Title:
Portable water treating apparatus
United States Patent 2017456


Abstract:
The invention relates generally to water treating apparatus and more particularly to portable water treating apparatus. The object of the invention, generally stated, is to provide a water treating apparatus that is simple and efficient in operation and that may be readily and economically...



Inventors:
Austin, Gudmundsen
Application Number:
US67027433A
Publication Date:
10/15/1935
Filing Date:
05/10/1933
Assignee:
Austin, Gudmundsen
Primary Class:
Other Classes:
210/476, 210/501, 210/668, 210/764
International Classes:
C02F1/00; C02F1/50
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Description:

The invention relates generally to water treating apparatus and more particularly to portable water treating apparatus.

The object of the invention, generally stated, is to provide a water treating apparatus that is simple and efficient in operation and that may be readily and economically manufactured.

A more specific object of the invention is to provide a portable water treating apparatus that may be readily carried to any locality for use in the providing of a supply of palatable pure drinking water.

It is also an object of the invention to provide portable water treating apparatus that may be utilized under all ordinary conditions without danger of contaminated water entering the pure water chamber.

The invention accordingly is disclosed in the embodiment thereof shown in the accompanying drawing and comprises the features of construction, combination of elements, and arrangement of parts, which will be exemplified in the construction hereinafter set forth and the scope of the application of which will be indicated in the claims.

For a fuller understanding of the nature and objects of the invention, reference may be had to the following detailed description taken in conjunction with the accompanying drawing, in which: Figure 1 is a view in vertical section of a water treating apparatus constructed in accordance with the invention; and Figure 2 is a view, partly in section and partly in top elevation, showing details of the structure.

Referring now to the drawing, and Figure 1 in particular, the water treating apparatus comprises a container 10 which may be made from any suitable material which will meet the conditions to be found in the localities in which the water treating apparatus will be utilized. For most purposes I prefer to use a No. 26 gauge galvanized copper container tinned on the inside.

The container should be made from heavy gauge metal so that it will stand a certain amount of rough usage without any danger of leaks occurring. The size of the container will depend on the amount of treated water that it is required to draw off in a predetermined period of time.

In order to facilitate the pouring of the water, a spout I is provided. In this particular embodiment of the invention the spout is formed integral with the container. The forming of the spout in this manner is desirable since there are 56 no seams formed, along which cracks may occur, As shown, a flap or lid 12 is hinged to the container and covers the spout I I so that there is no danger of water or other extraneous matter entering the container. The hinge will be mounted so the lid will normally rest on the spout, thus maintaining it closed under all conditions except when pouring the water.

A receptacle 13 for raw water is disposed in the upper end of the container. While this receptacle is shown spaced slightly from the container wall for the purpose of illustration, in practice it would be made a fairly tight fit.

A downwardly curved flange 14 is provided on the upper edge of the receptacle. This flange extends outwardly far enough to fit over the upper edges of the container. As shown, the flange 14 supports the receptacle 13 on the container and receives the receptacle cover 15.

As illustrated, the receptacle cover extends over the flange and is rolled around its outer edge. The outer portion of the cover 15 and the flange 14 extend downwardly beyond the upper edge of the container providing something in the nature of a water shed. Thus when the water treating apparatus is being filled with raw water or exposed to rain and the extraneous matter normally found in the atmosphere, there is no danger of them entering the container.

In order to provide access to the receptacle 13, it is provided with an opening 16. A cap 17 is provided for closing this opening and engages an upwardly extending threaded neck 18 formed integral with the cover 15. Thus when the receptacle is filled with raw water, it may be carried without danger of spilling and it is also protected from collecting extraneous matter that may be in the air.

Many methods may be provided for transporting the portable water treating apparatus. The embodiment illustrated is one that may be carried and so a bail 19 is provided and attached to the container by means of lugs in the manner of mounting a bail on a pail.

In order to treat the water, filter beds are employed. In this particular instance, two filter beds are utilized, one an activated carbon filter bed and the other a germicidal filter bed. There are a number of materials available on the market for making the germicidal filter bed. The one which the applicant proposes to use is a substance sold under the trade-name of Sterolite. The germicidal filtering material known as "Sterolite" is a carrier such as a zeolite on which silver is deposited in minute particles. The carbon filter bed will be made from finely comminuted carbon and may be readily procured ir the market.

In order to properly locate the filter beds between the raw water receptacle and the container, I provide a filter barrel 20 which depends from and communicates with the raw water receptacle 13. As illustrated, the upper end of the filter barrel 20 is provided with an outwardly extending flange which seats on the bottom of 1 the receptacle and is soldered thereto forming a water-tight joint. The lower end of the barrel is closed by means of a cap 21.

A plurality of filter supports shown generally at 22 are mounted in the filter barrel. Each filter support comprises a rigid perforated plate 23 and a screen 24. The plate is strong enough to support the filter bed and the screen prevents any interchange of materials between the filter beds.

Seals 25 are provided between the barrel and the edges of the two lower filter supports. These seals are preferably made from some suitable pitch which will adhere to the filter barrel. Many such materials are available. This seal prevents water from seeping down the side of the filter barrel. It has another advantage in that it may be readily removed in the process of refilling the filter barrel with new filter beds.

The upper filter support is provided for preventing the washing of the carbon particles out of the filter bed when the filter is being subjected to a cleansing or reactivating process.

This filter support is retained in position by means of a snap ring 26 which engages in a circumferential depression 27 provided in the upper end of the filter barrel 20.

The lower filter support 22 is disposed only a short distance from the cap 21 providing a small water chamber. A standpipe 28 communicates with this water chamber. The standpipe may be connected to the water chamber in any suitable manner and in this instance it is shown extending into it and is soldered to the container making a water-tight joint. The standpipe is long enough to extend above the second filter support so that it will maintain the water level above the germicidal filter bed.

Many of the germicidal materials employed in making filter beds when dry may crack and thus provide channels through which raw water might penetrate and thus enter the container before being properly treated. In structures of this kind, it is desirable that the standpipe establishing communication between the filter barrel and the container be long enough to maintain the water level in the filter barrel above the germicidal filter bed.

The receptacle 13 and the filter barrel 20 are preferably made from No. 26 sheet copper tinned on the inside, while the standpipe 28 and perforated plates 23 are made from tinned copper.

Many other metals may be employed, but the sheet copper tinned on the inside and the tinned copper have been found satisfactory.

A detailed explanation of the functioning of the activated carbon filter bed and the germicidal filter bed will not be given since this is well known. It will suffice to state that the activated carbon filter bed will remove materials which are apt to give water a rancid and unpalatable taste, while the germicidal filter bed will destroy the bacteria that is often found in drinking water.

In using the water treating apparatus after the filter beds have been placed in position, raw 75, water is poured into the receptacle through the Sopening 18. It gradually percolates through the filter bed and enters the container through the standpipe 28. A flow of water through the standpipe will continue until the water level in the filter barrel has reached approximately the top of the spout. Water may be readily poured from the container through the spout 11.

After the filter beds have been in use for some time they may be cleansed by forcing a cleansing Ssolution therethrough in the reverse direction. A solution of common salt has been found suitable for a germicidal filter bed such as Sterolite.

The solution flowing through the carbon filter bed will set the particles in motion and this will be sufficient to bring about what is known as a reactivation.

Since certain changes may be made in the above invention and different embodiments of the invention made without departing from the scope thereof, it is intended that all matter contained in the above description or shown in the accompanying drawing shall be interpreted as illustrative and not in a limiting sense.

It is also to be understood that the following claims are intended to cover all of the generic and specific features of the invention herein described and all statements of the scope of the invention which, as a matter of language, may be said to fall therebetween.

I claim: 1. A portable water treating apparatus comprising, in combination, a container to receive the treated water, a receptacle carried by the container for receiving the raw water, a filter barrel depending from the receptacle into the container, a plurality of filter supports disposed in the filter barrel, a bed of germicidal filtering material carried by the supports, seals between the edges of the filter supports and the barrel, and a standpipe extending from the lower end of the barrel upwardly to a point above the filtering material to maintain a water level above the body of filtering material.

2. A portable water treating apparatus comprising, in combination, a container to receive the treated water, a receptacle to receive the raw water, a filter barrel communicating with the receptacle to receive the raw water and depending into the container, a plurality of filter supports disposed in the barrel, seals between the edges of the filter support and the barrel, a germicidal filter bed provided in the lower end of the barrel, an activated carbon filter bed in the upper end of the barrel, and a standpipe communicating with the lower end of the barrel and extending to a height above the germicidal filter bed to maintain a water level in the filter barrel above the germicidal filter bed.

3. A portable water treating apparatus comprising, in combination, a container to receive the treated water, a receptacle to receive the raw water carried by the container, a filter barrel communicating with the receptacle and tightly connected thereto depending into the container, a filter support spaced from the lower end of the barrel providing a water receiving chamber, a germicidal filter bed carried by the filter support, a second filter support disposed above the germicidal filter bed, an activated carbon filter bed carried by the second filter support, and a removable filter support disposed above the activated carbon filter bed for retaining the carbon in position when subjected to a flow of water in either direction and a standpipe outside the filter barrel for discharging the water from the filter bed, said standpipe extending upwardly to a point above the filter bed to maintain a water level in the barrel above the filter bed.

4. A portable water treating apparatus comprising in combination, a container for receiving the treated water, a receptacle carried by the container for receiving the raw water, a filter carrier disposed between the container for the treated water and the receptacle for the raw water, a germicidal filter bed in the filter carrier, a discharge means for receiving the water from the germicidal filter bed, the discharge means extending upwardly to a point above the germicidal filtering bed to maintain the body of the filtering material wet.

5. A portable water treating apparatus comprising, in combination, a container, a spout formed in the side of the container, a cover for the spout hinged to the container, a receptacle for raw water disposed in the upper end of the container, a flange provided on the receptacle to extend over the upper edge of the container, the flange serving to support the receptacle and cooperating to close the container and prevent the entry of raw water, a barrel depending from the raw water receptacle, a germicidal filtering material in the barrel, and a standpipe extending upwardly and terminating above the top of the filtering material, said standpipe being disposed outside the barrel for discharging the filtered water and maintaining a water level in the barrel sufficient to keep the filtering material wet.

6. A portable water treating apparatus comprising, in combination, a container, a spout formed in the side of the container, a cover for the spout hinged to the container, a receptacle for raw water disposed in the upper end of the container, a flange provided on the receptacle to extend over the upper edge of the container, the flange serving to support the receptacle and cooperating to close the container and prevent the entry of raw water, a barrel depending from the raw water receptacle, a germicidal filtering material in the barrel, and means outside the barrel for discharging the filtered water, said discharge means extending upwardly to a point above the germicidal filtering material to maintain a water level in the barrel above the body of the filtering material wet.

AUSTIN GUDMUNDSEN.