Title:
Bed davenport
United States Patent 2028426


Abstract:
It is the object of my invention to produce an article of furniture which can be readily converted from a davenport into a bed. More specifically, it is my object to produce a structure of this type which will be stable in both positions of adjustment and in which the operating mechanism is...



Inventors:
Wunderlich, William E.
Application Number:
US71083634A
Publication Date:
01/21/1936
Filing Date:
02/12/1934
Assignee:
MOORE CO
Primary Class:
Other Classes:
5/55.1
International Classes:
A47C17/175
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Description:

It is the object of my invention to produce an article of furniture which can be readily converted from a davenport into a bed. More specifically, it is my object to produce a structure of this type which will be stable in both positions of adjustment and in which the operating mechanism is simple and sturdy and of such a nature that it can readily be concealed by the upholstering of the article.

In carrying out .my invention I provide two pivotally connected frames, one of which acts as a seat-frame and the other of which acts as a back-frame, and I connect the back-frame to the base or frame of the davenport by a set of links 5 so that it can be swung from a vertical to a horizontal position, the links being so arranged that as the back is swung from a vertical to a horizontal position its lower end moves inwardly of the base. Acting between the back-frame and :0 the seat-frame I provide a strut which, when in operative position serves to maintain the backframe and seat-frame in normal angular relationship but which can be released to permit the two frames to be swung into co-planar relation5 ship.

The accompanying drawings illustrate my invention: Fig. 1 is a vertical section through the frame of a bed-davenport on the line i-I of Fig. 4 showing the seat and back in end elevation, 0 parts of the structure being broken away to show the construction more clearly; Fig. 2 is a view similar to Fig. 1 showing the parts of the structure in different positions; Fig. 3 is a view similar to Fig. 2, but on an enlarged scale, show5 ink in detail the means for controlling the angular relationship of the seat and back; Fig. 4 is a fragmental plan view of the structure in extended position; and Fig. 5 is a'vertical section on the line 5-5 of Mg. 4.

) In the drawings, the frame or base of the davenport is shown as embodying front and rear longitudinal members II and 12. These, in conjunction with arm-forming ends 13 and a bottom S4, form a hollow box-like -tructure adapted to i contain bedding. At each end of the base, there extends across it relatively heavy cross-members upon which the back and seat of the davenport are mounted, through the medium of L-, shaped brackets 16.

I The seat of the davenport is built upon a frame having front and rear longitudinal members 20 and 21, end members 22, and intermediate cross members 23, the latter of which serve as supports for open-wound upholstery springs 24. The back Sof the davenport is built upon a generally similar frame having top and bottom longitudinal members 26 and 27, end members 28, and intermediate cross members 29 carrying upholstery springs 30.

As is clear from Fig. 1, the two sections (seat and back) of the davenport are covered with suitable upholstering material.

The ends 21' of the rear longitudinal member 21 of the seat frame are bent generally upwardly, and the inner ends 22' of the end members 22 are also bent generally upwardly in parallel but spaced relationship to the upwardly bent ends 21' of the rear longitudinal member. The two ends 27' of the lower longitudinal member 27 of the back frame and the lower ends 28' of the end members 28 are bent forwardly to interfit with the bent ends of the rear longitudinal member and the two end members of the seat frame, these interfitting ends being ,iyotally connected by a pivot pin or bolt 31.

At each end of the seat frame there is pivotally mounted a link 32 provided with a slot 33 adapted to receive a pin or stud 34 mounted in the back frame. Conveniently, the pin 34 and the axis of pivotal connection between the link 32 and the seat frame are located about in the planes of the bodies of the respective frames. At its rear end, the slot 33 is relieved in its upper surface as at 35 to provide a shoulder 36 engageable with the pin 34 under the influence of the force of gravity acting upon the lik 32. As long as the link 32 is permitted to swing downwardly about its axis of pivotal connection between the seat frame, the pin 34 will occupy the relieved portion 35 of the slot 33 so that relative angular movement of the seat frame and back frame about the axis of the pins 31 by which they are pivotally interconnected is limited. .That is, the two sides of the relief 35 act as abutments cooperating with a third abutment in the form of the pin 34 to hold the seat and back frames in definite angular relationship. The seat-frame and back-ffame of the davenport'are connected to the base by means of a pair of links 40 and 41 located at each end of the davenport. These links are pivoted at spaced points to the bracket 16 and extend generally upwardly, their free ends being pivotally connected to spaced points on the back-frame. Conveniently, the inner link 41 at each end of the davenport has.its free end connected to the back-frame by the pivot-pin 31, while the free end of the link 40 is connepted to a forwardly projecting- extension 42 on the adjacent end member 28 of the back-frame.

The links 40 and 41 are of such a length and their respective points of pivotal attachment to the. back-frame 16 are so located that as the back-frame swings rearwardly .its lower end is carried inwardly of the base of the davenport, so that when the back-frame reaches the horizontal position illustrated in Fig. 2 the pivot pin 31 will be approximately mid-way between the longitudinal front and rear members II and 12 of the davenport-base.

Because of the presence of each pin 34 within the relief 35 in its associated link 32 and the consequent fixed angular relationship of the seat-frame and back-frame, the seat-frame moves from the horizontal position illustrated in Fig. 1 to the generally vertical position shown in full lines in Fig. 2 as the back-frame moves from the position shown in Fig. 1 to the horizontal position shown in Fig. 2, the seat-frame being held in the full-line position of Fig. 2 by reason of the engagement of the shoulder 36 with the pin 34. It is therefore apparent that by lifting the free ends of the links 32 to disengage the shoulders 36 from the pins 34 the seat-frame can be lowered to the horizontal position illustrated in dotted lines in Fig. 2, thus completing the transformation of the davenport into a bed.

For the purpose of moving the links 32 to disengage them from their associated pins 34, the link-operating mechanism shown in the drawings may be employed. This mechanism comprises a rod 45 which extends longitudinally of the seat frame near the rear edge thereof and which is so mounted that it can be rocked about its axis. At each end, the rod 45 is bent outwardly to provide a crank 46 the free outer end of which is (disposed beneath the adjacent link 32. At an intermediate point, conveniently near its center, the rod 45 is distorted to provide a U-shaped operating crank 47 (see Figs. 4 and 5) by means of which it can be rocked.

In the mechanism illustrated in the drawings, the seat-frame Is provided adjacent the crank 47 with a bearing block 48 which is slotted to receive sliqably an operating member 49. The operating member 49 is conveniently a flat strip of sheet-metal extending transversely of the seatframe and having its rear end bent upwardly and formed into an eye embracing the intermediate portion of the crank 47. The front end of the operating member may be slotted as at' 50 for the reception of a guide-pin 51 in the front longitudinal member 20 of the seat-frame. A fingerpiece 52 is secured to and depends from the operating member 49 to provide an abutment which can be engaged by the fingers of the operator to move the operating member 49 forwardly, and thus to rock the rod 45 and lift the links 32.

In Fig. 5, the operating member 49 and the rod 45 are shown in the positions they occupy when the cranks 46 are depressed to permit the links 32 to drop under the influence of gravity.

This position of the cranks 46 is illustrated in Figs. 1 and 2 and in full-lines in Fig. 3. When it is desired to lift the links 32, the finger piece 52 is grasped and moved forwardly thus rocking the rpd 45 in a clockwise direction (Figs. 1, 2, 3, and 5). Such movement of the rod 45 causes the free ends of the cranks 46 to engage the links 32 and to lift them until the shoulder 36 is raised clear of engagement with the pin 34. This permits the seat-frame Po be swung downwardly from the full-line positions illustrated in Figs. 2 and 3 to the dotted-line positions illustrated in those figures. .

It is to be noted that by reason of the construction illustrated in Fig. 5 the operating mechanism for the rod 45 has a certain degree of snapaction. As is clear from Fig. 5, the crank 41 can not swing from its normal position illustrated in full-lines to the position of release illustrated in dotted-lines without raising the rear end of the operating member 49. By making the operating member of resilient material, it will have a tendency to retain the crank 47 in either limit of its angular adjustment because of the generally downward pressure it exerts on the In crank. If desired, the action of the operating member 49 in holding the crank 47 in the position of release may be supplemented by a spring 55 which acts between the operating member and the front longitudinal member 20 of the seat- I5. frame and tends to draw the operating member forwardly.

When the structure described is to be used as a davenport, the parts occupy the positions illustrated in Fig. 1. The back-frame and the rear 29 side of the seat-frame are supported by the links 40 and 41, while the front edge of the seat-frame rests upon and receives support from the upper edge of the front longitudinal member II of the davenport base. The force of gravity acting i, upon the links 32 maintains them in such a position that the pin 34 is engaged by the shoulder 30, thus holding the back-frame and seat-frame in definite angular relationship. The back-frame can not be tilted rearwardly without causing the :;o seat-frame to tilt upwardly; and, as the force of gravity has a much longer lever arm on the seatframe than it has on the back-frame, the structure is stable.

When it is desired to convert the davenport ,3illustrated in Fig. 1 into a bed, the front edge of the seat is grasped and raised. Because of the action of the links 32 in maintaining the backframe and seat-frame in fixed angular relationship, the two frames swing as a unit through a path determined by the links 40 and 41. As previously stated, the links 40 and 41 are so arranged that the lower end of the back-frame is carried forwardly as the back-frame is lowered, and continued elevation of. the front edge of the 4. seat therefore eventually results in bringing the back-frame and seat-frame to the respective positions illustrated in full-lines in Fig. 2, the cross members 29 of the back-frame resting upon the rear longitudinal member 12 of the davenportbase. This movement of the back-frame and seat-frame exposes the interior of the box formed by the members 11, 12, and 13 to permit the withdrawal of the bedding normally stored therein.

After the contents of the box have been removed, If desired, the finger piece 52 is grasped and drawn forwardly thus raising the links 32 and causing the shoulders 36 to pass out of engagement with the pins 34. When this occurs, the seat-frame can be lowered to the dotted- o . line position illustrated in Fig. 2, where its upper face is substantially co-planar with that of the back of the davenport. In this position, the seatframe is supported by the front longitudinal member II upon which the cross-members 23 of the seat-frame rest.

It is to be noted that as the seat-frame is swung downwardly from the full-line position to the dotted-line position shown in Fig. 2 and also in.Fig. 3 the- links 32 are swung in a counter- 7O clockwise direction relative to the seat-frame as the result of the engagement of the pin 34 with the lower side of the slot 33. Because of the engagement between the links 32 and the free ends of the cranks 46, this movement of the links 71 rocks the rod 45 in a counterclockwise direction in the seat-frame and restores it and the operating member 49 to the full-line position illustrated in Fig. 5, so that when the front edge of the seat frame is again lifted the links 32 will drop under the influence of gravity to permit the pins 34 to engage behind the shoulder 36. After this has occurred, downward and forward pressure on the front edge of the seat-frame will return li the structure to the position illustrated in Fig. 1.

It is to be noted that the links 32, 40, and 41 and their associated parts are all located between the ends of the seat-frame and back-frame. This permits all the mechanism to be covered by the upholstering material, as is clear from Fig. 1, and improves appearance.

I claim as my invention: 1. A bed davenport, comprising a base, a backframe, a seat-frame, means pivotally intercon2"' necting said back-frame and seat-frame, means guiding said back-frame for movement between a generally vertical position at the rear of said base and a horizontal position, a link pivotally connected to said seat-frame near the rear thereof, a pair of spaced abutments on said link, an abutment on said back-frame normally receivable between the pair of abutments on said link to hold the seat-frame and back-frame in predetermined angular relationship, and means car::) ried by said seat-frame for controlling said link, said means including an operating member normally positioned to permit engagement of the ink-abutments with the abutment on said backframe, said operating member being movable :3 from its normal position to swing said link to dissociate the abutments thereon from the abutment on the back-frame and thereby to permit the back-frame and seat-frame to be swung into substantially co-planar relationship, and cooperating provisions on said link and back-frame for restoring said operating member to its normal position as said back-frame and seat-frame are swung into co-planar relationship.

2. A bed davenport, comprising a base, a backframe, a seat-frame, means pivotally interconnecting said back-frame and seat-frame, means guiding said back-frame for movement between a generally vertical position at the rear of said base and a horizontal position, releasable means for maintaining said seat-frame and back-frame in predetermined angular relationship, said releasable means including an operating member carried by said seat-frame and manually movable from a normal positioii to release said releasable means, and interengaging provisions on said back-frame and releasable means for re- ]l storing said operating member to normal position as the back-frame and seat-frame are moved toward co-planar relationship.

3. A bed davenport, comprising a base, a backframe, a seat-frame, means pivotally intercon- I, necting said back-frame and seat-frame, means guiding said back-frame for movement between a generally vertical position at the rear of Said base and a horizontal position, releasable means for maintaining said seat-frame and back-frame in predetermined angular relationship, said releasable means including an operating member manually movable from a normal position to release said releasable means, provisions for restoring said operating member to normal position as the back-frame and seat-frame are moved toward co-planar relationship, and means for yieldingly opposing movement of said operating member from its normal position and also from its position of release. 4. A bed davenport, comprising a base, a backframe, a seat-frame, means pivotally interconnecting said back-frame and seat-frame, means guiding said back-frame for movement between a generally vertical position at the rear of said base :5i and a horizontal position, releasable means for maintaining said seat-frame and back-frame in predetermined angular relationship, said releasable means including an operating member manually movable from a normal position to release said releasable means, and means for yieldingly opposing movement of said operating member from its normal position and also from its position of release.

WILLIAM E. WUNDERIICH.