Title:
Device for use when drawing off liquids from containers
United States Patent 2009645


Abstract:
This invention is particularly of use when drawing beer or other gaseous liquids from barrels or other containers. Generally speaking, the teat and bung holes of a beer cask are closed by means of a cork driven tightly into the hole and sometimes the hole is fitted with a permanent metal bushing...



Inventors:
Trevallon, Barnes Frederick Joh
Application Number:
US62365032A
Publication Date:
07/30/1935
Filing Date:
07/20/1932
Assignee:
Trevallon, Barnes Frederick Joh
Primary Class:
Other Classes:
222/153.01, 251/144
International Classes:
B67D1/08
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Description:

This invention is particularly of use when drawing beer or other gaseous liquids from barrels or other containers. Generally speaking, the teat and bung holes of a beer cask are closed by means of a cork driven tightly into the hole and sometimes the hole is fitted with a permanent metal bushing into which is driven a wooden or other bung. These corks or bungs are generally (when it is desired to draw from the cask) driven into the cask by the racking cock or a spile, with consequent damage thereto and to the container, and damage is also caused when the tap is being removed. The object of this invention, therefore, is the production of improved means whereby the beer or other liquid may be stored and drawn without loss of gas or wastage of beer, and no skill or tools are needed for tapping the barrels or other containers. The tap may be inserted or withdrawn without damaging the fittings or container.

In carrying out the invention a metal bushing is screwed or driven into the teat or bung hole of the cask. The inner end of the bore of this bushing is formed to receive a cork or other bung, while the outer end is tapped to receive a hollow spile or adapter, with which is integrally formed or to which is screwed or otherwise secured a tap as hereinafter described or of ordinary construction. The spile or adapter is threaded so that it may be screwed into the bushing, and near the end is a number of ports.

The cork or bung is pushed the required distance into the bushing by a suitable tool and it is removed by the improved spile or adapter when being screwed into the bushing.

A capsule, seal, or other protector may be sprung and/or screwed into the bushing to prevent the ingress of dirt or other means of contamination, the screwed seal being of such a formation as to compress the cork or bung.

As an alternative arrangement, the cork or bung in the bung hole or bushing may be removed by means of a spile plugged at the inner end with a cork or other plug and having a head temporarily screwed into the outer end to take the blow of the hammer. This head is removed when the spile is in place and an adapter and/or tap, formed with a spile, is screwed in in its place, the action being such that the cork or bung is pushed from the spile into the container.

The tap which it is preferred to use is one in which the valve is on a slide rod which has a crosshead adjustable thereon. The crosshead carries, and the valve is operated by, a toggle lever linked to trunnions on the tap body.

?In order that the invention may be better understood it will now be more fully described with the aid of the accompanying drawing, in which Fig. 1 is a sectional elevation of one part of the invention; 9 Fig. 2 is a sectional elevation of another part of the invention; Fig. 3 is a sectional elevation of the parts shown in Figs. 1 and 2 assembled; Fig. 4 is a side elevation of the combination of another part of the invention with those parts shown in Figs 1, 2 and 3; Fig. 5 is an alternative arrangement; Figs. 6 and 7 are sectional elevations showing alternative arrangements of the parts shown in 1i Fig. 1; Figs. 8, 9, 10 and 11 are sectional elevations of different modifications of details, Figs. 8 and 9 being to a scale larger than that of the other figures. The bushing A is formed with a head A and a tapered portion A2 formed with an angular or round thread A3 with a fiat bottom. A perfect gas-tight joint is thus obtained when the bushing A is screwed into the head or bilge of the cask B.

The inner end C of the bore of the bushing A is formed to receive the cork, bung, or other plug CI, while the outer end C2 is tapped to receive a spile or adapter and/or tap as hereinafter described. The bore of the inner end C is, as shown in Figs. 1, 2, and 8 to 11, of greater diameter than the tapped portion C2. It may, as shown in Figs. 6 and 7, be of lesser diameter.

The spile or adapter D is tubular and is threaded at the inner end DI so that it can be screwed into the bushing A. An undercut shoulder D2 is formed on the spile or adapter D to receive the washer D3 of rubber, cured rubber, or other suitable material. The extreme end D4 is of reduced outer diameter and is provided with ports D5. A screwed socket D6 or nipple is formed on the outer end to receive a tap.

Alternatively, the spile or adapted D may be made integrally with the tap. The length of the spile D is preferably such that it does not project into the container, thus permitting the latter to be completely drained. Alternatively, it may be of any desired length, such as for use when a spile E (as in Fig. 7) is used in lieu of the bushing A or when the container is placed on end. In this latter case, as shown in Fig. 5, the socket D6 on the spile or adapter D would be provided with a gland and packing D7 for holding in the desired position the pipe D8 se. 6 cured to the tap hereinafter described or referred to.

In Fig. 7, the bushing is replaced by a spile E, which may be driven into the teat or bung hole. In this case, the outer surface El is tapered and roughened in the usual manner for almost the full length, and a head E2, which may be screwed into the socket E3, is provided to take the blow of the hammer when the spile is being driven into the head or bilge of the container.

The spile E is closed with a cork E4 while being driven but which is removed by the spile D formed on or secured to a tap F2. The spile D in this case is made longer than in the case of Figs. 1, 2 and 3.

The tap which it is preferred to use in conjunction with the parts as hereinbefore described is illustrated in Fig. 4. A valve F on a slide rod FI slidable within the body F2 is adjustably secured to the crosshead F3. This crosshead F3 carries, and is operated by, a toggle lever F4 linked to the trunnions F5 on the tap body F2.

The lever F4 may be provided with a handle F6 adjustable as to position thereon. The handle consists of a hand grip F6 and a yoke Fl, which latter fits over the lever F4 and is tightened against the latter by the screw F8.

The seat G, made of tin or other metal, is sprung into a dovetailed recess GI in the bushing A, as shown in Fig. 8, or over the head Al thereof, as shown in Fig. 9. This seal is provided for preventing the ingress of dirt or other foreign matter. The bore may be closed by a screwed plug H, which may have a conical point HI, as shown in Fig. 10, which is forced into and which compresses the cork CI. The point may be formed as a screw H2, as shown in Fig. 11.

In carrying the invention into effect, metals best suited for their respective purposes would be used, and the shape and other details would be varied as found necessary or desirable so long as the essential features of the invention are retained.

In use, the cask or other container, fitted with the bushing A as described and filled as usual, is closed by a cork Cl or other bung forced in by a suitable instrument. The seal G is then forced into position by a suitable tool or the screw plug H screwed in. Then, when it is desired to draw the contents, the seal is removed by means of a suitable device and the spile or adapter D with tap F2 is screwed into the bushing, forcing the cork Cl or other bung out at the inner end. As the ports D4 are uncovered there is a sudden rush of gas to within the spile D and the gas pressure on each side of the cork Cl is equalized, with the result that the cork falls away from the entrance to the spile, as shown in Fig. 3.

A a tap of ordinary construction for attachment to the spile or adapter or formed integrally therewith may be used in lieu of the arrangement shown in Fig. 4.

Having now particularly described and ascertained the nature of my said invention and in what manner the same is to be performed, I declare that what I claim is:Improved means for use in drawing liquids from containers including a tubular bushing threaded for engagement with the container, a head integral with the outer end thereof and provided with a dove-tailed recess in its outer face, £5 the bore of the bushing being threaded at the end adjacent the head and the remaining inner portion being enlarged and smooth, a bung in the smooth inner enlarged end of the bore of the bushing and prevented from displacement exteriorly by the threaded portion, a spile engageable with the bushing and including a tubular body exteriorly threaded adjacent one end for engagement with the internal threads of the bushing, a shoulder integral with the body of the spile and considerably spaced from the head and provided with an undercut recess, a wide tubular washer on the spile body and clamped between the shoulder and the head and within the recess therein upon the insertion of the spile body into the bushing thereby providing a protective seal against leakage of gas and liquid in addition to causing a displacement of the bung, and an outlet connection on the outer end of the spile body. FREDERICK JOHN TREVALLON BARNES.