Title:
Pneumatic shoe
United States Patent 2004906


Abstract:
This invention relates to foot wear, such as shoes, boots and the like, and has as its principal object the provision of pneumatic means to support the foot, whereby an unusual degree of comfort is attained due to the elasticity of the air supported sole. Another feature is the provision of...



Inventors:
Simister, Louis W.
Application Number:
US71398934A
Publication Date:
06/11/1935
Filing Date:
03/05/1934
Assignee:
Joseph, Farese
Primary Class:
Other Classes:
36/153
International Classes:
A43B13/20
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Description:

This invention relates to foot wear, such as shoes, boots and the like, and has as its principal object the provision of pneumatic means to support the foot, whereby an unusual degree of comfort is attained due to the elasticity of the air supported sole.

Another feature is the provision of an intermediate sole for shoes, containing an inflatable chamber co-extensive with the area of the foot.

A further aim of the invention is the provision in the inflatable chamber of another and similar inflatable chamber to extend over the shank of a shoe, to give additional elasticity to that part of the shoe and comfort to the foot.

10 Another feature of the invention is the provision of a rim of hard rubber or similar material about the air-filled intermediate sole, to prevent its breaking while in use.

Another purpose of the invention is the provision of a simple, inexpensive pneumatic support for shoes which may be attached to any shoe upon the market.

These and other useful and advantageous objects and advantages are obtained by the novel construction and combination of parts hereinafter described and shown in the accompanying drawing, forming a material part of this disclosure, and in which: Figure 1 is a side elevational view of a conventional type of shoe, as made in accordance with the invention.

Figure 2 is a side elevational view of a portion of the upper part of a shoe, the outer sole and heel having been omitted.

Figure 3 is a bottom plan view of a shoe, part of the outer sole being broken away, to show the intermediate, air-filled sole.

Figure 4 is a transverse sectional view, taken on line 4-4 of Figure 3.

S Figure 5 is a similar sectional view, taken on line 5-5 of Figure 3.

Figure 6 is a bottom plan view of the shoe.

Figure 7 is a transverse sectional view similar to Figure 4, showing the first step of a method of inflating the intermediate sole.

Figure 8 is a view similar to Figure 7, showing the second step of a method of inflating the intermediate sole.

Figure 9 is a similar view, showing the intermediate sole filled with air.

Referring more in detail to the drawing, the reference character 10 designates in general a conventional type of shoe, having an upper sole 11, an intermediate, inflatable sole 12 and an outer or tread sole 13, to which is attached a heel 14.

The improvement consists in the insertion between the upper and the lower or tread sole, of a pneumatic sole, indicated generally by the numeral 12 which consists of a rubber inlay of the shape of a sole. This rubber inlay is provided along its border with a frame or rim 15 of hard rubber or other suitable hard material. The rim 15 unites the upper sheet 16 and the lower sheet 17 of the inlay 12, intermediate of which is a chamber 18.

In order to make the shoe still more elastic and walking still more comfortable, there is provided within the chamber 18 a secondary chamber 19, cemented or otherwise attached thereto midway between the sides of the chamber and extending over the instep of the shoe, to materially support the same.

One method of inflating the chamber 18 is shown'in Figures 7, 8 and 9 of the drawing. The device may be made of an upper and lower part 16-17 respectively, forming a chamber 18 therebetween. The outer rim is securely molded about the device and made completely air tight. Only a small opening is left, into which a tube 20 is inserted which is connected to any convenient source of compressed air or the like, by which the sole is inflated. The secondary chamber 19 may be inflated in a similar manner. In operation, the upper part of the shoe is first completed. Then the heel is nailed or otherwise secured to the tread sole 13. The heel, as may be seen in Figure 6, is somewhat smaller than the surface of the sole 13. The intermediate, air-filled sole is then placed upon the inner side of the tread sole, and both the intermediate sole and the tread sole are then secured to the upper sole 1I, by stitching or in any other suitable manner. The foregoing disclosure is to be regarded as descriptive and illustrative only, and not as restrictive or limitative of the invention, of which an embodiment may obviously be constructed containing many modifications without departing from the spirit of the invention or from the scope of the appended claims.

Having thus described the invention, what is claimed as new, and desired to be secured by Letters Patent, is: 1. A shoe sole having an inflatable chamber substantially co-extensive with the area of the surface of the sole, and a secondary inflatable chamber securely positioned therein in the plane of the first named member. 2. A shoe sole comprising a rim, sheets of elastic material secured to the upper and lower surfaces of said rim to provide an air chamber intermediate the sheets and the rim, and a secondary air chamber of elastic material securely positioned in said first named chamber below the shank portion.

3. A shoe sole comprising a rim, upper and lower walls of elastic material secured to said rim to provide an air chamber in said sole, a secondary air chamber of elastic material securely positioned in said first named chamber and extending over the shank portion of the sole.

LOUIS W, SIMISTER.

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