Title:
Game
United States Patent 2011163


Abstract:
T.-h is'tlhvntihi -elates to a game, and has foi its object to pro~id:e ah iiistirctive, amusing and entertaining game capable of being played by both children and adults. The improved game is such that simple rules of play may be used, or rules may be formulated which can be made quite intricate...



Inventors:
Rothschild, Walter L.
Application Number:
US73257534A
Publication Date:
08/13/1935
Filing Date:
06/27/1934
Assignee:
Rothschild, Walter L.
Primary Class:
Other Classes:
273/153R
International Classes:
A63F9/10; A63F9/00; A63F9/32
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Description:

T.-h is'tlhvntihi -elates to a game, and has foi its object to pro~id:e ah iiistirctive, amusing and entertaining game capable of being played by both children and adults. The improved game is such that simple rules of play may be used, or rules may be formulated which can be made quite intricate according to the skill of the players.

The primary object of the invention is to provide a game consisting of a number of pieces or game elements which, when placed together in proper relationship will produce certain results, the accuracy and speed of play depending upon the skill and alertness of the players.

In the accompanying drawing, wherein an embodiment of the invention is shown, Fig. 1 is a plan view of the set of forty-eight rods or pieces which constitute the game elements; Fig. 2 is a view of one of othe rods showing how the same is divided into eight imaginary sections or transverse bands; Fig. 3 is a view showing three rods placed together to form a matched set; and Fig. 4 is a view showing four rods placed together to form another matched set.

The full set of rods or playing elements used in the game is shown in Fig. 1. It will be there seen that forty-eight rods are shown, each of these rods being preferably made of wood, metal, or some suitable composition material. Each rod is divided into a number of imaginary transverse sections or bands. In the embodiment of the invention shown, each rod is divided into eight imaginary sections or bands, these sections or bands being indicated by the reference numerals 10, II, 12, 13, 16, 17, 18 and 19, as shown in Fig. 2.

85 Each rod bears one, two or three colored bands, each of the colored bands being the width of one of the imaginary sections. For example, the rod indicated at I in Fig. 1 is provided at one of its ends with a blue band 25. The rod indicated at 2 is provided with a red or other colored band 20, in a different position on its length from the band indicated at 25. Every possible combination of colored bands in the eight imaginary divisions on each rod exists in the full set, but not in each color. For example, there are twenty-one rods each, with red and blue bands, and six rods with two color bands. There are no duplicates. If a rod is different, when reversed, this rod represents two! combinations of bands. The colored bands may be placed upon the rods by painting or printing the colors thereon, by decalcomania, or by pasting or otherwise securing colored strips about the rods.

The object sought by each player in the game is the formation of a so-called "matched set", which is composed of three, fouror more rods.

SIllustrations of two of uch matched sets are found in Figs n. 3 and 4. In Fig. 3 the matched set is composed of three rods, while in Fig. 4 the matched set is made up of four rods. By the term "matched set" is meant three or more rods placed together, as shown in Figs. 3 and 4, with the colored bars on the several rods in the set so disposed that each imaginary transverse row in the several rods contains only one colored band. For example, in Fig. 3, the transverse space indicated at 10 in Fig. 2 contains a blue band 25a found on the rod indicated at 6. The space indicated at II contains a blue band 25b appearing on the rod 4 1; space 12 contains the blue band 25c appearing on rod 6, and space 13 contains the red band 20a found on rod 31. Similarly, space 16 contains the red band 20b on rod 31; space 17 containing blue band 25d on rod 41; space 18 containing blue band 25e on rod 41 and the last space, 19, containing the red band 20c on rod 31.

From the foregoing, it will be apparent that by starting with any one rod from the forty-eight rods provided, and carefully selecting additional rods, matched sets can be formed. In forming the matched set shown in Fig. 3, the rods employed were those shown at 6, 31 and 41. In the matched set shown in Fig. 4, the rods indicated at 15, 45, 14 and I were used. Starting with any one rod, the player is enabled to select and use other rods which will form the matched set, the object being to form a matched set speedily and in advance of the other players in the game.

Numerous rules may be easily formulated for the playing of the game. For example, a special scoring may be given when a player assembles a matched set composed of rods all bearing bands of a single color.

From two to seven players can play the game.

It can also be played by a single player as "solitaire" and the game may also be simplified so that children can play it.

In playing the game, the forty-eight rods are usually held in a large tray and their positions mixed. Each player is provided with a small tray or rack holding as many as five rods. One player selects a rod and places it in his rack; the second player then selects one, and so on. This continues until a player has placed together in his rack a sufficient number of matched rods to form a matched set. All of the rods in play are visible to the players and a skilled player may sometimes select a rod needed by his opponent, in an effort to deter his opponent from speedily assembling a matched set. Numerous specific rules of the game, including a scoring system, penalties, and the like, are easily made.

I have shown the game as consisting of fortyeight playing elements or rods. These may bei B increased or reduced in number according to the leanings of the players toward simplicity or intricacy. The playing elements are shown in the form of short cylindrical rods and the same may be of any other suitable cross-sectional shape. They may also be subdivided into more or less than the eight imaginary transverse bars or spaces referred to herein. These and other modifications may be made in the game without departing from the spirit of the invention.

What I claim is: 1. A game composed of a number of elongated playing elements each bearing a differently positioned identifying symbol occupying a part only of the length of the element, so that when a number of playing elements are placed together, they will produce a set of playing elements which will be transversely divided into equal parts, with an identifying symbol on one or the other of the playing elements located in each of the parts.

2. A game composed of forty-eight rods, each of which is divided into eight imaginary sections, each of the rods bearing one, two or three colored bands, said bands being each of a width of one section, said rods being adapted to be placed together in groups by a player to form a matched set consisting of several rods having one colored band only positioned in each of the imaginary transverse sections of the several contiguously placed rods.

3. A game composed of a number of rods, each of which is divided into a like number of transverse spaces of equal size, each of the rods bearing one or more identifying symbols the width of one of the transverse spaces, said rods being adapted for placement in contiguous position to form groups consisting of several rods having one symbol only positioned in each of the transverse spaces of the several contiguously placed rods.

WALTER L. ROTHSCHILD.