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Title:
Flooring
United States Patent 2046593
Abstract:
This invention has to do with flooring and relates in particular to a floor board in modification of a conventional tongue and groove board and an improved means for anchoring such modified board in position. It is an object of the present invention to provide a novel and improved means for...


Inventors:
Urbain, Leon F.
Application Number:
US60968932A
Publication Date:
07/07/1936
Filing Date:
05/06/1932
Assignee:
LUG LOX FLOORING COMPANY
Primary Class:
Other Classes:
52/592.1
International Classes:
E04F15/04
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Description:

This invention has to do with flooring and relates in particular to a floor board in modification of a conventional tongue and groove board and an improved means for anchoring such modified board in position.

It is an object of the present invention to provide a novel and improved means for mounting channel members so that a permanent resilience is produced in a floor comprising floor boards laid upon the channels.

Another object of the present invention is to provide a new and novel clip member which is slidably contained in a channel base for holding the end boards of a floor thereto.

Another object of the present invention is the provision of a new type of tongue and groove floor board which may be secured in assembled position with other like boards by means of a channel and clips for commonly engaging the boards.

Still another object of the present invention is the provision of an improved form of clip for use with floor boards held in place upon channels and which clip is adapted to being fed from a machine having a clip holding magazine.

Another object of the invention is an improved combination of floor board, and holding means therefor.

With these and other desirable objects of the present invention in view, the description thereof is hereinafter set forth with reference to the accompanying single sheet of drawing hereby made a part of the specification, and in which: Figure 1 is a transverse section of an improved type of floor board embodying the invention and taken in perspective; Figure 2 illustrates an end clip for such board and the manner in which such form of clip engages the edge of a floor board to be concealed by a base board and a quarter round; Figure 3 is an elevation of the clip shown in Figure 2 and taken on the line 3-3 in Figure 2; Figure 4 is an end view of an elevated channel; Figure 5 is a plan view of the elevated channel shown in Figure 4; Figure 6 is a perspective view of a second form of elevated channel; Figure 7 is a view taken in perspective illustrating the assembly of an improved form of clip with a floor board and channel; Figure 8 is an orthographic projection of the clip shown in Figure 7; Figure 9 is a side elevation of the clip shown in Figures 7 and 8.

Like reference characters are used to designate similar parts in the drawing and in the description which follows.

In Figure 1, a board 20 is shown in angular perspective. Such board is a modification of g several types of boards described in co-pending applications of Leon F. Urbain and Frank-W.

Cherry, bearing Serial Numbers 539,766 and 557,594, entitled Flooring, and filed under dates of May 15, 1931 and August 17, 1931, respectively.

The board 20 is a tongue and groove type of board in that it has below a narrow vertical section 21, a tongue 22, and on the opposite edge a narrow vertical face 23 above a groove 24 and of equal depth to the face 2 . When several of the boards 20 are laid within a floor, the grooves 24 are adapted to receive the tongues 22 of adjacent boards.

Below the tongue 22 is a narrow groove 25. Next beneath the groove 25 is a section 26 which usually is offset inwardly of the board from the section 21. At the opposite side of the board is a second groove 27 extending inwardly of the material beneath the groove 24, and a narrow section 28 below the groove 27. The section 28 may be offset inwardly of the board relative to the section 23.

The bottom of the board may have therein an inverted channel section 29, as is the customary practice in the milling of floor boards. Angular sections 30 and 31 may be formed between the sections 28 and 26 and the bottom of the board.

An end of the board 20 may have a contour similar to the right hand edge of the board shown in Figure 1 while the opposite end of the board may be not unlike the left edge of the board shown in that figure. To treat the board ends in this manner is not necessary for a carpenter may cut a groove therein while laying them if desired. Grooves 25 and 27 are at the same elevation and are so formed in manufacture. The grooves at the end of the board whether formed in manufacture or by a carpenter will register with the grooves 25 and 27 so that a groove is effected entirely about the board along its lateral edges. The ends of the board being configured as are the sides make it possible to abut the ends of the boards into assembly in the same manner as the sides. Grooves 25 and 27 provide that a number of boards 20 may be anchored into selected assembly upon a floor by means of clips (not shown).

Such clips are placed intermediate the edges of the adjacent boards and have tongues articulated in opposite directions therefrom to project respectively into the grooves 25 and 27 of the boards in assembled opposed relation thereto.

Since the sections 26 and 28 are offset from the sections 21 and 23, a space is provided between the lower opposed sections of assembled boards for accommodating a clip between the boards that the lower body of the clip may extend downwardly for engaging a sub-structure. The sub-structure may consist of a number of channel members 32 shown in Figure 2 and which may be arranged in a parallel formation.

The lower body of the clips for holding the boards in place may have notches in either side thereof for engaging the flanges 33 of the channels. Channels 32 are arranged to lie in one direction upon the floor while the boards 201 are arranged flatly thereon and at right, angles to the direction in which the channel members are-laid. After the channels 32 have been placed upon a floor it is the ordinary procedure to lay the flooring boards by starting at a side of the floor and at the ends of the channels. The first board thus laid adjacentto the wall may be held in place by a clip 3 shown in Figure:2. Clip 34 comprises;a lower body 35 having notches 36- in opposite sides thereof.

The upper body 37 of the clip 34 is bent at ninety degrees to the lower body and at a distance measurably spaced from the notches 36 so that said upper body will lie flatly upon the top of a board 20 placed thereunder. Channels 32' and clips 34 other than those shown in Figure 2 are distributed at desired intervals along the length of the board 20. The flanges 33 permit of the sliding of the clips 34 and the board 20 longitudinally of the channels, but the notches: 36 prevent the lifting of the-clips fromn the channel or movement laterally of said channel.

After the clips 34 have been placed within the channel 32 and a board 20-has been inserted beneath the upper body 3T of the clips, both the clips and board are slid into position against the wall. A screw 38 may provide a connection between the upper part of the clip 34 and the floor board.

The advantage of such-a clip as the clip 34 is that it takes very little space between the end board 20 and a wall 39, the latter-being shown schematically in Figure 2. Subsequently to -the placing of the board adjacent to the wall 39:the moulding 40 and quarter-round'4 may be placed thereover to entirely conceal the clips.

With the-first board 20 thus laid as described a second board 20 is brought Up along side to the outer edge of the laid board and in a manner to bring the groove 24 thereof adjacent to the tongue 22 of the laid board. Disposed within the channels between the two- boards will be clips heretofore described as having tongues articulated in opposite directions and for holding the adjacent-edges of the two boards flatly to the channels. tIt is not proposed that the tongues 22 upon the boards 20 shall assist materially in holding the boards into the assembled position, but that the tongues shall only serveĀ·as a- means for :guiding the -boards into place. Hence, the tongues 22 do not- project so far from the edge of the board as do the tongues of the conventional o7 tongue and groove board. The groove 24 is cut narrower than the groove upon the ordinary tongue and groove board so that in every board there is a saving in lumber.

A.desirable characteristic of. all floors is that they be of a somewhat resilient nature. This is particularly true of floors in the home or in a ballroom where there is a great deal of walking. To accomplish this in wooden floors, it has been the practice to space the joists at goodly intervals and to depend upon the natural springlike qualities of the wood to gain the effect. After such a floor has been in use for a period of time, the boards become set and lose their spring-like qualities.

In Figures 4 and 5 a form of channel which has an integral support is illustrated. In said form of the invention, the channel 42 comprises a bottom 42a, side members projecting therefrom and. indicated by the numeral 42b, and inwardly, directed flanges 42c. In this channel the clips C are adapted to be disposed. Cut from the bottom 42a at spaced intervals are tongues 43, the end of each tongue being turned to form a base 44. Through the tongue 43 are apertures 45 and in the base there may be an aperture 45a to receive aa -fastening member (not shown). The channel illustrated is formed by the usual-folding and stamping operation during which the tongue is turned normaL to the bottom 42a of the channel and the tab 44 is bent to a-right angletto the tongue 43.

In such form of channel. filling-in: material may be built around the channel and may -be caused to project through the apertures 45 to make a firmer joinder than could otherwise be had. The position of the tongues 43 is one of choice and they. may be spaced different .distances apart according to the stress which may be applied to the floor which is mounted upon a channel member. In such form of the invention, conduits and pipes may be run beneath the channel and the height of the channel from the supporting base will be regulated accordingly.

The length of the tongue is used for determining the height to which the channel will be raised above the supporting base.

In Figure 6 a second form- of elevated channel is illustrated. The channel comprises a bottom or base 46, vertical sides 46a projecting therefrom, and inturned flanges 46b. Integral with the channel or secured thereto are obliquely disposed legs 48. At the end of the legs 48are outwardly turned members 49 adapted to rest upon the base andito be attached thereto. The legs 48 may have apertures 50 therein and holes orapertures 51 may be provided in the lower tab for fastening members. The apertures 50 provide for the joinder of a filling-in material on opposite sides thereof providing such material is used.

Spot welding may be resorted to to secure the legs which may be in a single piece to the channel.

If preferred, the legs may be made vertical and if desired, of course, the supporting tabs may be turned inwardly.

In this form of the invention like that illustrated in Figures 4 and 5, the floor boards are raised above the supporting member providing space for conduits, pipes and for filling-in material if desired.

A floor disposed upon either of the elevated channels will possess a natural springiness which will be lasting. When a floor is disposed upon such elevated channels, as for example, a dance floor, the wooden floor will not have to depend upon its own inherent elasticity. On the other hand, elasticity will be due in the greater proportion to the manner in which the floor boards are elevated, and this elasticity will continue long after the time when dance floors made in the conventional manner become "set". It is well known that springy wooden floors disposed upon wooden sleepers, after a time lose their elasticity and become "set". This will not be true in a floor of the type herein illustrated for the elas"5 ticity will be due to the supports rather than to the floor itself.

A type of board which may either be anchored into place upon channels such as are shown in this specification, or which may be nailed to joists in the usual manner is shown in Figure 7.

The board 57 has a tongue 58 on one side with vertical sections 59 and 60 on either side thereof.

The section 60 is offset inwardly of the board to the section 59. At the other side of the board is a section 6 1 above a groove 62 and a lower section 63. Section 63 is set in relative to the section 61 as is the section 60 with reference to section 59.

The groove 62 is of the same width as is the tongue 58 so that when several of the boards are brought together in the proper manner, the tongues 58 will project into the grooves 62 so that the sections at 59 and 61 may be brought flatly together. Sections 60 and 63 being separated by a lesser distance than the sections 59 and 6 will not be in contact with one another in the assembled floor, but will have a space therebetween. Such a board as the board 57 has sufficient material along its edges that it may be nailed into place within a floor in the usual manner.

The fact that the boards 57 when laid within a floor are only contiguous along their upper sections 59 and 61 provides that the floor if subjected to moisture to cause a swelling, will not buckle upwardly at the edges of the boards, but rather will have a tendency to turn downwardly.

However, the material of the adjacent boards will prevent the flange turning downwardly and the floor will remain flat. Where there is a pressure along the entire faces of joined boards within a floor, or if the sections 60 and 63 were in contact, there would be also a pressure along those sections when the floor tended to expand which would counteract the tendency of the upper sections of the board to turn downwardly. As a result Ihe pressure between the upper sections at the edges of the boards would cause them to curl up.

A clip 64 suitable for holding boards 57 to a channel 64a is shown in Figures 7, 8 and 9. The clip has a lower body 65 with notches 66 along either side. Above the notches 66 are lugs 67.

The upper body of the clip 64 comprises wings 68 defined one from the other by a groove 69. Both of the wings 68 are curved as better shown in Figure 9 and at a radius to make the body of the wings conform to the sectional contour of the tongue 58. Notches 66 of the clip 64 are of a width and depth to receive the flanges 69 at the opposite edges of the channel 64a.

The lower body of the clip 64 is readily received within the space between sections 60 and 63 of the assembled boards and does not interfere in any way with bringing the boards together. Since the tongue 58 upon the sides of the boards is relatively thin and the material of the boards is comparatively soft, a rap upon the back of the wings 68 will embed them into the material of the tongue to cause the outer face of the wings to lie in alinement with the longitudinal elements of the tongue 58 on either side of the wings. Then no part of the body of the clips 64 used in assembling boards 57 into a floor will interfere in any way with the bringing of the boards together. Clips 64 provide an efficacious and expedient way of securing the boards to a sub-base.

Lugs 67 are provided upon the side of the clips to adapt the clips to fit into the magazine of a device for inserting them into the channels. In the types of floor boards set forth in this specification it has been the object to provide sections below the tongue and groove of the boards to be separated by less material than the sections adjacent the top face of the board and which are to be brought in contact when the floor is assembled.

This spacing of the sections has been for two reasons. The first reason is to provide a space for the body of the clip which is used for holding the boards in place upon a suitable base, and the second reason is to preclude the touching of the lower sections so that an expansion of the floor will not cause the edges of the boards to buckle upwardly. In each instance both sections at the lower edges of the boards have been described as being offset inwardly of the board from the upper section. It is possible that the desired space between the lower edges of the assembled boards may be obtained by offsetting but one lower edge of the boards by a greater amount, and by leaving the opposite lower edge in vertical alinement with the section thereabove.

What is claimed as new and is desired to secure by Letters Patent of the United States is: 1. For holding tongue and groove floor boards to a base, a clip comprising a lower body with slots for engaging said base, and an upper body articulated in a manner to fit about the tongue of one board and into the groove of the contiguous board.

2. A clip for anchoring tongue and groove floor boards to a base, said clip comprising a lower body with slots for engaging said base, an upper body articulated to embrace the tongue of one board and fit into the groove of the contiguous board, and means for engaging a clip holding magazine.

3. In a floor, parallel channel members having inwardly turned flanges at their upper long edges, tongued and grooved boards resting on and crosswise of said channel members, clips rising from the channel members, each of said clip members having in opposite edges thereof notches to receive the flanges of the corresponding channel member to lock the clip against vertical movement while permitting it to slide lengthwise of the channel member, each clip extending into the joint between two of the boards and fitting over the tongue and nesting in the groove forming part of that joint, and each board having on the grooved side thereof a groove wider than the tongue upon the adjacent board in said floor.

4. In a floor, a foundation, boards laid edge to edge on said foundation and joined by tongues and grooves, clips rising from the foundation and interlocked therewith for sliding movements at right angles to said tongues and grooves and against vertical movements, each clip having a hook part at the upper end embracing the edge of and biting into the top of one of said tongues close to said edge and nested in the groove in which that tongue is engaged. 5. A clip for anchoring tongue and groove floor boards to a base, said clip comprising a lower body adapted to engage said base, and an upper body articulated in a manner to fit about the tongue on one board and into the groove of the contiguous board, and to bite into the tongue near the edge thereof.

6. For holding tongue and groove floor boards to a base, a clip comprising a lower body with slots for engaging said base, and an upper body articulated in a manner to fit about the tongue of one board and into the groove of the contiguous board and to bite into the tongue near the edge thereof.

7. A clip for anchoring tongue and groove floor boards to a base, said clip comprising a lower body with slots for engaging said base, an upper body articulated to embrace the tongue of one board and fit into the groove of the contiguous board and to bite into the tongue near the edge thereof, and means for engaging a clip holding magazine.

LEON F. URBAIN.