Title:
Apparatus for cooking material
United States Patent 2004775


Abstract:
My invention relates to the cooking of food, and more particularly to that phase of the culinary art which deals with the roasting of material. It is among the objects of my invention to provide apparatus for cooking material by means of which the maximum of tenderness and flavor is derived....



Inventors:
Vincent, Wright
Application Number:
US54485731A
Publication Date:
06/11/1935
Filing Date:
06/16/1931
Assignee:
Vincent, Wright
Primary Class:
Other Classes:
99/427, 126/41B
International Classes:
A47J37/04
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Description:

My invention relates to the cooking of food, and more particularly to that phase of the culinary art which deals with the roasting of material.

It is among the objects of my invention to provide apparatus for cooking material by means of which the maximum of tenderness and flavor is derived.

Another object of my invention is to provide apparatus of the character described which requires but little attention during the cooking operation.

Another object of my invention includes the provision, in apparatus of the character described, of means for conserving and turning back to the material substantially all of the juices released by the material during the cooking process.

Still another object of my invention is to provide apparatus of the character described which will reduce tough meat to a delicious and tender state.

A still further object of my invention is to provide apparatus of the character described by means of which dried fruit, such as prunes, may be processed to render them soft, palatable and extremely tasty.

The invention possesses other objects and features of advantage, some of which, with the foregoing, will be set forth in the following description of my invention. It is to be understood that I do not limit myself to this disclosure of species of my invention, as I may adopt variant embodiments thereof within the scope of the claims.

Referring to the drawings: Figure 1 is a longitudinal vertical sectional view of the apparatus for cooking material embodying my invention.

Figure 2 is a transverse vertical sectional view of the apparatus taken in a plane indicated by the line 2-2 of Figure 1, showing the furnace and oven door in end elevation, and with portions of the view broken away to disclose the construction more clearly; and Figure 3 is a similar view taken in a plane indicated by the line 3-3 of Figure 1, showing the drum construction.

Figure 4 is a fragmentary perspective view showing the catches for latching the drum door in the closed position.

Figure 5 is a side view, partly in section and partly in elevation, showing a modified form of my invention which is particularly applicable to the roasting of comparatively large unit portions of material, such as meats.

Figure 6 is a view similar to that shown in Figure 1, and illustrates a variant form of the apparatus for cooking material embodying my invention; and Figure 7 is a vertical sectional view of the same, 5: taken in a plane indicated by the line 1-7 of Figure 6.

In greater detail, and referring particularly to Figures 1 to 5, the apparatus for cooking materials embodying my invention, as applied .to the processing of dried fruit, such as prunes, comprises a suitable oven in which the material may be roasted. For purposes of illustration a furnace 2, of brickwork or other suitable construction, is shown; the furnace being supported by a suitable foundation 3. A casing 4 is built into the furnace to provide an oven 6, and an aperture 7 is provided in the forward wall of the furnace opening into the oven. A nozzle 8, for injecting oil or other suitable combustible into the firebox 9, provides means for firing the furnace. The materials under combustion pass upwardly about the sides of the oven casing 4, and the burnt gases are finally carried off by-way of a suitable flue II adjacent the upper portions -5. of the furnace.

As best shown in Figures 1 and 2, a pair of rails 12, supported at one end by the furnace 2 and at the other end by suitable standards 13, are positioned adjacent the bottom of the oven 6 30, and are arranged to pass through the opening 7 and project outwardly of the furnace. A!suitable carriage, comprising the end plates 14 and IS connected together by the angle irons I17; is provided, and is movably mounted on the rails ;2 by the flanged wheels 18. This carriage has a length substantially equal to the length of the oven, and is adapted to move from a. position within the oven to a position without. The solid 4 lines in Figure 1 show the carriage in the retracted position, while the dotted lines. indicate the extended position of the carriage. A suitable eye 19 secured to the forward plate 14 of the carriage provides means for inserting a hook for extending or retracting the carriage.

As best shown in Figure 1, the forward end plate 14 of the carriage is adapted to seat in a recess 21 provided in the forward wall of the furnace 2, in the retracted position of the carriage. In other words, the forward end plate of the carriage is utilized as a door for the oven.

A similar recess 22 is provided in the forward wall of the furnace adjacent the inside of the oven, in which the rear end wall 16 of the carriage is adapted to seat when the carriage is i] the extended position. It is thus seen that th end wall 16 also provides a door for the oven and that the oven is closed in both the extendec 6 and retracted positions of the carriage. Suitabli latches 23 are mounted on the forward wall o: the furnace for clamping the door plate 14 closec in the retracted position of the carriage.

Referring particularly to Figures 1 and 3, a receptacle is mounted on the carriage for receiv ing the material to be cooked. This receptacl( is preferably drum-shaped, and comprises th( end disks 24 and 26 connected by the cylindrica wall 27. Means are provided for rotatably mounting the receptacle or drum on the carriage, and to this end a stub shaft 28 is secured to the forward end disk 24 of the drum; a boss 29 being provided for effecting a secure mounting. An aperture 31 is cut in the forward end plate 14 of the carriage, through which the shaft 28 is adapted to project, and a collar 32 is provided on the end of the shaft to hold it against inward movement. The journal for the shaft 28 is preferably provided by the cradle rolls 33 journaled on the end plate 14. Note Figure 2.

A butt flanged stud 34 is secured to the rear end disk 26 of the drum and is journaled by cradling its flange 36 in suitable rolls 37 journaled in the rear plate 16 of the carriage. Note Figure 3. The outer end of the stud 34 is provided with suitable jaws 38 adapted to mesh with complementary jaws provided on the end of an axially aligned shaft 39; the shaft 39 being journaled in a bearing 41 secured to the rear wall of the furnace 2. A jaw clutch is thus provided which is engaged when the carriage is within the oven, and which readily disengages to permit free movement of the carriage to the extended position.

Means are provided for rotating the drum. A suitable motor 42 is mounted on the foundation 3 adjacent the rear of the furnace 2, and is drivably connected with the shaft 39. The drive is preferably effected by a chain belt 43 connecting asprocket 44 carried by the shaft 39 with a second sprocket 46 journaled adjacent the motor 42; this latter sprocket being driven by the motor through a suitable reduction gearing 47. The speed reduction from the motor to the drum is such that the drum is rotated comparatively slowly.

A door 48 is provided for passing the material to be cooked into the drum. As best shown in Figures 3 and 4, portions are cut out from the cylindrical wall 27 of the drum and are connected with the main body of the wall 27 by the hinge 49. A flange 51 is secured to the edges of the door 48 and is adapted to rest on the surface of the wall 27 in a closed position of the door, so that a tight fit is insured. A gasket 52 is preferably interposed between the flange 51 and the wall 27 to make a water-tight joint. Means are also provided for latching the door in the closed position. For this purpose a pair of arched loops 53 are pivotally mounted on the free end of the door 48, and a pair of hooked levers 54 are pivotally mounted on the drum wall 27 for engaging the loops 53 to secure the door and draw it tight in the closed position.

S When it is desirable to introduce the prunes into the drum it is only necessary to extend the carriage and rotate the drum until the door 48 is adjacent the top. By now opening the door Sthe prunes may be poured into the drum. When 7 it is desired to remove the cooked material from n the drum the carriage is extended and the drum e rotated until the door is adjacent the bottom. ,By positioning a suitable container below the d projecting portions of the rails 12 the material e will fall directly into the container when the f door 48 is opened.

d Means are provided for holding the material to be cooked away from the cylindrical wall 27 - of the drum. When the material is of a com- paratively small size, as in the case with dried e fruits such as prunes, the supporting means is e preferably in the nature of an inner wall. As best I shown in Figure 3, a plurality of spacing ribs 56 - are secured to the cylindrical wall 27 and the door S48, and are arranged to extend longitudinally of Sthe drum. A strip 57 is secured to the inner edge of each rib; these strips being arranged in spaced Srelation to provide an inner wall having a plurality of slot-like apertures 58 opening into the space between the inner and outer walls of the L drum. By building up the inner wall in this manner the structure does not interfere with the opening and closing of the door 48.

When the prunes are placed in the drum they will be supported by the inner wall, and when the drum is rotated they will be turned over and over as they roll along the wall. In order to facilitate the removal of the prunes when the door 48 is opened a curved plate 59 is positioned at each end of the drum adjacent the sides of 30: the door; the plates being positioned to cut out the sharp corners between the ends of the drum and the inner wall, so as to direct the prunes to the opening provided by the door.

With the above apparatus in mind, the cooking or processing of a dried fruit, such as prunes, is as follows: With the carriage in the extended position, the furnace is fired and the oven allowed to heat. While in the extended position the door 48 of the drum is opened and a quantity of the dried prunes, say fifty pounds, is poured into the drum, together with a quantity of fluid, such as water. The amount of water needed will depend upon the character of the fruit. For fifty pounds of ordinary dried prunes I have found that a quart of water is about the right amount to get the proper results.

When the prunes are introduced they will, of course, be caught up and held by the inner wall of the drum, while the water will pass through and be held by the outer wall of the drum; it thus being seen that the lower portions of the drum provide a reservoir for the introduced fluid, and that the prunes are supported above the fluid in the reservoir. When the temperature of the s5 oven has reached a predetermined maximum temperature, say about 2500 F., the carriage with the drum door closed and in the latched position is moved into the oven. The motor 42 is then started so that the drum will begin rotating. After a short interval of time the flame is decreased so that the temperature of the oven drops to a predetermined cooking temperature, say about 2000 F. This maintains the water in the 65 drum at a point just below its boiling temperature. As the drum rotates the prunes turn over and over as they roll along the inner wall, and at the same times the ribs or fins 56 operate to continuously carry the water from the reservoir upwardly and deposit it on the upper portions of the prunes. The flavored juices which are released by the prunes during the cooking process mix with the water in the reservoir, and this mixture is constantly being poured over the tumbling 1_1. prunes to continuously and uniformly baste: the same.

Since the entire -action. thus described takes place with'in, a closed receptacle substantially all of thej-uices are conserved, and none of the flavors are lost. Furthermore, since neither boiling water or' steam, are utilized, the cooking or processing is not a severe one and the skins of the prunes are not broken'. I have found that the processing of fifty pounds of prunes takes about 6 hours, after which time substantially all of the introduced water and released juices are absorbed by the prunes. Processed in this. manner, dried prunes become soft, palatable and delicious to the taste.

A modification of my invention, particularly adapted for cooking meats, is shown inFigure 5.

This construction may conveniently be made smaller and more compact than shown and described for the processing of dried fruit. The 20- entire device may conveniently be mounted within an oven, and it is contemplated that it be used in smaller establishments, such as in the home or in restaurants; the roaster being adapted for installation in the oven of an ordinary stove. The 25. roasters may be installed in the ovens of stoves already in use, or may be built in stoves when the, latter are manufactured.

With reference to the figure above referred to, the roaster comprises an open ended drum 61 30; having a ribbed annular ring 62 secured against its forward end. A bracket 63 is provided carrying a grooved roller 64 adapted to engage the ribbed ring 62. Preferably two such rollers are provided, one on each side of the drum to form a cradle. 35- A shaft 66 is secured to the rear end of the drum, and is journaled in a bearing bracket 67; the brackets 63 and 67 being suitably secured to the bottom of an oven. The shaft 66 is arranged to project through the rear end of an oven, and is connected with suitable means for rotating the drum. , The driving means may conveniently be of a type similar to that shown in Figure 1.

The open end of the drumi is provided with an inturned flange 68, providing a seat fora: demountable cover or door 69 This door is shown as being built of a double thickness of material; it being obvious however that this construction' may be varied. A gasket 7 1 is preferably interposed between the door and the flange 68 so that a water-tight joint is insured.. A spit 72 is secured to the central portions of the door 69, and is arranged to project into the drum 61 for carrying the material, such as a piece of meat.

Suitable latch means are provided for clamping the door in the closed position. For this purpose a spring yoke 73 is provided and is pivotaily mounted on the drum 6 . When the door is to be opened this yoke may be swung clear of the door, and when the door is closed the yoke may be moved into engagement with a projection 74- extending outwardly from the central portions of the door. Pressure exerted by the spring yoke 73 on the projection 74 serves to hold the door tightly closed.

65- Spaced around the drum and suitably secured to the inner side of its cylindrical wall are a plurality of ribs or fins 76 of a character similar to the ribs 56 described in connection with the drum shown in Figure 3. These fins are provided for carrying a fluid from the lower portions.of the drum to a point above the material being cooked.

With this apparatus in mind the method of cooking is similar to that described in connection with the processing of prunes. Briefly the methed is as-follows: With the demountable cover or door 69 removed and the oven door closed, the oven is allowed to reach a predetermined maximum temperature, say about 250. F. The oven door is then opened and a quantity of fluid, such as water, poured into the bottom of the drum 1. The drum cover 589, with the meat or other material to be roasted supported by the spit 72, is then seated over the end of the drum and clamped in place by the latch yoke 73. After these operatioas have been completed the oven door is again closed and the shaft 66 rotated to revolve the drum.

The temperature of the oven is then allowed to drop to a predetermined cooking temperature, say around 2000 F; As the drum rotates the spit 72 carrying the meat is-also rotated to continuously turn the meat. At the same time, the fins 716 carry the fluid upwardly from the reservoir in the bottom of the drum and deposit the 2' same on the upper portion of the meat. -As the meat begins to roast the released juices drop down and mix with the fluid at the bottom of the drum; the fins 76 operating to continuously baste the meat with this mixture. Since the meat is 25constantly turning, all portions of the same are brought under the influence of the basting fluid.

While 200" F. has been set forth as the cooking temperature, it is to be noted that this temperature may be varied, depending upon the nature and character of the meat or other food being cooked.

Figures 6 and 7 illustrate another variant form of the apparatus for cooking material embodying my invention, also adapted particularly for the processing of dry fruit, such as prunes. This embodinment of the apparatus differs from that shown in Figure 1 by having a drum 77 permanently positioned within the oven 6. The drum is rotatably mounted within the oven, and means, -ia preferably similar to that shown in Figure 1, are provided for rotating the drum.

The forward end of the drum is supported by. a pair of cradle rolls 78 engaging a ribbed annular ring 79 carried by the drum. The rolls 78 are 4 journaled in the bearing bracket 81 mounted on a suitable cross bar 82 fixed adjacent the bottom of the oven. 6. A shaft 83 secured to the rear end of the drum 77 passes through the rear wall of the furnace 2 and is journaled in a bearing *5. bracket 84; the sprocket 44-of ithe driving means being secured to the projecting end of the shaft 83.

A door 86,, preferably hinged to the forward wall of the furnace 2, is provided for closing the 55aperture 7 opening into the oven. A suitable latch  is provided for holding the door in the closed position. The forward end of the drum 17 is positioned so that by opening the oven door 86 the open end of the drum is exposed. An in- 00 turned flange 88 is provided at the forward end of the drum 77, and a door 89 is hingably mounted on the forward end of the drum to provide a cover for its open'end. A gasket 9S1 arranged between the drum door 2S1 and the drum flange 88 is 65preferably provided to insure a tight joint between these parts, and a suitable latch 92 is provided for holding the drum door in the closed position.

A plurality of ribs or fins 93 are disposed about the inner surface of the drum 77, and are provided for the same purpose that the fins 56 were provided for in the drum shown in Figure 1.

The webs or fins 93 have a width substantially equal to the depth of the drum flange 88, so i -I ii ยท that the inner edges of these webs provide a slideway for an inner drum-shaped container.

The cylindrical wall and rear end wall of, this inner container is preferably of a foraminated material such as the wire mesh 94, held in shape by the reinforcing rings 96; a tie rod 97 being positioned at points about the inner container to further reinforce the structure. The container rings 96 have a diameter substantially equal to the drum opening, so that the container may be readily slid to a position within the drum, and, when in that position, be supported by the ribs 93.

A suitable cover 98 is provided for the container. The cover may conveniently be of a cup-shape adapted to seat over the forward end ring 96 of the container. A slot 99 provided in the rim of the cover, adapted to engage a pin 101 fixed on the container rings 96, conveniently provides means for holding the cover in the closed position. Suitable pins 102 are also provided in the rear end of the drum 77, and are adapted to engage suitable apertures provided in the rear container ring 96 to insure rotation of the inner container when the drum 17 is rotated.

When it is desired to introduce the material to be cooked into the drum 77 it is only necessary to place the material in the removable container. When the material is finally cooked, withdrawal of the inner container operates to remove the material from the drum. The removable container feature of this form of apparatus embodying my invention not only facilitates the handling of, the material being cooked, but also assists in the cleaning of the apparatus; it being understood that the removable container may readily be hosed or washed in demounted position.

The uniform basting, together with the fact that the food is constantly turning and is not actually immersed in the basting fluid, insures regular and even cooking. Furthermore, since the turning, basting and cooking processes take place in a closed receptacle none of the flavors in the food are lost. The amount of water originally introduced with the food and the duration of the cooking process depends largely on the size, character and quality of the meat or other material being roasted. The cooking however is carried forward until substantially all of the added water together with the released juices are absorbed by the food; the result being that the maximum of tenderness and flavor is derived. I claim: 1. In a cooking apparatus, a cylinder, means for rotatably mounting said cylinder to turn about a horizontal axis, internal ribs extending longitudinally of said cylinder and projecting radially from walls thereof in spaced relation to each other circumferentially of the cylinder and flanges extending along free side edges of said ribs whereby material placed within the cylinder will be held in spaced relation to its walls and the flanged ribs serve to carry basting fluid upwardly from the lower portion of the cylinder and Sdump the fluid at the upper portion thereof during rotation of the cylinder.

2. In a cooking apparatus, a cylinder having an annular wall and heads at its ends, means for rotatably mounting said cylinder to turn about its longitudinal axis, ribs extending longitudinally in said cylinder between its heads and projecting radially from its annular wall, said ribs being spaced from each other circumferentially of the cylinder and having transverse flanges along their free inner side edges serving to hold material in the cylinder spaced from the annular wall and constituting dippers for carrying basting fluid upwardly from the lower portion of the cylinder during rotation thereof and means for imparting rotary motion to the cylinder.

S3. In a cooking apparatus, a cylinder, means for rotatably mounting the cylinder to turn about a horizontal axis, ribs extending longitudinally in said cylinder and disposed radially thereof, said ribs having transverse flanges along their free side edges, the cylinder being open at one end, a door movable into and out of closing relation to the open end of, said cylinder, and a foraminous article holder of cylindrical formation slidable into and out of said cylinder through the open end thereof and when in place within the cylinder having its walls contacting with the flanges of said ribs.

4. In a cooking apparatus, an oven open at its front, a carriage slidable into and out of the oven through the front opening thereof, plates at inner and outer ends of said carriage and alternately serving as closures for the front opening when the carriage is slid into and out of the oven, a cylinder extending longitudinally of said carriage and having shafts at its ends journaled through the plates to rotatably mount the cylinder and means for rotating said cylinder including a shaft journaled through the rear wall of the oven and engageable with the rear shaft of the cylinder when the carriage is within the oven.

5. In a cooking apparatus, an oven open at its front, a carriage slidable into and out of the oven through the front opening thereof, plates at inner and outer ends of said carriage and alternately serving as closures for the front opening when the carriage is slid into and out of the oven, a cylinder extending longitudinally of said carriage and having shafts at its ends journaled through the plates to rotatably mount the cylinder, means for imparting rotary motion to said cylinder when the cylinder is within the oven, said cylinder having an entrance opening in its annular wall, a door for closing the entrance opening, ribs carried by said door and the annular wall of said cylinder and disposed radially of the cylinder and deflector plates extending at an incline between heads of the cylinder and ends of the entrance opening for directing material out of the cylinder through the opening.

VINCENT WRIGHT. 65