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Title:
Furnace tank construction
United States Patent 2016382
Abstract:
My invention relates to furnace structures and particularly to refractory blocks such as are used in building furnace tanks or in other situations where the blocks are exposed to very high temperatures. The invention is herein shown adapted to a furnace tank such as used for melting and refining...


Inventors:
Mcburney, James E.
Application Number:
US66026733A
Publication Date:
10/08/1935
Filing Date:
03/10/1933
Assignee:
OWENS ILLINOIS GLASS CO
Primary Class:
Other Classes:
52/590.1
International Classes:
C03B5/42
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Description:

My invention relates to furnace structures and particularly to refractory blocks such as are used in building furnace tanks or in other situations where the blocks are exposed to very high temperatures. The invention is herein shown adapted to a furnace tank such as used for melting and refining glass.

It has been noted in respect to such tanks that some of the tank blocks withstand the action of molten glass much better than other adjoining blocks which are apparently of the same composition and which are eaten out or corroded to a much greater extent. I have observed that these blocks, which are more resistant to the destructive action of the glass, are invariably cracked and that the crack runs substantially parallel to the surface exposed to the action of the glass near the center of the block, that is, about midway between the exposed surfaces of the block. The reasons why these blocks which are cracked withstand erosion better than those which are not cracked, are not entirely apparent, but it is believed that the difference is due mainly to the two following reasons: First, the inner section of the block when thus cracked is of practically a uniform temperature throughout and consequently is free from strain and less susceptible to erosion.

Second, because of the uniform temperature, particularly along the vertical dimensions of the block, there are less convection currents in the molten glass which contacts with the block and consequently less flow of glass over the surface of the block.

An object of the present invention is to provide a refractory tank block so constructed that the above described condition is obtained throughout the life of the block as well as being uniform in all the blocks. To this end the invention provides a furnace tank construction in which the individual blocks are so constructed that they provide inner and outer sections with interior adjoining faces or surfaces, the integrity of the block being broken at said surfaces intermediate the external faces of the block.

Other objects of the invention will appear hereinafter.

In the accompanying drawing: Figure 1 is a fragmentary perspective view of an incomplete tank furnace constructed in accordance with my invention.

Fig. 2 is a perspective view of a furnace tank block made in sections, the two sections being shown separated.

Figs. 3, 4 and 5 are similar views of modiflca65 tions.

Fig. 6 shows a further modification in which the block is made in a single piece.

Referring to Fig. 2, the tank block comprises an outer section 10 and a separate inner section II. The block as a whole is of rectangular shape and the sections are constructed to provide a dovetailed tongue and groove connection. For this purpose the inner section 11 is formed on its inner face with a dovetailed groove or recess 12 and the outer section is formed with a correspondingly shaped tongue 13 to fit said groove.

The tongue and groove extend vertically of the block. In other words, the block is built into the furnace with the tongue and groove extending vertically. The edges of the tongue are vertical so that the tongue is of the same width throughout its length. The edges of the groove are also vertical.

Fig. 3 shows a modification of the tongue and groove. In this construction, the edges 14 of the dovetail groove are downward and inwardly convergent or tapered. The edges of the dovetail tongue 13 are correspondingly tapered.

The interlocking connection between the sections 10 and II in the two forms shown in Figs. 2 and 3 serves to hold the sections securely together when assembled. Also, if a portion of the inner section should break while in use, the interlocking construction will usually prevent it from flowing away. It will be seen that by tapering the tongue and groove in the manner illustrated, the irmer section II is locked against upward movement relative to the outer section, and thereby prevented from floating upward or being lifted out of place by the buoyancy of the molten glass in the tank.

Fig. 4 shows a modification of the tongue and groove structure in which the marginal faces 15 of the groove and the corresponding faces 16 of the tongue are perpendicular to the main meeting faces of said sections.

Fig. 5 shows a further modification in which the tongue and groove are tapered as in the form shown in Fig. 3, but in which the marginal faces 17 of the groove and the corresponding faces of the tongue are perpendicular to the major meeting faces of the two block sections.

Figure 1 illustrates a tank furnace F adapted for melting and refining glass, portions of the furnace being omitted to illustrate the present invention. As here shown the tank walls are built up of blocks, each comprising an outer section 10 and an inner section II having interior adjoining surfaces. It will be seen that this provides a construction in which the tank walls virtually consist of an inner wall and an outer wall having interior meeting faces substantially midway between the inner and outer exposed faces of said walls, said walls being interlocked by the dovetail construction of the individual blocks.

This construction results when in use, in a substantially uniform or even temperature being maintained throughout each inner block section, thereby avoiding strains, rendering the blocks 1I less susceptible to erosion, breaking up, and deterioration. The comparatively uniform temperature that is thus obtained over the surface of the inner block section also materially reduces the convection currents and consequently reduces the ], destructive flow of glass over the surface of the block.

Fig. 6 shows a modification in which the block is made in a single piece. Kerfs or slots 18 are cut into the block about midway between the major faces thereof and parallel with said faces, thereby defining outer and inner sections 10a and 0Ib, respectively. These kerfs extend only part way through the block so that the inner and outer sections are integrally united: As these kerfs 2. separate the major portions of the block, they serve in substantially the same manner as described in connection with the other forms of block to equalize the temperature throughout the inner section of the block and reduce s'rain and 3!) erosion.

Modifications may be resorted to within the spirit and scope of my invention.

What I claim is: 1. A vertical furnace wall comprising blocks of :.' refractory material, each block comprising an inner section and an outer section having internal meeting faces intermediate the major exterior faces of the block, the outer section of each block being formed with a tapered tongue and the inner section with a corresponding groove to receive said tongue, each tongue and groove having its lateral edges downwardly and inwardly convergent.

2. A vertical furnace wall comprising blocks of refractory material, each block comprising an inner section and an outer section having internal meeting faces intermediate the major exterior faces of the block, the outer section of each block being formed with a tapered tongue and the inner section with a corresponding groove to receive said tongue, each tongue and groove having its lateral edges downwardly and inwardly convergent, said tongue and groove being shaped to provide an interlocking connection between the block sections. 3. A vertical furnace wall built of blocks of refractory material, each block comprising an inner section and an outer section having internal meeting faces intermediate the major exterior faces of the block, the meeting faces of each block being formed with interengaging tongue and groove, the side edges of the tongue and groove being inclined to the vertical and convergent in a direction to lock the inner section of the block against upward movement relative to the outer section.

4. A vertical furnace wall built of blocks of refractory material, each block comprising an inner section and an outer section having internal meeting faces intermediate the major exterior faces of the block, the meeting faces of each block being formed with interengaging tongue and groove, the side edges of the tongue and groove being inclined to the vertical and convergent in a direction to lock the inner section of the block 3i against upward movement relative to the outer section, said tongue and groove being interlocked against separation by relative movement in is direction transverse to the wall.

JAMES E. McBURNEY.