electric hemostat or cautery embodying the present invention; and Figure 2 is a central longitudinal sectional view thereof.

Referring in detail to the drawing, the present instrument includes a rigid slender elongated shank 5 whose inner end is enlarged to provide a handle 6, said shank and its integral handle portion being of solid form and made of suitable insulating material or material which is a nonconductor of electricity. The present instrument further includes a cautery tip 7 consisting of a hollow bulbous shell formed of German silver, tungsten steel, or other suitable metal possessing the desired ohmic resistance so that the tip may directly constitute an electric heating or resistance element. Embedded in and extending longitudinally of the shank 5 and its handle portion 6 throughout the entire length of the same are electric conductors 8 and 9 whose outer ends are extended into the hollow cautery tip 7 and directly attached to the latter as at 10 and 11. The outer ends of the conductors 8 and 9 are attached to suitable insulated lead wires 12 and 13 adapted for connection with a suitable source of electrical energy, which energy may be controlled in a well known manner by a rheostat of the ordinary type so that the tip 7 may be heated to the desired degree or temperature. The cautery tip 7 preferably consists of a hollow body having a restricted neck 14 suitably fitted and secured over the outer end of shank 5, and the size and shape of the hollow body portion of this tip may of course be varied to suit requirements. Due to the bulbous form of the cautery tip 7, it provides only rounded external surfaces to contact with the body and permit the use of the instrument within the uterine or other cavity with complete safety. A suitable resistor 15, herein illustrated as a helical resistance coil, may be incorporated in the conductor 9 and embedded in the handle portion 6 of the shank 5. The purpose of this resistor is to limit heating of the tip 7 to a temperature so that it will only sear or will not severely burn tissue with which it is contacted, when the instrument is operated by ordinary house current. At the same time, the resistor is such that it will warm but will not over- 15 heat the handle 6, thereby permitting the handle to be held without discomfort.

In use, the lead-in wires 12 and 13 are connected with the source of electricity and the latter is suitably controlled to properly energize the cautery tip 7 so that the latter is heated.

The device is then applied to the part of the body to be treated with the tip 7 contacting such part for lightly searing the same or applying heat thereto for the purpose of stopping a hemorrhage or producing a curative and healing effect in case of infections, etc.

The present instrument is made of suitable material so that it will not warp out of shape when sterilized in a boiling liquid. Also, the shank of the device may be made in any desired bent shape, or the tip may be made to extend at any desired angle to the shank, as required for most efficiently performing different types of operations or treatments. From the foregoing description, when considered in connection with the drawing, it will be seen that I have provided an extremely simple and efficient instrument which may be conveniently and safely used for the intended purposes. It is of course not compulsory to use a rheostat to regulate the current and thereby control the temperature to which the cautery tip is heated.

What I claim as new is: An electrical hemostat or cautery comprising a handle, and a cautery tip mounted on one end of said handle, said cautery tip comprising a hollow bulbous shell of metal and constituting an electrical resistance element, and electric conductors attached to said cautery tip, said electric conductors extending through said handle and attached to said cautery tip internally of the latter, and a resistor incorporated in one of said conductors to limit heating of said tip, substantially as described. SPENCER TALLEY TRICE.